Date   

Stanislaus and Merced County Birding

Nathan Parmeter
 

Hello all Central Valley Birders,

Today, my parents and I did some birding in several locations in western Stanislaus and Merced counties. There were two main highlights today:

1) At the intersection of CA-132 and Gates Road/Paradise Road east of the San Joaquin River NWR (https://www.google.com/maps/@37.6348717,-121.158109,16.25z), we saw a massive flock of geese in a field SE of the intersection. Upon closer inspection, we realized the flock consisted of thousands (we estimated around 8,000) Aleutian Cackling Geese, with some Snow Geese mixed in. 


2) At Merced NWR, we saw 2 Vermilion Flycatchers. One was a female at the SW corner of the auto tour route, and a male in a tree next to the Bittern Marsh area at the SE corner. That, and an estimated around 45,000 white geese throughout the rufuge, most presumably Ross's. 


Nathan Parmeter
Fresno, CA


Re: update on 1st cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull at Davis Landfill pond

Todd Easterla
 

This is clearly a LBGU. Seeing one blurry image on my phone from Whatsapp. Is so freaking frustrating and getting old!

 

Glad to see someone post a link to other images.

 

Todd Easterla

 

From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io [mailto:centralvalleybirds@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Hampton
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2021 7:28 AM
To: cvbirds
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] update on 1st cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull at Davis Landfill pond

 

All, 

 

The other day Lucas Corneliussen, together with Lucas and Mark Stephenson, reported a 1st cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull at the Yolo County Landfill. The photos are here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S80296258

There is also a video. 

 

I engaged them in a discussion about the id-- my main concerns being the solid tail (in the last photo) and the rather pale upperparts (scaps and back). LC emailed me the video for better viewing than on a phone. This provided some views that clearly showed a banded tail okay for LBBG. We then sent the images and video to Amar Ayyesh, an expert in the East familiar with separating 1st cycle LBBG from Herring-- relatively straight forward at close range but challenging at the distances we are typically dealing with at Yolo Landfill. Amar replied that it looks "pretty good" for LBB, noting the darker greater covert bases, long wings at rest, whitish breast, and tail band. He did have reservations about the paler post-juv scaps. 

 

I think, based on the video, that the bird was in the smaller water area on the east side of the landfill pond. This can be viewed from the levee above Rd 28H -- and you can walk down across the road right up to the fence. A scope is important. Unfortunately, with a north wind, the gulls are typically at the far north edge of the pond, so I recommend waiting until the wind dies down or turns to the south. 

 

LBBG has become annual in Yolo County, so a 1st cycle bird is expected-- though difficult to pick out. The adult LBBG is still around, usually sleeping among Calif Gulls in the vicinity of the long diagonal swale that cuts thru the pond. This adult bird is best picked out on an overcast day (when the true mantle colors are easier to discern), when all the birds are facing the same direction, and when you position yourself to be looking sideways at the birds. I've found it in a few minutes under these conditions.   

 

good birding, 

 

--

Steve Hampton

Davis, CA


Red Crossbills

Dan Murphy
 

This morning around 8:30 there was one female and one immature Red Crossbill at the fountain in the Sacramento City Cemetery.

Dan Murphy
Sacramento 


Tropical Kingbird

Randy Couch
 


Found myself in Sacramento yesterday and suspected I was near Reichert Park and the Tropical Kingbird siting. A quick check on Google Maps showed that I was only 8 minutes away with at least 30 minutes of daylight left. The bird was not there when I first arrived but showed up as if in cue 5 minutes later. There are two bare sycamore trees next to the road. The bird showed up in the top of the southeastermost tree. Observed it flycatching for ten or fifteen minutes before I had to leave. 

Randy Couch,
Vacaville


Sent from Randy Couch


update on 1st cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull at Davis Landfill pond

Steve Hampton
 

All, 

The other day Lucas Corneliussen, together with Lucas and Mark Stephenson, reported a 1st cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull at the Yolo County Landfill. The photos are here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S80296258
There is also a video. 

I engaged them in a discussion about the id-- my main concerns being the solid tail (in the last photo) and the rather pale upperparts (scaps and back). LC emailed me the video for better viewing than on a phone. This provided some views that clearly showed a banded tail okay for LBBG. We then sent the images and video to Amar Ayyesh, an expert in the East familiar with separating 1st cycle LBBG from Herring-- relatively straight forward at close range but challenging at the distances we are typically dealing with at Yolo Landfill. Amar replied that it looks "pretty good" for LBB, noting the darker greater covert bases, long wings at rest, whitish breast, and tail band. He did have reservations about the paler post-juv scaps. 

I think, based on the video, that the bird was in the smaller water area on the east side of the landfill pond. This can be viewed from the levee above Rd 28H -- and you can walk down across the road right up to the fence. A scope is important. Unfortunately, with a north wind, the gulls are typically at the far north edge of the pond, so I recommend waiting until the wind dies down or turns to the south. 

LBBG has become annual in Yolo County, so a 1st cycle bird is expected-- though difficult to pick out. The adult LBBG is still around, usually sleeping among Calif Gulls in the vicinity of the long diagonal swale that cuts thru the pond. This adult bird is best picked out on an overcast day (when the true mantle colors are easier to discern), when all the birds are facing the same direction, and when you position yourself to be looking sideways at the birds. I've found it in a few minutes under these conditions.   

good birding, 

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Pine Siskin Salmonella deaths

Asher Perla
 

Hello birders,
I found a dead Pine Siskin in my yard in Yuba county today, seemingly sick with salmonella. I have taken down my feeders and warned other bird feeders in the neighborhood. I plan to keep them down until spring when the siskins migrate. 
Asher Perla
Oregon House


On Fri, Jan 22, 2021, 11:39 AM Sally M. Walters <bajaowl@...> wrote:
Apologies for this duplicate message and the late posting: There have been several emails noting Pine Siskins dying from Salmonella. While this is not normal, it has occurred in the past. The advice is to remove feeders and water for the next few weeks. I am now scattering seed in my yard in leaf duff and near shrubbery per advice below. 

California Department of Fish and Game posted this on their website as a reference.
REMOVE FEEDERS AND WATER for 14 days if you have dead or dying birds. Wash feeders and birdbaths with Clorox solution and wash your hands - Salmonella is everywhere. If the birds are alive contact your local Human Society.

National Audubon: "The best advice if you observe sick birds is to take down feeders [and remove water] to help the birds “social distance”. By taking feeders down for 14 days, we help the birds disperse and limit their exposure through concentrated feeding. Remember that the very best way to support birds in our yards and neighborhoods is with native plants and leaving leaf litter alone because natural foraging behavior doesn’t create the same high disease transmission risk that bird feeders do.” https://audubonportland.org/blog/help-pine-siskins-by-practicing-safe-bird-feeding/

Sally M Walters
Retired Wildlife Biologist
Past President of Sacramento Audubon



Cassin’s Finches in Redding.

Bob & Carol
 

Yesterday and today we had 2 males and 1 female and today 2 females and 1 male Cassin’s Finch at our feeders. Got some good pictures. Probably the first or one of the first records in the valley in Shasta County.

Sent From
Bob & Carol Yutzy
Redding, Ca


Broad-billed Hummingbird still present

Andy Engilis
 

The Broad-billed Hummingbird was still present today at noon in the yard at 319 Antioch Way, Davis.  As has been the case, the homeowners have been very accommodating and friendly.  There are instructions now on the gate to their backyard on how to access their yard.  The bird definitely uses feeders in other yards nearby as it would leave some duration every half hour or so.  At one point the bird sand a high whistled song in additiona to its buzzy calls.

 

Good Birding

 

Andy Engilis

UC Davis

 

Andrew Engilis, Jr.

Curator

Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology

Dept of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

One Shield Avenue

University of California

Davis, CA 95616

USA

 

Office Phone:  530-752-0364

Cell: 530-902-1881

FAX: 530-752-4154

E-mail:  aengilisjr@...

Website:  http://mwfb.ucdavis.edu

 


tropical kingbird continues

Michael Perrone
 

The tropical kingbird was at the south end of Reichmuth Park today at about 10 AM, first atop the easternmost sycamore along the street, then in a camphor tree to the east, then across Land Park Drive, joining a flock of berry-eaters--robins, waxwings, flickers and starlings--where I lost it.

Michael Perrone
Davis


Eastern phoebe

Sally M. Walters
 

Yesterday, saw eastern kingbird using yolo county listing by Bachetti. Other directions were ambiguous.

Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA


Tropical kingbird

Sally M. Walters
 

Still at reichmouth park. Silver lake road.

Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA


Tropical Kingbird at Reichmuth Park (SAC)

Chris Conard
 

Hi folks,

In case you haven't seen the eBird reports, Andrew Lee found a Tropical Kingbird at the south end of Reichmuth Park on Sunday and there were subsequent reports yesterday.
- Comments: "Right on Silver Lake Dr. at the south end...  Perched on a bare sycamore and never moved from that perch while I was observing. Frequent twittering calls was the only reason why it was found"

To my knowledge, this is the fourth county record:
The first was found on the Rio Cosumnes CBC in the mid-90s on the Bufferlands (to my chagrin, about a year before I started there). The rest have been much more recent.
The second was in Feb 2017 by Lindy Fung at Brannan Island.
The third and the first widely seen was 23 Nov 2019 into 2020 on Sherman Island first found by Max Brodie.

Take care,

Chris Conard
Sacramento


Red-necked Grebe — Placer/Sacramento Counties

Zeke VanZante
 

The Red-necked Grebe found by Adam Kucharek at Beals Point on January 10 continued yesterday and today. Today I saw it NW of the islands before it moved south into Sacramento County where it preceded to the base of the dike just East of the dam. Once there it slept and eventually dove a bit. For best viewing if it is in this location I wish I could suggest walking from Folsom Pt. but I don’t think you can cross the new secondary spillway so that probably wouldn’t work. It can be still seen from Beals with a scope if it is in Sacramento County as I and Gavin Stacey did today but it will probably be much more difficult as the water level rises. The bird was about here (38.706189, -121.151282) most of the time.
Also of note the Pacific Loons, Red-breasted Merganser, and White-winged Scoters are still around moving in and out of the counties.

eBird Checklists:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S80237730

Zeke VanZante
Roseville. CA


Re: Broad-billed Hummingbird in Davis

Kirk Swenson
 

The Broad-billed Hummingbird continued to show well off and on throughout the morning and early afternoon. Victoria and Thomas, the homeowners and original reporters of the bird, have been incredibly gracious in allowing dozens of birders access to the bird.

This morning the bird spent a fair amount of time perched in a bare tree in the front yard of the house next door, with occasional forays to nearby houses and across the street, so access to the backyard is not required to see the bird.

Moving forward, they request that those wishing to access the backyard ring the doorbell and they will open the gate. There is a sign on the back gate as a reminder. They have two friendly dogs, so the gate should be kept closed. Please be respectful in following these guidelines during reasonable hours of the day.

P.S. The bird apparently arrived on Friday after the storms. With the help of a friend they had identified it as a Broad-billed Hummingbird but were stymied by the process of adding a previously unrecorded species in the eBird interface, hence the entry as hummingbird sp. with a comment indicating it was a Broad-billed.

Good birding,
Kirk Swenson
Davis, CA

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 9:06 AM Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:
A BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRD is currently being seen in Davis, Yolo County.

Yesterday, Victoria Cross, a new birder, reported a  "hummingbird, sp." at her home in Davis on eBird. She included a photo. Her eBird post is here:

Lucas Corneliuson happened to be scanning thru eBird pics online and came across it. He notified the Yolo group that it is clearly a Broad-billed Hummingbird. 

This morning, at least two dozen of us converged on Antioch Street and found the bird-- which is beautiful. It has been extensively photographed by others (especially Bart Wickel). I recorded it singing and calling here: 

The Crosses, at 319 Antioch, are excited about their new hobby (who wouldn't be with this kind of start???) and are graciously allowing birders around their left side yard into the back yard, where birders may socially distance themselves around the pool-- the feeders are on the opposite side. No need to knock on their door. The bird also routinely comes into the trees in front of 315 and 319 Antioch, including the small bare tree in front of 319. Those homeowners were not yet awake when I was there, but of course use discretion, as this is in front of a window. 

I trust other birders will update on any changes to access and etiquette. 

This is a first county record and possibly a first Central Valley record. 

good birding, 

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: ID Help - Hummingbird

Steve Hampton
 

This is an Anna's Hummingbird based on the green flanks and stout sword-like bill. The gorget color on all hummers only show color at just the right angle of light. 



On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 9:53 AM Larry Jordan <thelarryjordan@...> wrote:
I posted this on Shasta Birders as well. I was at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Saturday (1.30.21) and as I was leaving about 2pm I photographed this hummingbird assuming it was an Anna's but wondered why I couldn't get any color in his throat. The bird was in a small tree in the corner of the swampy area right next to the back of the visitor center building where the mail boxes are located. I would like to get some suggestions on this species if possible.

Thanks,

Larry Jordan
Oak Run, CA



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


ID Help - Hummingbird

Larry Jordan
 

I posted this on Shasta Birders as well. I was at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Saturday (1.30.21) and as I was leaving about 2pm I photographed this hummingbird assuming it was an Anna's but wondered why I couldn't get any color in his throat. The bird was in a small tree in the corner of the swampy area right next to the back of the visitor center building where the mail boxes are located. I would like to get some suggestions on this species if possible.

Thanks,

Larry Jordan
Oak Run, CA


Broad-billed Hummingbird in Davis

Steve Hampton
 

A BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRD is currently being seen in Davis, Yolo County.

Yesterday, Victoria Cross, a new birder, reported a  "hummingbird, sp." at her home in Davis on eBird. She included a photo. Her eBird post is here:

Lucas Corneliuson happened to be scanning thru eBird pics online and came across it. He notified the Yolo group that it is clearly a Broad-billed Hummingbird. 

This morning, at least two dozen of us converged on Antioch Street and found the bird-- which is beautiful. It has been extensively photographed by others (especially Bart Wickel). I recorded it singing and calling here: 

The Crosses, at 319 Antioch, are excited about their new hobby (who wouldn't be with this kind of start???) and are graciously allowing birders around their left side yard into the back yard, where birders may socially distance themselves around the pool-- the feeders are on the opposite side. No need to knock on their door. The bird also routinely comes into the trees in front of 315 and 319 Antioch, including the small bare tree in front of 319. Those homeowners were not yet awake when I was there, but of course use discretion, as this is in front of a window. 

I trust other birders will update on any changes to access and etiquette. 

This is a first county record and possibly a first Central Valley record. 

good birding, 

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: small mystery raptor

Rick Williams
 

I had a Sharp-shinned Hawk which hung around my house a few years ago that had multiple white patches on its back. If you Google Sharp-shinned Hawks pics you will see examples of individuals with a lot of white on the back. Rick Williams, Woodland


--
Rick Williams, Woodland, CA


Re: small mystery raptor

szafrica77
 

Merlin?

Sarah Mayhew
Davis


On Jan 30, 2021, at 7:41 PM, Susan Harrison via groups.io <spharrison@...> wrote:



Hi all,

 

Today at Putah Creek Riparian Reserve (0.5 miles-ish east of Pedrick Road) I saw a raptor perched above the creek with these characteristics:

 

Kestrel-sized

Kestrel-like long barred tail, which it wagged from side to side

Dark slaty-gray back with several squarish white spots (strange!!)

Dark head/face without any kestrel-like facial markings

 

Does anyone have an idea of what this could be?  

 

Thanks!!

Susan Harrison 
Davis


Covid - birding

Christoph Randler
 

Dear birders,

Hope you all are fine; we are doing a short study how COVID-19 has changed birding. Please help us and answer a few questions, that take some minutes. You can also forward the link to others.

 

https://www.soscisurvey.de/birdwatchers/

 

The study is in several languages and we would be happy for your participation. The study is hosted by the University of Tübingen, and run by a team of people, also being birders.
For more information, please see my eBird profile below and/or the results of our first study in spring:

https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/19/7310

https://ebird.org/profile/NTM0NTM1/world

 

Stay healthy and good birding,

Christoph Randler (Tuebingen, DE), Jukka Jokimäki (Arctic Centre, Univ.of Lapland, Rovaniemi, FIN) & Piotr Tryjanowski (University of Life Sciences, Poznan, PL) and Maria de Salvo (Univ Catania, IT).

https://mobile.twitter.com/christophrandl1/status/1346357125623271424

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013695273575

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