Date   

Sacramento County Orchard Oriole 8/22/18

Clifford Hawley
 

Hi birders, 

Mark Sawyer just texted me that he found a female-type Orchard Oriole at Marriott Park in the Pocket area of Sacramento (https://goo.gl/maps/agqU8QurqRp). He was watching the bird in the southwest part of the park in a group of large heritage oaks. Good birding. 

Cliff Hawley
Sacramento, CA


Ruff at Davis Wastewater

Steve Hampton
 

This evening there was a RUFF at Davis Wastewater, loosely associating with the 1100 dowitchers.  There was also a MARBLED GODWIT at the nearby landfill pond, viewed from the levee, in the far back west of the pond. 

good birding, 

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: [CVBirds] Chimney Swift over Putah Creek

michael helm
 

This is the right time for Vaux's swifts.  They are definitely being seen in
early migration in a few locations in Sonoma Co, and at one place in
Marin Co.

I would definitely be interested in any reports of other chaetura swifts
from this area.  There's a lot about the migration that isn't understood
at all.

Thanks, ==mwh
Michael Helm
Richmond CA

On Sun, Aug 19, 2018 at 11:10 PM, Steve Hampton stevechampton@gmail..com [central_valley_birds] <central_valley_birds-noreply@...> wrote:
 

This morning around 8am, as I was walking upstream in an open area between Hopkins and Pedrick, a swift came toward me a little above treetop level, heading downstream in a fairly straight line, alternating flapping and gliding, not making any significant zig-zags. Because it had long scythe-like wings, longer than a swallow, I assumed it was low-flying White-throated Swift, although that seemed odd because normally they are high up and in a little group and vocalizing. As it approached, I realized it was all dark, even darker than Vaux's (I had the morning sun behind me, so excellent light) and clearly larger than Vaux's. As it came over, my mind went to Black Swift, but directly overhead I examined the tail, which was short and squared off. I then realized it was a Chimney Swift as it passed overhead. By this time, it was too late to get my camera on it, as tall trees quickly blocked my view downstream. Due to it's long narrow wings, at no time did I even consider Vaux's, which always strike me as smaller than a swallow and very twittery in flight. 

Here are my notes that I put in eBird at the time:
"Solo bird flying just above treetop level downstream. In good light, rather darker than Vaux's and with longer scythe-like wings-- longer wingspan than swallows. At first I assumed it was White-thr Swift based on size and shape, until I saw it was dark. Flight was more direct than I am used to it with Vaux's. Black Swift ruled out by narrow squared off tail."

I looked on-line to see if any Chimney (or, for that matter, Vaux's) were moving now, as the timing is early. Of interest was a report of a Chimney Swift July 4 in Palmdale by Kimball Garrett (see https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47036771). His reaction was very similar to mine: 
"Observed for about a minute (0742-0743) as it foraged fairly high with Cliff Swallows, just west of the intersection of 47th St E and Mt. Emma Rd.. An all-blackish swift that flew with rapid wingbeats about half the time, and short glides the other half of the time. Size hard to judge -- roughly the same size as the nearby Cliff Swallows, or perhaps very slightly larger (at least longer-winged). It is ironic that Chimney Swifts can be difficult to pick out among Vaux's Swifts, but that the instant I saw this bird it was clear that it was either a Black Swift or a Chimney Swift, with the bird bearing little resemblance to a Vaux's. [The fact it was July might have entered into my subconscious reasoning, but the bird really didn't look like a Vaux's at all.] And yet Vaux's and Black Swifts are utterly different in appearance and would never be confused. In any case, I was confident this was a Chimney Swift and not a Black Swift because of the more rapid wingbeats, shorter glides, more scythe-like wings (lacking the distinct angle at the wrist present in Cypseloides swifts), and stubby tail (slightly squared, but rather short and never fanned or showing any kind of notch or fork). A Black Swift would also have looked substantially larger than the Cliff Swallows."

For my full eBird list and some warbler pics, see


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA



Re: [CVBirds] Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Yolo County, 20 August 2018

Ron Melcer
 

Hi all,

Wonderful find!

Please be sure to submit your field notes and any other documentation (recordings?) to CDFW for a California Natural Diversity Database (CNDDB) record.  This is super important. 

There is a significant amount of planned construction activity and potential for vegetation removal/impacts in the northern portion of the bypass. This has historically (2005/2006) been Cuckoo habitat... and appears to continue to support the species. 

The cottonwood willow stands at Fremont, Sacramento Weir, and Cache Creek Settling Basin are of the most significant riparian remnants in the lower Sacramento valley. 

Continued documentation of these sensitive species is of utmost importance in the context of near term construction work - and can enable further restoration of these limited resources. 

Good birding!

Ron Melcer
Sacramento, CA


On Aug 20, 2018, at 19:45, Holly cranberryjacket@... [central_valley_birds] <central_valley_birds-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Today, at about 9:30am, we had a Yellow-billed Cuckoo vocalizing at the western entrance gate to Fremont Weir State Wildlife Area (Rd 116A, near 38.7590,-121.6714). The bird started calling from high in a cluster of cottonwoods above our heads, then continued vocalizing as it flew somewhere to the west, upstream along the river. Despite concerted efforts to relocate the bird (with the help of Joan Humphrey, Jason Riggio, and Michael Perrone), we could not again detect the bird during the next 3 hours of searching. Ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47972007. 

Holly Coates & Emmett Iverson
Davis, CA


Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Yolo County, 20 August 2018

Holly Coates
 

Today, at about 9:30am, we had a Yellow-billed Cuckoo vocalizing at the western entrance gate to Fremont Weir State Wildlife Area (Rd 116A, near 38.7590,-121.6714). The bird started calling from high in a cluster of cottonwoods above our heads, then continued vocalizing as it flew somewhere to the west, upstream along the river. Despite concerted efforts to relocate the bird (with the help of Joan Humphrey, Jason Riggio, and Michael Perrone), we could not again detect the bird during the next 3 hours of searching. Ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47972007. 

Holly Coates & Emmett Iverson
Davis, CA


Central Valley Birding Symposium Nov. 15-18, 2018

L Pittman
 

 

The Central Valley Bird Club will be hosting the 22nd annual Central Valley Birding Symposium Nov. 15-18, 2018, at the Stockton Hilton Hotel in Stockton, CA.  The Great Central Valley, in the heart of California and the Pacific Flyway, is uniquely situated for excellent birding.  Please join us as the CVBS again celebrates the best of birding in the Central Valley! 

 
The CVBS kicks off with a scrumptious hors d’oeuvres buffet & no host bar on Thursday night, followed by one of our favorite keynotes, outstanding photographer, birder, and presenter, Ed Harper, with his program on "Northern Delights”. 


Friday night's keynote program “Bird Migration:  The More We Learn, The Less We Know” will be presented by Ed Pandolfino.  


Saturday night's keynote program, “The Trade Off” will be presented by John Kricher.  In this lively and thought-provoking presentation, he will contrast the lives, ecology, and natural history of long-distance migrant passerine birds with bird species that are permanent residents of lowland tropical forests.

Informative and entertaining workshops include: “History of Field Idenfication” with Joe Morlan, “eBird, Bird Identification, and Alternative Facts: eGads!" by Kimball Garrett, a specimen workshop, and an update on Central Valley bird conservation and research programs.   Build your skills at these workshops:  Digiscoping, Image Editing, Bird Sketching, Beginning Birding and Carving.  

Field trips, offered Friday, Saturday and Sunday, always turn up exciting birds. Add in the entertaining and educational Bird ID Panel, the wonderful selection of optics, art and gifts at the Birder’s Market plus the camaraderie of hundreds of like-minded folks, and you know you’ll have a good time! There's something for everyone interested in birds. Come and join us to bird, learn, and just have fun! 

To look over the schedule of events, go to:
http://www.cvbirds.org/events/symposium/

Registration begins August 24, 2018.

 

CVBS Steering Committee

www.cvbirds.org

Linda Pittman

Wilton, CA

 


Chimney Swift over Putah Creek

Steve Hampton
 

This morning around 8am, as I was walking upstream in an open area between Hopkins and Pedrick, a swift came toward me a little above treetop level, heading downstream in a fairly straight line, alternating flapping and gliding, not making any significant zig-zags. Because it had long scythe-like wings, longer than a swallow, I assumed it was low-flying White-throated Swift, although that seemed odd because normally they are high up and in a little group and vocalizing. As it approached, I realized it was all dark, even darker than Vaux's (I had the morning sun behind me, so excellent light) and clearly larger than Vaux's. As it came over, my mind went to Black Swift, but directly overhead I examined the tail, which was short and squared off. I then realized it was a Chimney Swift as it passed overhead. By this time, it was too late to get my camera on it, as tall trees quickly blocked my view downstream. Due to it's long narrow wings, at no time did I even consider Vaux's, which always strike me as smaller than a swallow and very twittery in flight. 

Here are my notes that I put in eBird at the time:
"Solo bird flying just above treetop level downstream. In good light, rather darker than Vaux's and with longer scythe-like wings-- longer wingspan than swallows. At first I assumed it was White-thr Swift based on size and shape, until I saw it was dark. Flight was more direct than I am used to it with Vaux's. Black Swift ruled out by narrow squared off tail."

I looked on-line to see if any Chimney (or, for that matter, Vaux's) were moving now, as the timing is early. Of interest was a report of a Chimney Swift July 4 in Palmdale by Kimball Garrett (see https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47036771). His reaction was very similar to mine: 
"Observed for about a minute (0742-0743) as it foraged fairly high with Cliff Swallows, just west of the intersection of 47th St E and Mt. Emma Rd. An all-blackish swift that flew with rapid wingbeats about half the time, and short glides the other half of the time. Size hard to judge -- roughly the same size as the nearby Cliff Swallows, or perhaps very slightly larger (at least longer-winged). It is ironic that Chimney Swifts can be difficult to pick out among Vaux's Swifts, but that the instant I saw this bird it was clear that it was either a Black Swift or a Chimney Swift, with the bird bearing little resemblance to a Vaux's. [The fact it was July might have entered into my subconscious reasoning, but the bird really didn't look like a Vaux's at all.] And yet Vaux's and Black Swifts are utterly different in appearance and would never be confused. In any case, I was confident this was a Chimney Swift and not a Black Swift because of the more rapid wingbeats, shorter glides, more scythe-like wings (lacking the distinct angle at the wrist present in Cypseloides swifts), and stubby tail (slightly squared, but rather short and never fanned or showing any kind of notch or fork). A Black Swift would also have looked substantially larger than the Cliff Swallows."

For my full eBird list and some warbler pics, see


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Solitary Sandpiper at West Pond in Davis

Gene Trapp <grtrapp@...>
 


We saw a Solitary Sandpiper at 10:00 a.m. on Aug. 17 at West Pond, Davis, off the west end of Shenandoah Place. The pond just got water Aug. 15 from the dedicated pump after being dry for the first half of August. This is a new species for our West Pond checklist which was started by Ed Whisler nearly 30 yrs ago. The pond is almost dry now. 
Directions to West Pond in Davis: Drive west on Covell Blvd/Rd. 31 to Denali Drive and turn left. Turn right on Shenandoah Place, park at the west end. Walk straight ahead. 


Re: [CVBirds] Bell’s Sparrow at Reichmuth Park

Dan Airola
 

Sorry. Forgot signature. Also Reichmuth Park is in south Sacramento. 

Dan Airola
Sacramento


On Aug 19, 2018, at 9:41 AM, Dan Airola d.airola@... [central_valley_birds] <central_valley_birds-noreply@...> wrote:

 

A Bell’s Sparrow is at Reichmuth Park this morning. The bird is at the south side of the wooded (south) area of the park, feeding on the dirt trail on the east side of the overgrown drainage ditch, just northeast of the clearing there. Most easily reached from Silver Lake Dr. park near pump station and take trail on east side.

I am not an expert on species, but shows stronger markings and whitish belly of Bell’s rather than Sage. Also blackish chest marks.

No Summer Tanager seen here yet. Still looking.



Bell’s Sparrow at Reichmuth Park

Dan Airola
 

A Bell’s Sparrow is at Reichmuth Park this morning. The bird is at the south side of the wooded (south) area of the park, feeding on the dirt trail on the east side of the overgrown drainage ditch, just northeast of the clearing there. Most easily reached from Silver Lake Dr. park near pump station and take trail on east side.

I am not an expert on species, but shows stronger markings and whitish belly of Bell’s rather than Sage. Also blackish chest marks.

No Summer Tanager seen here yet. Still looking.


Summer Tanager at Putah Creek (Solano)

Kirk Swenson
 

I just had a molting male Summer Tanager on the Solano side of the creek near the base of Hopkins (38°31′30″ N  121°47′25″ W) ~11:00. Last seen flying downstream (east).

Good birding,
Kirk Swenson


Solitary Sandpiper spotted at West Pond this morning

Gene Trapp <grtrapp@...>
 


We saw a Solitary Sandpiper at 10:00 a.m. this morning in the largest pond at West Pond, Davis, off the west end of Shenandoah Place. The pond just got water on Wednesday a.m. from the dedicated pump after being dry for the first half of August. Jo Ellen got several photos and video.

This is a new species for our West Pond checklist which was started by Ed Whisler nearly 30 yrs ago. 

GeneTrapp & Joe Ellen Ryan

Solitary Sandpiper at West Pond in Davis


Solitary Sandpiper at West Pond, Davis


Location of Solitary Sandpiper at West Pond, Davis. It is in the
photo, but difficult to see.


Directions to West Pond in Davis: Drive west on Covell Blvd/Rd. 31 to Denali Drive and turn left. Turn right on Shenandoah Place, park at the west end. Walk straight ahead. 


-


Re: [CVBirds] Summer Tanager, Reichmuth Park SAC

Dan Airola
 

I hope I am not confusing anything but a few clarifications re: directions to the Summer Tanager at Reichmuth Park.  The park contains both the wooded detention area at the south end and extensive turf play fields to the north.  So you don't want to park at the north end of the playfields area, but rather at the north or south end of the wooded portion of the park.  Also, by "river" I think they mean the small straightened drainage ditch that flows to the pump station at Silver Lake Dr.  Access to this area is actually closer from Silver Lake Dr., where you can walk from the trial east of the pump station to the clearing.
 
Dan Airola 
Sacramento


On Friday, August 17, 2018 11:13 AM, "Frances Oliver hummer52@... [central_valley_birds]" wrote:


 
Posting for Jon Dunn & Ed Pandolfino:

Today while Birding Reichmuth Park in Sacramento, Jon & Ed observed a Summer Tanager. Note: For those of you who chased the Worm-eating Warbler in the past, it was south of this area.

If you park at the N end of Reichmuth, walk S along the path through the clearing until you reach Frisbee hole #2. Then go back 50-100 yd NE and closer to the river. The SUTA was seen in the area of elderberries & dead trees. Many other migrants including BHGR, WETA & robins are in the area.

I apologise for the brief directions, but I'm writing it on my phone.

Frances (serving as a messanger)



Summer Tanager, Reichmuth Park SAC

Frances Oliver
 

Posting for Jon Dunn & Ed Pandolfino:

Today while Birding Reichmuth Park in Sacramento, Jon & Ed observed a Summer Tanager. Note: For those of you who chased the Worm-eating Warbler in the past, it was south of this area.

If you park at the N end of Reichmuth, walk S along the path through the clearing until you reach Frisbee hole #2. Then go back 50-100 yd NE and closer to the river. The SUTA was seen in the area of elderberries & dead trees. Many other migrants including BHGR, WETA & robins are in the area.

I apologise for the brief directions, but I'm writing it on my phone.

Frances (serving as a messanger)


Yolo shorebirds

Steve Hampton
 

Yesterday there were 2 Pectoral Sandpipers in the first check, south side, of the Aug shorebird ponds at Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area. Kirk Swensen reported 2 Baird's in further checks the other day. 

There are lots of peeps. 

I accessed the south side from a little game trail opposite the south levee.  This side is close to birds, but there are thorns and biting flies. 

Has anyone been to Davis Wetlands or Woodland North Regional Pond (ibis colony pond) lately?  I'm wondering about shorebirds there. 

thx



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA


Re: NO Chestnut-sided Warbler Yolo Solano

Sally M. Walters
 

Yesterday, Aug 15, 2018

On Aug 16, 2018, at 5:07 PM, Sally Walters <bajaowl@gmail.com> wrote:

Missed the chestnut-sided warbler but there was plenty of other goodies, and I had the place all to myself!
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/email?subID=S47891361


NO Chestnut-sided Warbler Yolo Solano

Sally M. Walters
 

Missed the chestnut-sided warbler but there was plenty of other goodies, and I had the place all to myself!
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/email?subID=S47891361


Tall Forest survey this Saturday

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

I resend the note below since it seems not to have gotten through yesterday.  I apologize if this is a duplication in your inbox.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj@...>
Date: Wed, Aug 15, 2018 at 11:49 AM
Subject: Tall Forest survey this Saturday
To: CV Birds <central_valley_birds@...>


Dear Birders,

This month's iteration of the Tall Forest bird survey will take place this Saturday, 18 August 2018.  We will go through the locked Farm Center gate, corner of Bruceville and Desmond Roads promptly at 05:45.  The trails will be dry, though there may be substantial dew at our first stop or two, so you have your choice of footwear.  Mosquitoes are around but not so numerous as on many other occasions.  It is still a good idea to have insect repellent at hand.  Yellowjackets are a minor nuisance at the moment; they routinely get peskier later in the summer.

In recent months I asked folks to sign up on the preserve's website.  Advance registration seems no longer required, as I checked just now and the "button" to do so is no longer present.

Woodland birding in the last week has been quite underwhelming.  Shorebirding has been decent (on Sunday I found marbled godwit, willet and Wilson's phalarope, and yesterday Baird's sandpiper and Wilson's phalarope), but the habitat is rapidly disappearing.  What remains is about equally divided between three fields on the south side of Desmond Road just west of the Farm Center gate and inaccessible fields behind the gate, which we'll visit on Saturday.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento



--
John Trochet
Sacramento, California
trochetj@...


Tall Forest survey this Saturday

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

This month's iteration of the Tall Forest bird survey will take place this Saturday, 18 August 2018.  We will go through the locked Farm Center gate, corner of Bruceville and Desmond Roads promptly at 05:45.  The trails will be dry, though there may be substantial dew at our first stop or two, so you have your choice of footwear.  Mosquitoes are around but not so numerous as on many other occasions.  It is still a good idea to have insect repellent at hand.  Yellowjackets are a minor nuisance at the moment; they routinely get peskier later in the summer.

In recent months I asked folks to sign up on the preserve's website.  Advance registration seems no longer required, as I checked just now and the "button" to do so is no longer present.

Woodland birding in the last week has been quite underwhelming.  Shorebirding has been decent (on Sunday I found marbled godwit, willet and Wilson's phalarope, and yesterday Baird's sandpiper and Wilson's phalarope), but the habitat is rapidly disappearing.  What remains is about equally divided between three fields on the south side of Desmond Road just west of the Farm Center gate and inaccessible fields behind the gate, which we'll visit on Saturday.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Re: [CVBirds] Re: Begging cowbird and hooded oriole

Dawn Garcia
 

Hi Alvaro,
maybe but unlikely in my brief observation. I have photos(with my phone so
not great) but was first cued in by the begging call of the young cowbird.
Only killdeer in the area and within inches of the cowbird, on this harsh
landscape and in the near area, foraging around the moist mineral flats. I
thought it was odd too, watched for about 5 minutes and made notes to self.
Might have missed something...
Dawn
Dawn Garcia
Oroville, CA

On Tue, Aug 14, 2018 at 6:06 PM, Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao@coastside.net>
wrote:

Hi Dawn

Hooded Orioles take nectar, but they rear their chicks on insect
prey. In fact they take a lot more insects than they do nectar, but
nectaring is much more obvious to us as birders than their insectivore
diet. The Killdeer observation is odd, Killdeer young are precocial and
adults do not feed the young. So perhaps something else was going on here?

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com



*From:* central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com <central_valley_birds@
yahoogroups.com> *On Behalf Of *Dawn Garcia avifan59@gmail.com
[central_valley_birds]
*Sent:* Tuesday, August 14, 2018 4:55 PM
*To:* central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com
*Subject:* [CVBirds] Re: Begging cowbird and hooded oriole





I think Barbara's post is pretty amazing. I wouldn't have thought of an
often-nectar feeder like an oriole as being a cowbird host. My cowbird
rearing sightings follow. Most recently in Yellowstone I saw two killdeer,
presumably a pair feeding a begging cowbird (BHCO), they were on a thermal
feature. In the Devils Canyon (SD) I had a male western tanager feeding a
begging BHCO. In years past I have seen a chipping sparrow (Lake Davis) and
Wilson's warbler (Bainbridge Island, WA) as cowbird "parents". It is always
surprising and rarely forgettable!



--

Dawn

Dawn Garcia

Oroville, CA




--
Dawn


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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