Date   

100+ Swainson’s Hawks - Interstate 5 - Sacramento County

Paddlegal
 

A somewhat delayed message due to my misdirecting it in the first place.  

This afternoon (7/23/2020) as I was zipping along on northbound I- 5 at 2:15, I saw multiple irrigated fields filled with what mainly appeared to be Swainson’s Hawks on the ground.  This was on the East side of I-5 between Twin Cities Rd and Lambert Rd stretching across 3-4 fields.  Keep in mind at 70 mph, I did a fast estimate and feel that I was being conservative!  There was also a small kettle of Swainson’s above.

Quite spectacular and I’ve had similar sightings along Franklin Blvd in the past month between those two same roads.  Merely guessing but the fields seem to be alfalfa.

Farley Cross
Sacramento CA


Re: Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

Sally M. Walters
 

Camden Park is on the other side of the river from the ponds.  Someone mentioned a street view but not the street.  If that is known...
Sally M. Walters



On Jul 23, 2020, at 10:21 AM, Andy Engilis via groups.io <aengilisjr@...> wrote:

These ponds are part of the Sac-Yolo Mosquito Vector Control and not open for birding.  They are counted each Rio Cosumnes Christmas Count.
 
The ponds and wetlands on Camden Park behind these ponds actually can be god birding in winter.
 
Andy
 
 
Andrew Engilis, Jr.
Curator
Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology
Dept of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology
One Shield Avenue
University of California
Davis, CA 95616
USA
 
Office Phone:  530-752-0364
Cell: 530-902-1881
FAX: 530-752-4154
E-mail:  aengilisjr@...
 
From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Clifford Hawley via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 6:22 AM
To: centralvalleybirds@groups.io
Subject: Re: [centralvalleybirds] Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?
 
Hi Sally, 
 

Google Maps says that it is Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito & Vector Control. I'm guessing they are raising mosquitofish in those ponds. From the street view you can see at least some of the ponds through the fence from the sidewalk. I doubt that other access is possible. Good birding. 

Cliff Hawley 
Sacramento, CA 
 
On Thu, Jul 23, 2020, 6:12 AM Sally M. Walters <bajaowl@...> wrote:

Does anyone know what these ponds are? Looks like sewage treatment. Anyone know if they are open for birding?



Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA



-- 
Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning



Re: Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

Andy Engilis
 

These ponds are part of the Sac-Yolo Mosquito Vector Control and not open for birding.  They are counted each Rio Cosumnes Christmas Count.

 

The ponds and wetlands on Camden Park behind these ponds actually can be god birding in winter.

 

Andy

 

 

Andrew Engilis, Jr.

Curator

Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology

Dept of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

One Shield Avenue

University of California

Davis, CA 95616

USA

 

Office Phone:  530-752-0364

Cell: 530-902-1881

FAX: 530-752-4154

E-mail:  aengilisjr@...

Website:  http://mwfb.ucdavis.edu

 

From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Clifford Hawley via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 6:22 AM
To: centralvalleybirds@groups.io
Subject: Re: [centralvalleybirds] Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

 

Hi Sally, 

 

Google Maps says that it is Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito & Vector Control. I'm guessing they are raising mosquitofish in those ponds. From the street view you can see at least some of the ponds through the fence from the sidewalk. I doubt that other access is possible. Good birding. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA

 

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020, 6:12 AM Sally M. Walters <bajaowl@...> wrote:

Does anyone know what these ponds are? Looks like sewage treatment. Anyone know if they are open for birding?



Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA



--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Re: Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

naturestoc
 

I don't know if they are open for birding (I doubt it though). Cliff is correct, they do propagate and distribute mosquito fish there. I got a bunch for my small backyard pond.

Dan Brown,
Sacramento


-----Original Message-----
From: Sally M. Walters <bajaowl@...>
To: cvbirds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jul 22, 2020 11:22 pm
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

Does anyone know what these ponds are? Looks like sewage treatment. Anyone know if they are open for birding?



Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA



Re: Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

Clifford Hawley
 

Hi Sally, 

Google Maps says that it is Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito & Vector Control. I'm guessing they are raising mosquitofish in those ponds. From the street view you can see at least some of the ponds through the fence from the sidewalk. I doubt that other access is possible. Good birding. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA


On Thu, Jul 23, 2020, 6:12 AM Sally M. Walters <bajaowl@...> wrote:
Does anyone know what these ponds are? Looks like sewage treatment. Anyone know if they are open for birding?



Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA




--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Sewer Pond Birding, Elk Grove?

Sally M. Walters
 

Does anyone know what these ponds are? Looks like sewage treatment. Anyone know if they are open for birding?



Sally Walters Schmoldt
Sacramento CA


Re: Yolo County migration

Steve Hampton
 

I'll add that, just after I sent this email, Leo Edson arrived at the Woodland WTP along with 4 Black Terns with molting white faces. It was a noddy-like plumage I've never seen before. I've posted some digi-scoped pics here:  


 


On Wed, Jul 22, 2020 at 8:44 AM Steve Hampton via groups.io <stevechampton=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Fall migration is underway in Yolo County. 

Shorebird migration started, as usual, the last week of June. There is now decent habitat at both the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area and the Woodland Davis Clean Water Facility/Wastewater treatment plant. The large ponds on both sides of the road now have spits with mud flats. At both places, hundreds of Western and Least sandpipers and dozens of Semipalmated Plovers and Long-billed Dowitchers are the most common. Highlights in the past two weeks have been two adult Semipalmated Sandpipers and a Snowy Plover. To Peregrine falcons were at Yolo Bypass yesterday. There are also Bank Swallows mixed in at the Bypass.

In North Davis, a trickle of Rufous/Allen’s Hummingbirds (probably the former at this point), Pac-slope Flycatchers, Western Tanagers, Black-headed Grosbeaks, Bullock’s Orioles, and Orange-cr Warblers have been the norm for the past few weeks. Yesterday I had a pair of juvenile Hermit Warblers, which is not unusual for this time of year.

Good birding,


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Yolo County migration

Steve Hampton
 

Fall migration is underway in Yolo County. 

Shorebird migration started, as usual, the last week of June. There is now decent habitat at both the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area and the Woodland Davis Clean Water Facility/Wastewater treatment plant. The large ponds on both sides of the road now have spits with mud flats. At both places, hundreds of Western and Least sandpipers and dozens of Semipalmated Plovers and Long-billed Dowitchers are the most common. Highlights in the past two weeks have been two adult Semipalmated Sandpipers and a Snowy Plover. To Peregrine falcons were at Yolo Bypass yesterday. There are also Bank Swallows mixed in at the Bypass.

In North Davis, a trickle of Rufous/Allen’s Hummingbirds (probably the former at this point), Pac-slope Flycatchers, Western Tanagers, Black-headed Grosbeaks, Bullock’s Orioles, and Orange-cr Warblers have been the norm for the past few weeks. Yesterday I had a pair of juvenile Hermit Warblers, which is not unusual for this time of year.

Good birding,


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Cosumnes semipalmated sandpiper

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

There’s an adult semipalmated sandpiper now at the Cosumnes River Preserve in southern Sacramento County. It has a nice, short, blunt-tipped bill, making for relatively easy identification. It’s at the first pond north of Desmond Road about 400 meters east of the railroad tracks. It is in molt and pretty substantially advanced into basic plumage.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Re: Female Rose-Breasted Grosbeak Along Deer Creek

John Sterling
 

Sorry to say that the photo shows a Black-headed Grosbeak with a pink bill. 


John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

PO Box 1653
Woodland, CA 95776A

530 908-3836
jsterling@...
www.sterlingbirds.com

On Jul 17, 2020, at 3:50 PM, Adam Panto <norcalwood@...> wrote:

Here is my ebird checklist with pictures & a few more details if anybody is looking to try for this bird.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71572551

Adam Panto

Placerville 


Re: Female Rose-Breasted Grosbeak Along Deer Creek

Adam Panto
 

Here is my ebird checklist with pictures & a few more details if anybody is looking to try for this bird.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71572551

Adam Panto

Placerville 


Female Rose-Breasted Grosbeak Along Deer Creek

Adam Panto
 

This morning around 7:45, I had an adult female Rose-Breasted Grosbeak on the El Dorado Trail along Deer Creek. White supercilium (not buffy), a very pink bill & heavily streaked underparts. The bird was west of Latrobe Road, just before you get to the high railroad trestle. It’s just under a mile walk down the tracks from the pullout on Latrobe road. I got pictures that I will upload later to Ebird. She was associating loosely with an adult male Black Headed. Good luck! 


Here is a link to the closest ebird hotspot if you’re unfamiliar with the area.

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L3305338


Adam Panto

Placerville 


Lost scope - YBWA

Bart Wickel
 

It's a long shot, but I am hoping that someone in the community found my scope today along the South end of the July shorebird habitat at the Yolo bypass.

Please contact me by email if you have any information at bartwickel@...

Bart Wickel
Davis


Re: Thank you for your support of young birders

Dawn Garcia
 

Fiona, your post is wonderful for us who love birds, wildlife and their habitats. We know what we are leaving in your hands and thank you for stepping up and sharing your passion with us, hopeful, courageous, and joyful! Altacal Audubon Society is one of your supporters and we will share your gratitude with our members. Thank you so much for posting!
Dawn Garcia
Altacal Audubon Society


--
Dawn


"when I walk with nature, my joy is full, my soul is free!"
  Lola


Re: Thank you for your support of young birders

Frances Oliver
 

Fiona,

Congratulations & Thanks for this write-up, especially for the plug for our youth scholarships!  I did share it to our Facebook page the other day. But I will share this readable link. It’s been amazing to see you grow as a birder, and watch your progress in your journaling. Looking forward to more. Maybe we can arrange to place this article on the CVBC webpage. We will be in touch. 

Frances
CVBC Board Member. 

On Jul 9, 2020, at 10:53 AM, Fiona Gillogly <fionasongbird@...> wrote:


Dear Central Valley birders,

My name is Fiona Gillogly and I have been a Central Valley Bird Club Youth scholarship recipient for the past four years. When I was thirteen, the first bird camp I attended with this scholarship was Bird Identification by Song at the Sierra Nevada Field Campus, where I later met author, educator and naturalists extraordinaire John Muir Laws. He became the most amazing mentor and friend to me and introduced me to nature journaling. Since that day, I have kept a nature journal and I have found that it is one of my favorite parts of birding. I love to draw the birds that I see and get to know them even better through art. I just published my first article in Birding magazine about how nature journaling enhances my birding experience and makes birding even more fun. 

The Birding magazine web site doesn't have the issue available online to non-members, but I have a high-res PDF saved here that you can read:

I know that many of you have donated to the CVBC Youth Scholarship fund and I hope you will continue to do so. Your generosity helps many young birders like me have these incredible and life changing experiences in nature. Thank you so much. 
If you would like to donate to that scholarship fund, you can click on the red donate button in the upper right corner of this page: www.cvbirds.org.
Thank you for your support of me and so many other young birders. I could not have attended these camps without your support. 
--Fiona 


Thank you for your support of young birders

Fiona Gillogly
 

Dear Central Valley birders,

My name is Fiona Gillogly and I have been a Central Valley Bird Club Youth scholarship recipient for the past four years. When I was thirteen, the first bird camp I attended with this scholarship was Bird Identification by Song at the Sierra Nevada Field Campus, where I later met author, educator and naturalists extraordinaire John Muir Laws. He became the most amazing mentor and friend to me and introduced me to nature journaling. Since that day, I have kept a nature journal and I have found that it is one of my favorite parts of birding. I love to draw the birds that I see and get to know them even better through art. I just published my first article in Birding magazine about how nature journaling enhances my birding experience and makes birding even more fun. 

The Birding magazine web site doesn't have the issue available online to non-members, but I have a high-res PDF saved here that you can read:

I know that many of you have donated to the CVBC Youth Scholarship fund and I hope you will continue to do so. Your generosity helps many young birders like me have these incredible and life changing experiences in nature. Thank you so much. 
If you would like to donate to that scholarship fund, you can click on the red donate button in the upper right corner of this page: www.cvbirds.org.
Thank you for your support of me and so many other young birders. I could not have attended these camps without your support. 
--Fiona 


Another early Yolo migrant warbler

Joan Humphrey
 

Hi Birders,

I was surprised this morning to hear warbler chipping at the house next door. From within the cork oak it sure sounded like a Black-throated Gray Warbler. It continued to forage and chip and was eventually seen and confirmed.  According to the local checklist there are no prior records for this species in the first ten days of July.

Good birding,

Joan Humphrey
Davis, CA


Re: Federal Migratory Bird Stamp on Sale

Larry Jordan
 

I should also mention for the benefit of bird photographers, we are very lucky here in northern California to have photo blinds in three of our local wildlife refuges, two at Sacramento NWR, one at Colusa NWR, and one at Delevan NWR. I am overjoyed to contribute to these refuges by reserving at least one of these blind opportunities (usually 2 or 3) at the same price of a Duck Stamp, $25. https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Sacramento/visitor_activities/photography.html

Larry Jordan
Oak Run, CA


Re: Federal Migratory Bird Stamp on Sale

John Harris
 

Another alternative is to buy the duck stamp from American Birding Association.
John Harris
Oakdale, CA


On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 3:35 PM Larry Jordan <thelarryjordan@...> wrote:
The FWS does NOT track whether those that purchase the stamp are hunters or birders and that is one of the basic problems that they have getting birders to buy it. A small group of birders and photographers spent several years trying to advance an alternate "Wildlife Conservation Stamp" (see my informative post from 2012).  It seems so obvious since a 2011 survey by the USFWS counted 71.1 million wildlife watchers in the US and only 13.7 million hunters, that they could substantially increase funding by giving wildlife watchers, birders and photographers a better reason to purchase the "duck stamp."

Way before our attempt at getting FWS to get more birders involved, Paul Baicich, founder of "Friends of the Migratory Duck Stamp" along with (I believe) Kenn Kaufman and Kenneth Able, went to Washington DC to promote the same idea to no avail.

If birders and wildlife watchers want more say in the way our National Wildlife Refuges are managed, the least the USFWS can do to get birders to buy the stamp is simply ask the buyer, even if via a simple check box or question if purchasing over the phone, if you are a birder or hunter, or both!

To make the situation even worse, "Beginning in 2020, the Contest will include a permanent theme of “celebrating our waterfowl hunting heritage,” and it will be mandatory that each entry include an appropriate waterfowl hunting scene and/or accessory." This is the reason this year's stamp shows a beautiful Wood Duck drake AND a decoy.

One of the reasons for reduced funding for our refuges is the decline of waterfowl hunters. The USFWS needs to wake up and instead of changing the Duck Stamp rules to include more hunting imagery, figure out how to encourage more birders and wildlife photographers to get involved by giving us credit when we purchase the stamp.

Larry Jordan
Oak Run, CA


Re: Federal Migratory Bird Stamp on Sale

Larry Jordan
 

The FWS does NOT track whether those that purchase the stamp are hunters or birders and that is one of the basic problems that they have getting birders to buy it. A small group of birders and photographers spent several years trying to advance an alternate "Wildlife Conservation Stamp" (see my informative post from 2012).  It seems so obvious since a 2011 survey by the USFWS counted 71.1 million wildlife watchers in the US and only 13.7 million hunters, that they could substantially increase funding by giving wildlife watchers, birders and photographers a better reason to purchase the "duck stamp."

Way before our attempt at getting FWS to get more birders involved, Paul Baicich, founder of "Friends of the Migratory Duck Stamp" along with (I believe) Kenn Kaufman and Kenneth Able, went to Washington DC to promote the same idea to no avail.

If birders and wildlife watchers want more say in the way our National Wildlife Refuges are managed, the least the USFWS can do to get birders to buy the stamp is simply ask the buyer, even if via a simple check box or question if purchasing over the phone, if you are a birder or hunter, or both!

To make the situation even worse, "Beginning in 2020, the Contest will include a permanent theme of “celebrating our waterfowl hunting heritage,” and it will be mandatory that each entry include an appropriate waterfowl hunting scene and/or accessory." This is the reason this year's stamp shows a beautiful Wood Duck drake AND a decoy.

One of the reasons for reduced funding for our refuges is the decline of waterfowl hunters. The USFWS needs to wake up and instead of changing the Duck Stamp rules to include more hunting imagery, figure out how to encourage more birders and wildlife photographers to get involved by giving us credit when we purchase the stamp.

Larry Jordan
Oak Run, CA

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