Date   

L McC turns 100

Gil Ewing
 

Hello fellow birders

I could be risking my future access to CV Birds by posting something not involving a rare bird report, but this one time is worth the risk.
Please congratulate Louise McCullough, the Grande Dame and Queen Mother of Sacramento 
birding, on reaching her 100th birthday. Fantastic!!!

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA







Least Terns back at Sacramento Reg WTP (search opportunity)

Chris Conard
 

Hi folks,

For the 10th time in the past 12 years, Least Terns are nesting at the Sacramento Regional WTP in Elk Grove. The site has restricted access, but I'm looking to arrange a few chances to see them. Please let me know by e-mail if you're interested (and times that you are free) and I'll send directions and details. The first chance will be 10am tomorrow (6/2).

Only one pair of this typically colonial species has nested each time, though a second pair was observed earlier this week. They nest in gravel roads between treatment ponds. Details on the establishment of this nesting site are here: http://www.cvbirds.org/bulletin/downloads/volume-12/

Chris Conard
Sacramento


RFI about a Placer County hotspot

Brewbird
 

I was wondering about parking for the Linda Creek Open Space in Roseville. It’s not too far from my mom’s house and I’d like to bird it when I come down to visit her. Where does everyone park to access it? I was thinking of parking at Maidu Regional Park and walking back to it, but if there is a better access point, I’d like to know. Thanks!

Michele Swartout
Red Bluff

“In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks.”- John Muir


Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area is OPEN

Steve Hampton
 

I just got a call from Mary Schiedt, who's away from her computer at the moment. The news: at long last all the repairs are done and the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area is OPEN!!!

I have no idea what the water levels are-- and too late for most of spring migration, but nevertheless everything should be checked. Also, don't forget to look for Grasshopper Sparrows down around Lot H; they've bred in that area before. I have a simple map at http://www.tertial.us/yolobirds/yolo.html.

good birding, 


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


chat and Nashville warbler at Sacramento Bypass

Michael Perrone
 

This morning along the north levee of the Sacramento Bypass, a yellow-breasted chat was singing continuously from near the top of a set of bare snags about 100 yards east of where the road makes a sharp turn and leaves the levee.  This behavior suggests a territorial bird.

A bit west of the chat, a Nashville warbler sang occasionally.  This species is irregular (that is, not every year) in Yolo County in late May.  For a male to be here this late offers the possibility that it was a vagrant of the eastern race.

Michael Perrone
Davis


green-tailed towhee at Grasslands Regional Park, Yolo Co.

Michael Perrone
 

A green-tailed towhee was at the park at about 9:45 AM today, May 28, foraging at the edge of the wide central path that separates the two archery ranges north of the headquarters area.  It was near the south end of the path, at first with Swainson's thrushes and a robin, then by itself.  There are two prior spring records for Yolo County, in mid- and late May.

Michael Perrone and Sonjia Shelly
Davis


Cosumnes River Preserve / White Slough (PAAS Field Trip report)

Matthew Dodder
 

I led my Palo Alto Adult School birding class to Cosumnes River Preserve yesterday, for a morning of birding. We began on the marsh trail, then crossed the road and returned to the visitors center by way of the river trail and adjacent meadow.

Highlights were the numerous SWAINSON’S HAWKS that were seen in both dark and intermediate morphs. The Swainson’s Hawks outnumbered the RED-TAILED HAWKS by at least 3-to-1, which is especially fun for our South Bay group! We admired three WOOD DUCKS in the large pond between the rail road tracks and visitors center—two brilliant males, and one female. There was also a single male BLUE-WINGED TEAL in the same area. Along the south end of our loop we saw one CATTLE EGRET in full breeding plumage, and conveniently positioned beside both SNOWY and GREAT EGRET for comparison.

We continued a bit south toward the dead end of the trail and saw nesting NUTTALL’S WOODPECKER, heard PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER, BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, and WARBLING VIREO. We had our lunch on the visitors center balcony, hoping to study the Hummingbirds at the feeders, but the feeders were empty. Luckily, the flowers along the pavement were attracting birds and we saw several ANNA’S HUMMINGBIRDS and two BLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRDS.

After the class broke up, two cars wished to visit White Slough on their way home. There we spent just enough time to locate BLUE GROSBEAK in the meadowy area near the first pond. It was a first summer male, singing and calling, but lacking the full blue breast. Instead, it showed a buffy breast that at first made it looks a bit like a Western Bluebird. A second BLUE GROSBEAK called from the trees near the cars. A single SWAINSON’S THRUSH called from the dense cover near the parked cars, but eluded view. YELLOW WARBLER was briefly seen here as well.

Matthew Dodder
Mountain View


Re: Black Swift- Carmichael, CA 5/21/19

Brewbird
 

I thought I was seeing things at first, but I had 2 fly over me while out at Paynes Creek Wetlands this evening.

Michele Swartout
Red Bluff

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." - John Muir.

On May 21, 2019, at 18:34, Clifford Hawley <yellowhammerCA@...> wrote:

Hi CV birders, 

About 20 minutes ago I had a Black Swift in Carmichael over the soccer fields just south of the Koobs Nature Area between Engle and Gibbons and west of Garfield Ave. I have been scanning the skies all day because the other times I've found Black Swift was during this kind of unsettled weather. The very large, all-dark swift was riding the winds without much flapping. I only saw a few shallow wingbeats. It passed over the Koobs Nature Area and headed north. Good luck and good birding. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA

--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Birder Survey

John Sterling
 

Birders,
Please take a few minutes and take this online survey about birders developed by Terry Rich. I just did and it is relatively easy and quick as far as surveys go. 

thanks,

John

Hi John,

As I think you know, I am a life-long birder and professional ornithologist. I’m currently a PhD candidate in Public Policy at Boise State University. My research is focused on how birders contribute to bird conservation. Results will be used to improve public policies for bird conservation.

 

I’m asking you to please distribute my online survey link to your members so that I can collect important data from your geographic area.

 

 

Attached is a cover letter with more details. There is also a brief description at the outset of the survey itself. If you have an eBird account, you are welcome to check my eBird profile for more details on my own dedication to birding (https://ebird.org/profile/MTk4MzU4/world). 

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions. 

Thanks! 

--
Terrell D. Rich
Department of Administration and Public Policy
Boise State University


Black Swift- Carmichael, CA 5/21/19

Clifford Hawley
 

Hi CV birders, 

About 20 minutes ago I had a Black Swift in Carmichael over the soccer fields just south of the Koobs Nature Area between Engle and Gibbons and west of Garfield Ave. I have been scanning the skies all day because the other times I've found Black Swift was during this kind of unsettled weather. The very large, all-dark swift was riding the winds without much flapping. I only saw a few shallow wingbeats. It passed over the Koobs Nature Area and headed north. Good luck and good birding. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA

--

Clifford Hawley 
Sacramento, CA

"For, what are the voices of birds...
But words, our words, 
Only so much more sweet?"   
Robert Browning


Rose-breasted Grosbeak - Sutter County

Matt Forster
 

Early afternoon today, I received a call from my mom saying she thought she had a adult male, Rose-breasted Grosbeak at her feeder outside of Meridian in Sutter County. Living in Chico, a little more than an hour away, I jumped in my car and immediately called Stuart Angerer who lives right across the river from my parents. 

About twenty minutes out from the location, Stuart confirmed the sighting. I arrived and heard the song as soon as I stepped out of the car, then confirmed it 20 minutes later with a visual. Since 2:30pm, the bird has been continuously singing and visiting the feeder in the chicken pen every 20-30 minutes. My parents are happy to accommodate anyone that would like to try for the bird. You can park in the front of there house and walk around the north side to the back of the property where the feeders are. Email me directly for the address or check my eBird checklist: findforster@...

Matt Forster
Chico, CA


Glossy Ibis Woodland WTP

Mark Stephenson <markstephenson4106@...>
 

Hi all; today Lucas Stephenson found a Glossy Ibis at Woodland WTP with photos at the pond past where there’s a sign that states no Birder Vehicles past this point. We have posted an eBird checklist of the sighting. We studied this bird carefully with Lucas Corneliussen and Joseph Zeno. Very north east side of the water treatment plant in an ephemeral pond. 
Good Luck&Happy Birding
Mark&Lucas Stephenson




Fw: [CVBirds] northern parula at Grasslands Park

Michael Perrone
 



----- Forwarded Message -----

From: michaelperrone10@... [central_valley_birds] <central_valley_birds-noreply@...>
To: "central_valley_birds@..." <central_valley_birds@...>
Sent: Friday, May 17, 2019, 1:29:47 PM PDT
Subject: [CVBirds] northern parula at Grasslands Park

 

This morning Grasslands Park in Yolo County was very birdy, including a sporadically singing northern parula, first found near the southeast corner of the wooded area, and later (about 10 AM) just north of the headquarters/park host building.  Given that amount of travel, it could be anywhere in the park by now.


Michael Perrone & Sonjia Shelly

Davis

__._,_.___

Posted by: michaelperrone10@...
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (1)

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Sacramento Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

John Sterling
 

Following Gil Ewing’s suggestion, I checked out the night-heron rookery in south Sacramento tonight and saw 1 and maybe 2 Yellow-crowned Night-Herons fly to the west from the rookery trees at 8:15. One for sure with slighter build and leg extension beyond the tail. The second bird looked good but was not absolutely positive as I didn’t get a long enough look.


John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

PO Box 1653
Woodland, CA 95776A

530 908-3836
jsterling@...
www.sterlingbirds.com


Re: Strategy to see the continuing Yellow-crowned Night-Heron in Sacramento

Paddlegal
 

Fantastic!  Thanks for the info and your determination. I'll give  it another try. 

Farley
Sacramento CA


On May 11, 2019, at 11:12 PM, Gil Ewing <gewing1@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The Yellow-crowned Night-Heron is still present.
After totaling more than 6 hours of trying, this evening I finally got a brief view of the Yellow-crowned Night-Heron discovered and photographed by Carol Livingston on May 8 at the Waterford Cove Apartment rookery in Sacramento’s Pocket Area.
The bird was the 243rd night-heron flying out from the redwoods after sundown.

During evening daylight hours one would never have known there were more than than couple of dozen night-herons in the redwoods, as few were visible, were it not for the constant gurgling chatter emanating from high up there.
However, at 7:45PM, I noticed a few night-herons trickling out and flying west, into the west wind (into the direction of the Sacramento River and Babel Slough), at the rate of only about 2 per minute at first. So I stationed myself on the west side of the area at the corner of Cutting Way and Lanyard Court, to view and count the herons, all of which were flying westward over or by my location. It was getting too dark to try photography, but the Yellow-crowned Night-Heron was finally spotted at 8:23 PM, before it got too dark to see well enough. 
See attached eBirdchecklist for more info (but no photo of the rarity).

On an earlier visit, I found the herons were much more active and visible at dawn than they had been in the evening today. Maybe that could be a good time to detect this rarity in better light.

Good luck.

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA 

______________________________________

Waterford Cove Apartments heron rookery, Sacramento, California, US
May 11, 2019 5:18 PM - 8:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.4 kilometer(s)
Comments:     Sunny, 82 degrees at start, until well after sundown, dipping to 74 degrees, with a steady, building west wind. For the first two hours twenty minutes I saw fewer than two dozen night-herons in the trees, but at 7:45 PM they started to trickle out from the redwoods. All of them were flying westward, so I stationed myself at the corner of Cutting Way and Lanyard Court to study them as they flew out.  They were flying out at only the rate of about 2 a minute at first, but as the light was fading the rate increased.
29 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  2
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  9
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon))  2
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  6
Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna)  2
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  3
Great Egret (Ardea alba)  2     A pair circled repeatedly and landed on the redwoods periodically, and appeared to be investigating the. possibility of nesting here.
Snowy Egret (Egretta thula)  80     An estimate.  Early on, I could count only 21 in the redwoods, but more kept flying in, including flocks of 18, 14, 14, 7, and individuals.
Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)  2     Two separate individuals briefly landed on the redwoods.
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  4     One was seen flying out of a redwood, so it probably had a nest there.
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)  259     Two-hundred fifty-nine. This is an actual count of individuals that were flying westward out of the redwood rookery/nest colony after 7:45PM until 8:30PM. The total number was amazing considering that very few of these were visible earlier.
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea)  1     Continuing rarity discovered and photographed by Carol Livingstone on May 8.  This was the 243rd night-heron flying out from the redwoods after sundown, at 8:23PM. It was already too dark to appreciate some features such as the dark underwings, as the bird flew by overhead, but there was enough light to discern the dark head with a pale crown and a white streak on the lower cheek.
White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi)  28     In a single flock flying over.
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  2
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)  1
Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni)  3
Nuttall's Woodpecker (Dryobates nuttallii)  2
Black Phoebe (Sayornis nigricans)  2
California Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica)  2
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  9
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  6
Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota)  8
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)  4
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)  2
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  5
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  3
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  64     Flocks of 42 and 22 came to roost.
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)  4
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56160945

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)



Strategy to see the continuing Yellow-crowned Night-Heron in Sacramento

Gil Ewing
 

Hi all,

The Yellow-crowned Night-Heron is still present.
After totaling more than 6 hours of trying, this evening I finally got a brief view of the Yellow-crowned Night-Heron discovered and photographed by Carol Livingston on May 8 at the Waterford Cove Apartment rookery in Sacramento’s Pocket Area.
The bird was the 243rd night-heron flying out from the redwoods after sundown.

During evening daylight hours one would never have known there were more than than couple of dozen night-herons in the redwoods, as few were visible, were it not for the constant gurgling chatter emanating from high up there.
However, at 7:45PM, I noticed a few night-herons trickling out and flying west, into the west wind (into the direction of the Sacramento River and Babel Slough), at the rate of only about 2 per minute at first. So I stationed myself on the west side of the area at the corner of Cutting Way and Lanyard Court, to view and count the herons, all of which were flying westward over or by my location. It was getting too dark to try photography, but the Yellow-crowned Night-Heron was finally spotted at 8:23 PM, before it got too dark to see well enough. 
See attached eBirdchecklist for more info (but no photo of the rarity).

On an earlier visit, I found the herons were much more active and visible at dawn than they had been in the evening today. Maybe that could be a good time to detect this rarity in better light.

Good luck.

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA 

______________________________________

Waterford Cove Apartments heron rookery, Sacramento, California, US
May 11, 2019 5:18 PM - 8:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.4 kilometer(s)
Comments:     Sunny, 82 degrees at start, until well after sundown, dipping to 74 degrees, with a steady, building west wind. For the first two hours twenty minutes I saw fewer than two dozen night-herons in the trees, but at 7:45 PM they started to trickle out from the redwoods. All of them were flying westward, so I stationed myself at the corner of Cutting Way and Lanyard Court to study them as they flew out.  They were flying out at only the rate of about 2 a minute at first, but as the light was fading the rate increased.
29 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  2
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  9
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon))  2
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  6
Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna)  2
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  3
Great Egret (Ardea alba)  2     A pair circled repeatedly and landed on the redwoods periodically, and appeared to be investigating the. possibility of nesting here.
Snowy Egret (Egretta thula)  80     An estimate.  Early on, I could count only 21 in the redwoods, but more kept flying in, including flocks of 18, 14, 14, 7, and individuals.
Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)  2     Two separate individuals briefly landed on the redwoods.
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  4     One was seen flying out of a redwood, so it probably had a nest there.
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)  259     Two-hundred fifty-nine. This is an actual count of individuals that were flying westward out of the redwood rookery/nest colony after 7:45PM until 8:30PM. The total number was amazing considering that very few of these were visible earlier.
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea)  1     Continuing rarity discovered and photographed by Carol Livingstone on May 8.  This was the 243rd night-heron flying out from the redwoods after sundown, at 8:23PM. It was already too dark to appreciate some features such as the dark underwings, as the bird flew by overhead, but there was enough light to discern the dark head with a pale crown and a white streak on the lower cheek.
White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi)  28     In a single flock flying over.
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  2
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)  1
Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni)  3
Nuttall's Woodpecker (Dryobates nuttallii)  2
Black Phoebe (Sayornis nigricans)  2
California Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica)  2
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  9
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  6
Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota)  8
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)  4
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)  2
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  5
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  3
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  64     Flocks of 42 and 22 came to roost.
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)  4
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56160945

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)



Tall Forest survey results

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

Today's Tall Forest bird survey at the Cosumnes River Preserve produced about 81 species of birds.  There were no real surprises but a nice variety of regular passerine migrants, some of these in high numbers.  Highlights included the following:
bald eagle-  1 adult
western wood-pewee-  8
Pacific-slope flycatcher-  1
western flycatcher-  3
Cassin's vireo-  1
warbling vireo-  6
Swainson's thrush-  24
golden-crowned sparrow-  1
Oregon junco-  1
brown-headed cowbird-  50 (the lowlight)
Nashville warbler-  3
common yellowthroat-  17
yellow warbler-  5
black-throated gray warbler-  3
Townsend's warbler-  14
hermit warbler-  1
Wilson's warbler-  36
western tanager-  3
black-headed grosbeak-  40
blue grosbeak-  1
lazuli bunting-  2

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Summer Tanager

Ray Rozema
 

Hello

Has the Summer Tanager been seen in Davis, after the first sighting?

Thankyou
Ray Rozema
Sheldon CA


NO luck refinding the Yellow-crowned Night-heron

Gil Ewing
 

Hi all

I failed in trying to find the Yellow-crowned Night-heron photographed and reported by Carol Livingston last evening in Sacramento’s Pocket Area at the Waterford Cover Apartments heron rookery at Windbridge Dr. and Cutting Way.
Spent over three hours there. Two other birders came and went, and another arrived as I was leaving, but by then the night-herons were mostly tucked away in the redwoods and mostly hidden from view.
Perhaps evening might be a better time to search.

My eBird checklist, attached below, has some further details.

Gil Ewing
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., CA


Begin forwarded message:

Subject: eBird Report - Waterford Cove Apartments heron rookery, May 9, 2019
Date: May 9, 2019 at 11:07:13 AM PDT

Waterford Cove Apartments heron rookery, Sacramento, California, US
May 9, 2019 5:51 AM - 9:10 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 kilometer(s)
Comments:     Clear skies, breezy, 54 degrees, warming to 59 degrees and calmer.  No luck seeing yesterday's reported Yellow-crowned Night-Heron despite prolonged effort. The Black-crowned Night-Herons were very active for the first 20 minutes I was there and slowed down markedly by 9AM, with a few individuals still flying in with nesting material after then.  Conversely, the Snowy Egrets became more active. The night-herons were mostly buried in the redwoods and not visible by the time I left.
29 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  17
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  6     All were males, presumably with the females away on nests.
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon))  11
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  1
White-throated Swift (Aeronautes saxatalis)  2
Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna)  1
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  3
Great Egret (Ardea alba)  6     These came in early, landed on the redwoods, and later disappeared. They did not seem to be participating in the nest colony.
Snowy Egret (Egretta thula)  45     A minimum number. Most if not all had breeding plumes and pink lores.
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  3     All three were flying over the adjacent canal.
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)  120     One-hundred twenty is the estimate. Probably more than this, as they outnumbered the Snowy Egrets about 3 to 1 early on. Most were adults, some on nests, many more  carrying nesting material. Several were subadults showing no sign of nesting participation. Two were just-fledged juveniles warily inching out on a limb toward their parent.
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  3
Nuttall's Woodpecker (Dryobates nuttallii)  2
Black Phoebe (Sayornis nigricans)  2
California Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica)  2
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  7     Harassing herons and vultures and looking for food.
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)  2
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  6
Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota)  13
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)  3
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)  2
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  4
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  5
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)  3
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)  1
Brewer's Blackbird (Euphagus cyanocephalus)  1
Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana)  1
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56047196

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


Summer Tanager at West Pond, Davis, CA Wed. May 8, 2019

Gene R. Trapp
 


An adult male Summer Tanager was spotted at 10:00 a.m. at the SW corner of the small park at the west end of Isle Royale Lane, Davis, CA. It perched in a mulberry tree eating a yellow-jacket. Seen by Gene Trapp, Jo Ellen Ryan, Dave Ludwig, and three others. Photos by Jo Ellen.

Directions to West Pond in Davis: Drive west on Covell Blvd/Rd. 31 to Denali Drive and turn left. Turn right on Isle Royale Lane, park at the west end. Walk straight ahead toward the pond, the mulberry tree is on the left in the corner of the park.




Gene Trapp
Davis, CA


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