Date   

Re: White winged Dove in Sacramento county

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

Kevin Thomas and I saw the white-winged dove at the spot described by Mr. Ewing at 13:15 today.  Thanks Marc and Gil.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento

On Fri, Jan 24, 2020 at 10:48 AM Gil Ewing <gewing1@...> wrote:

Hi everyone

Marc Fenner has discovered a White-winged Dove among the many Mourning and Eurasian Collared Doves on Meiss Rd. This is on the far west end of Meiss west of Dillard and west of the big plantation house. It was seen in the oaks and eucalyptuses just before the small green home of the right at 12951 Meiss. It was still there as of 1048am. I will be spreading millet seed by the road there

Gil Ewing
FairOaks CA Sacramento County





--
John Trochet
Sacramento, California
trochetj@...


White winged Dove in Sacramento county

Gil Ewing
 

Hi everyone

Marc Fenner has discovered a White-winged Dove among the many Mourning and Eurasian Collared Doves on Meiss Rd. This is on the far west end of Meiss west of Dillard and west of the big plantation house. It was seen in the oaks and eucalyptuses just before the small green home of the right at 12951 Meiss. It was still there as of 1048am. I will be spreading millet seed by the road there

Gil Ewing
FairOaks CA Sacramento County


Continuing Tanzanite Park rarities

Gil Ewing
 

The link didn’t go through the first time.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S63706056


From: Gilmer C Ewing <gewing1@...>
Subject: Continuing Tanzanite Park rarities
Date: January 23, 2020 at 1:13:40 PM PST

Hey everyone

The Vermilion Flycatcher and the Clay-colored Sparrow that have been seen by many at Tanzanite Park in Sacramento earlier this winter have not been reported by many people lately, so I thought I’d post that both were still there this morning.
The following link to an eBird checklist has photos and some possibly helpful details.

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA


Continuing Tanzanite Park rarities

Gil Ewing
 

Hey everyone

The Vermilion Flycatcher and the Clay-colored Sparrow that have been seen by many at Tanzanite Park in Sacramento earlier this winter have not been reported by many people lately, so I thought I’d post that both were still there this morning.
The following link to an eBird checklist has photos and some possibly helpful details.

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA


Re: American Redstart, valley barred owl

John Ehrenfeld
 

Government agency decision aside (which I don't agree with),  My heart breaks for this magnificent raptor. From a life of freedom and self-determination in nature to being in a cage the rest of it's life. I was so privileged to see it in the wild.

John Ehrenfeld
Napa


clay-colored sparrow

Michael Perrone
 

The clay-colored sparrow continued in trees at and near 2201 Tanzanite Ave in Natomas this morning, mainly in the company of juncos, including a striking male slate-colored.  Patience was required, as the bird went missing for longish periods.

  We did not find the vermillion flycatcher that has been reported in the adjacent park.

Michael Perrone and John Hansen
Davis


Re: American Redstart, valley barred owl

Joan Humphrey
 

   Regarding the Yolo Barred Owl  

Turns out for this first valley floor bird, the agencies requested a permanent home in a licensed facility.  The California Raptor Center said they were willing, so the Barred Owl will be making its home there. I think it will eventually be in one of the self-tour display cages. Hopefully it will adapt well to captivity.  It is reported to have a good appetite.

Good birding,

Joan Humphrey
Davis, CA

On Sunday, January 19, 2020, 07:39:02 AM PST, Dawn Garcia <avifan59@...> wrote:


Hi, it will surprise me if the barred owl is released in the area. It’s not a secret that agencies and private companies are “removing” (killing) the owls in nearby forests including our area national forests. Science shows they are  threatening populations of spotted owl by breeding and/or displacing them from their territories.  I am not stating an opinion, just facts.
Dawn Garcia
Oroville, CA
--
Dawn


"when I walk with nature, my joy is full, my soul is free!"
  Lola


Mountain bluebirds

Dan Applebee
 

I saw 24 mountain bluebirds on the south side of Meiss Road, Sacramento County this afternoon about 14:00 hrs. Most were on a barbed wire fence running south perpendicular to the road about 2,000’ west of Dillard Road but a few were on the roadside power lines. There were also about 4,000 tricolored blackbirds in the fields on both sides of the road just west of the bluebirds.

I also had a juvenile ferruginous hawk on Boys Colony Road visible at the top of the hill looking west from the intersection with Latrobe Road.

Dan Applebee
Folsom


hybrid sapsucker

Doug Herr
 

My yard seems to be a magnet for hybrid Red-naped x Red-breasted Sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis x ruber).  This is not the first winter this bird, or one like it, has inhabited my yard.  Photos:


18 January 2020, Orangevale, Sacramento County

Doug Herr


Re: Tule Greater White-fronted Geese

Leo Edson
 

Yesterday, thanks to Steve's post and subsequent eBird reports by others, I was able to locate a loose group, or two groups in close proximity, of Tule White-fronted Geese (total of 19 birds) just east of the southwest corner of the Colusa NWR auto loop. The can be almost hard to miss when you know what field marks and behavioral characteristics to look for.

I recommend that anyone with more than just a casual interest in this subject at least skim this excellent publication on the results of a recent White-fronted Goose genetic study:


--
Leo Edson
Sacramento


Looking for Yolo County owl locations for Duck Days field trip

maryolo1
 

I'm again looking for locations publicly accessible, which are fairly close to Davis for the Duck Days field trip in February. The owl species we include are Burrowing, Barn, Great Horned, Short-eared, and Western Screech.  In rare years we can get a staked-out Long-eared Owl.
 
In the event of multiple location choices we opt for easier traffic routes and easier pullout parking.  In recent years we have had two groups, launching 15 minutes apart and visiting the first locations in shifts, followed by blending the two groups for the later locations.  We return to the YBWA Headquarters after dark, but participants can peel off early as needed.
 
This year my co-leaders are leading a different trip, so there will be only one group for owling unless one or more birders would like to take on the leadership division to have two groups.  Any takers?
 
Mary Schiedt
Davis
530-400-7094 (cell and text)


Re: American Redstart, valley barred owl

Dawn Garcia
 

Hi, it will surprise me if the barred owl is released in the area. It’s not a secret that agencies and private companies are “removing” (killing) the owls in nearby forests including our area national forests. Science shows they are  threatening populations of spotted owl by breeding and/or displacing them from their territories.  I am not stating an opinion, just facts.
Dawn Garcia
Oroville, CA
--
Dawn


"when I walk with nature, my joy is full, my soul is free!"
  Lola


Re: Yolo Barred Owl

Joan Humphrey
 

Hi Birders,

Here's an update on the Yolo Barred Owl. I know a lot of us have been on hold waiting for the bird to get back on its territory.  The owl continues well, with a healthy weight, and is eating okay in captivity.  It has not been aged, sexed or banded.

After getting thoroughly drenched, chilled, and tangled in some fine fishpond netting last Sunday night (after catching a fish!), the Barred Owl was taken to the California Raptor Center.  This otherwise healthy bird needed to stay there Monday night to finish drying out as it had been very wet, but the raptor center was hoping for a very quick turnaround.

Since this bird is a valley floor first, word of it traveled fast.  The California Raptor Center was contacted by its permitting agencies (California Dept of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) instructing that the Barred Owl not be released pending development of a management plan since it can be regarded as an invasive species.  They are also interested in learning such things as to what subspecies this owl belongs and how old is it and would probably like to do a DNA test to get some answers.

Please realize that the Raptor Center has been placed on hold here also.  It will be the permitting agencies that will decide IF OR WHEN this bird will be released.  Concerns or questions would best be directed to the agencies (California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), although I don't have any particular contact information.

Good Birding,

Joan Humphrey
Davis, CA

On Monday, January 13, 2020, 11:37:45 AM PST, Emmett Iverson via Groups.Io <emmettscotti@...> wrote:


Hi,

Gregg Schwab reported this morning that the Barred Owl was taken to the UC Davis raptor center after being entangled in a net at a south Davis fish pond. All the info that I have for now. Will try and update the listserv when more is known.


Good birding,

Emmett Iverson 
Winters 




On Sunday, January 12, 2020, 3:37 PM, Emmett Iverson via Groups.Io <emmettscotti@...> wrote:

Hi all,

For the last couple of days homeowners around Willowbank Ditch have photographed the Barred Owl seen back in December. It was circulated on the Yolo WhatsApp but was finally refound by Sean Smith this afternoon. It is currently being seen on the willowbank ditch bike path, best accessed by parking on Lillard and walking through Putah Creek Park. This bird will likely have changed its roost spot by tomorrow but it does continue and is being seen on public property. 

Good birding,

Emmett Iverson 
Winters, Ca 




Re: American Redstart @ Mokelumne Fish Hatchery, SJ Co.

linda gal
 

Liz West, and I joined up with Kurt Mize down from Mokulmne fish hatchery and Kurt spotted the American Redstart across the river from where (we believe) David originally saw the bird.  Enclosed are some seriously cropped pics.  Thanks Kurt for the spot! :) 

Linda Gal 
Sacramento, CA 
 
DSC_5851ec AMERICAN REDSTART profile.jpg
DSC_5963ec AMERICAN REDSTART flying.jpg

On Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 11:09 AM Frances Oliver <hummer52@...> wrote:
Posting for David Yee:

It’s 1030 AM, and I just found a female type American Redstart at Mokelumne Fish Hatchery at the main fishing spot and it's just a foraging along the edge of the little pond area where it’s kind of calm. It’s in the same area where the 3 male Barrow’s Goldeneyes are. The redstart is feeding very actively and not moving from the area.

Good birding!
Frances for David Yee
Lodi, CA




Stale Report - Possible Winter Wren at Bannon Creek Park in Sacramento

Dan Williams
 

It's come to my attention that a bird I found in Natomas on the SAC CBC on 12/21 and identified as a Pacific Wren, may in fact have been a WINTER WREN. Folks with more experience in separating these two fairly recently split species are looking at the pics and listening to the recordings to try to confirm.

It was singing in a blackberry bramble along Bannon Creek. We observed it and filmed it from the footbridge near the large picnic shelter near the intersection of Azevedo and Bannon Creek Drive.

I went by last week to see if I could re-find it and didn't turn it up, but it may be wintering at this spot so could be worth trying for if you're in the area. I apologize for not getting the word out earlier, but was unaware of the possibility that this was a rarity.

Dan Williams
Carmichael


American Redstart @ Mokelumne Fish Hatchery, SJ Co.

Frances Oliver
 

Posting for David Yee:

It’s 1030 AM, and I just found a female type American Redstart at Mokelumne Fish Hatchery at the main fishing spot and it's just a foraging along the edge of the little pond area where it’s kind of calm. It’s in the same area where the 3 male Barrow’s Goldeneyes are. The redstart is feeding very actively and not moving from the area.

Good birding!
Frances for David Yee
Lodi, CA


SAC Bufferlands portion of the Rio Cosumnes CBC on 2 Jan 2020

Chris Conard
 

Hi folks,

Surely more info here than many want, but some have found this of interest in the past. Below is a summary of findings I put together for our work group and volunteers on the Bufferlands portion (www.bufferlands.com) of the Rio Cosumnes CBC.

 

On Thursday, January 2, 2020, seven Bufferlands staff and nine volunteers participated in the 25th annual Rio Cosumnes Christmas Bird Count (CBC). The day started with low fog and 41F, but was mostly sunny for much of the day, with up to 6 mph wind and a high of 60F. For the fourth year in a row we had six teams in the field, allowing very thorough coverage. There was only limited flooding, allowing good access to most of the property. The Bufferlands is at the northwestern portion of the 15-mile diameter CBC circle that includes Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Cosumnes River Preserve, western Elk Grove, northwestern Galt, and a portion of Merritt Island in Yolo County.

 

From 7:05 am to 5:34 pm, we recorded 108 species on the Bufferlands, within a historic range of 90 to 120, and counted 103,227 individual birds (90,000 were European Starlings), within a historic range of 7,723 to 811,644 (average 180,580). In 2002 our team began covering Beach Lake Forest, Beach Lake Park, and the ag lands owned by the District on the west side of I-5 in our count area. Since that time we have recorded an average of 111 species, within a range of 104 to 120, and a cumulative total of 161 species over the count’s 25 years. I haven’t received a full summary of what other areas recorded, but the whole circle often produces over 150 species.

 

An early evening flock of Snow Geese was a good pick up of a species missed by our team over half the time. Two Tundra Swans was another near miss, while we did miss Cackling Geese for the first time since 2005 (prior to which they were considered part of a complex of small Canada Goose subspecies). Overall waterfowl numbers were below average, but highlights included 973 Ring-necked Ducks, a paltry five Canvasbacks (we have recorded thousands), and eight Lesser Scaup was a good local total of a species we miss about half the time; we didn’t find any Redheads. Hooded Mergansers keep increasing, with a new high of 28, while we missed Common Mergansers for only the fifth time; they have declined in recent years on the property, perhaps because of shallower water in Morrison Creek caused by siltation.

 

Wild Turkeys were first recorded on our portion of the count in 2003, but numbers continue to grow, with a new record of 487 (up from last year’s record of 348). Ring-necked Pheasants remain at low numbers, with only six (the same total as the past two years) after a high of over 400 in 1996, seemingly out of some foggy past, but not that long ago; this species is declining throughout the region. We missed American Bitterns for the sixth time, Green Herons for the ninth time, and Black-crowned Night-Herons also for the ninth time; all three species are getting hard to find on the property in recent years, though only American Bitterns are declining throughout the region.

 

Overall raptor numbers were about average. A late afternoon pickup of a Prairie Falcon, plus two Peregrine Falcons (for just the fifth time, but all in recent years), two Merlins, and 20 American Kestrels made for a four falcon day (a Merlin was observed diving after sparrows flushed by a Northern Harrier. Despite dozens of dives, neither species appeared to catch anything). Burrowing Owls, at three, were down from last year’s five, but two Burrowing Owls we have regularly seen were not detected on count day. Despite steep declines in Sacramento County and the region, this species is holding on at the Bufferlands—especially in winter. Sandhill Cranes were a surprising miss, though we did see them count week (which includes three days before and three days after count day). We found five Sora and two Virginia Rails, but we missed Common Gallinule for just the fourth time; we no longer expect to find 30 or more gallinules as we did in the first 10 years of the count when the Constructed Wetlands was more fully flooded (Why are they not regular at Fishhead Lake where the habitat seems great for them?).

 

Shorebird numbers were quite low. We found a single Black-necked Stilt, 57 Least Sandpipers, only two Dunlin, and missed Long-billed Dowitchers. The Western Sandpiper seen count week (12/31) failed to appear on count day. We missed Black-bellied Plover for the ninth year in a row; development of adjacent areas where these birds used to forage likely explains this change, but there have also been regional and global declines of many shorebirds. We found one Long-billed Curlew, but we no longer expect dozens as we did over ten years ago—also likely tied to regional development. We found three Spotted Sandpipers, a regular species at the wastewater treatment plant, but difficult to find in the rest of the count circle. Of the three regular gull species (California, Ring-billed, and Herring gulls), we missed Ring-billed for only the second time (only ten total gulls were recorded on the property on count day).

 

Two species that have declined since 2005 when West Nile Virus (WNV) arrived in our area, Yellow-billed Magpie (just 20 this year) and Loggerhead Shrike (three), continued at low numbers. We recorded only one Oak Titmouse, another species that appears to be impacted by WNV. By contrast, Common Ravens are increasing: six this year was a new high. Also increasing, 17 Say’s Phoebes were double the historic average, and this is consistent with overall increasing regional abundance of this species—one of the few open country/grassland species that is not declining regionally.

 

Most teams reported lower than average songbird activity. Sparrow numbers were mostly average our slightly below, but with Savannah Sparrows (229) at their third highest total bucking a general declining trend. We missed Horned Larks, which used to be regular, but are now fairly sporadic on the property (we did have a single calling flyover for count week)—another open country species that is declining.

 

Also notable was a new high of Anna’s Hummingbirds at 73. A single Hutton’s Vireo, two Pacific Wrens, a White-throated Sparrow, and two Townsend’s Warblers were nice pickups of species that could easily be missed. We had a nice total of Golden-crowned Kinglets (17), but Rock Wren, Brown Creeper, and Varied Thrush failed to show. The large roost in the WTP Clarifiers accounted for most of the individual birds, with 90,000 European Starlings continuing as the most abundant species on the property (87% of individual birds counted). No new species were added to the cumulative species count (161) this time.

 

It is interesting to note how much year to year variation there has been. Of the 161 species recorded over 25 years of counts, 58 species (38%) have never been missed, with another 29 (18%) missed one to five times (totaling 87 species (54%) that have been missed five times or fewer). By contrast, 18 species (11%) have been recorded only once, with an additional 14 (9%) recorded two to five times (for a total of 32 species (20%) that have been recorded on five or fewer counts). With that amount of variability, it seems remarkable that the number of species found each count has varied rather little (104 to 120) since we began covering the property in pretty much the same way in 2002.

 

Thanks to everyone who participated in another great count. This 25-year data set reflects the only day each year that we search the whole property for birds. It is a valuable snapshot of our wintering bird population and part of the CBC tradition (https://www.regionalsan.com/general-information/christmas-bird-count). More background on the Rio Cosumnes CBC can be found here (http://www.cvbirds.org/bulletin/downloads/volume-09/); scroll down to the count in the summary articles.

 

All the best,

 

Chris

 

Chris Conard

Natural Resource Specialist

SRWTP Bufferlands

8521 Laguna Station Rd.

Elk Grove, CA  95758

(916) 876-9700 office

(916) 203-1610 cell

www.bufferlands.com



Folsom CBC Summary, 29 Dec 2019

Chris Conard
 


Hi folks,

We ran the 42nd Folsom Christmas Bird Count on December 29, 2019, on a cool, overcast day, with up to 8 mph wind. The forecast rain did not come until most teams were wrapping up for the day. We had 76 counters in 32 teams, both above average, but down slightly from last year's record participation. Five parties did some owling. The species total was 143 (if including Mute Swan), outside the historic range of 123 and last year's high of 148. Numbers were down for many species, probably owing to the cool weather with a storm threatening. Unlike counts on the flats of the Valley, this count struggles to come up with a good showing of waterfowl. We had a single Greater White-fronted Goose and three Cackling Geese, but missed Snow Geese and Tundra Swans. Invasive Mute Swan numbers are growing with a new high of 61. Duck diversity was lower than hoped, with misses of Lesser Scaup, Canvasback, and Northern Pintail, though we did pick up two Cinnamon Teal. For the second year in a row, we recorded only one Wood Duck. Barrow's Goldeneye were surprising low at only 20, while Hooded Mergansers were up at an impressive 43. 

The most shocking result for the count was two species missed for the first time: Loggerhead Shrike and Horned Lark. Shrikes have been declining (first falling below five in 1995, but holding on in single digits until this year). Horned Larks have also been declining with loss of habitat to development, and possibly other factors, but a complete miss is really unexpected; a few larks were found count week.

We missed Ring-necked Pheasant as we often do, along with American Bittern, though a single Black-crowned Night-Heron was a nice pick up. On a count that typically has low shorebird diversity, we missed Long-billed Dowitchers, but two Dunlin were good finds. Among over 17,000 total gulls, highlights included a single Mew Gull, an adult Glaucous Gull, and a good total of 36 Iceland (Thayer's) Gulls. Five Common Loons accounted for the only loon species reported. 

We found two Osprey and an impressive 14 Bald Eagles (attempting to avoid double-counting), plus seven Ferruginous Hawks, and an impressive six Rough-legged Hawks. A Golden Eagle was a nice surprise for a species increasingly missed. Sticking with birds of prey, we found five Merlins, five Prairie Falcons, and three Peregrine Falcons. A single Barn Owl could have easily been missed, and we found two Burrowing Owls and one Western Screech-Owl. It is yet another winter with paltry totals of Lewis's Woodpeckers and only one was found. A single Hairy Woodpeckers was a nice pick up.

Yellow-billed Magpies were up modestly to 65. At 46, Common Ravens came in one shy of the record, while one Steller's Jay was a nice find. We found one Brown Creeper, one Red-breasted Nuthatch, and two Golden-crowned Kinglets--all easy to miss--plus four Blue-gray Gnatcatchers. Four Varied Thrushes could have easily been missed, along with a single White-throated Sparrow and one Common Yellowthroat. We missed Chipping Sparrows after they had become almost reliable. Two Bell's Sparrows and eight Lawrence's Goldfinches were both excellent finds on private property. Purple Finches had a good showing with 48, but 93 Pine Siskins were a surprise in a season where they don't seem widespread. We found 13 Tricolored Blackbirds--a species increasingly easy to miss in rapidly expanding Folsom.

Thanks to all who participated and especially to the area leaders who do a lot of extra work organizing their teams.

Looking back at previous count data often has me turning to the 2006 volume of the CV Bird Club Bulletin devoted to CV CBCs:
http://www.cvbirds.org/bulletin/downloads/volume-09/    

All the best,

Chris Conard
Sacramento


Mountain Bluebirds in Sacramento Co.

Gil Ewing
 

The largest flock of Mountain Bluebirds I have ever seen in Sacramento Co., 45 birds, was found on Meiss Rd today. These were not close to to the road and would require a scope for satisfactory looks.
The flock was seen south of the road, on the section of Meiss Rd. that is WEST of Dillard Rd., on the huge irrigation equipment and the perpendicular fence that is opposite and past the big white plantation-style walled mansion.

I saw no bluebirds of any species on the 7-mile stretch of Meiss Rd. EAST of Dillard Rd.

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA


SE Sacramento County highlights

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

I received permission to visit a private ranch in far southeastern Sacramento County today.  So I spent a full day walking mostly woodland and savanna habitats, plus driving some more purely grassland areas.  These were the avian highlights:

common poorwill-  1 (I have seen this species there in February before, but never this early)
golden eagle-  1
bald eagle-  1
rough-legged hawk-  1
ferruginous hawk-  6
Lewis's woodpecker-  27
merlin-  1
prairie falcon-  1
loggerhead shrike-  5
mountain bluebird-  4
phainopepla-  6
purple finch-  16
Lawrence's goldfinch-  2
rufous-crowned sparrow-  3

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento

961 - 980 of 24443