Date   

Re: Migration

John Ehrenfeld
 

Numerous Blue Grosbeak seen this week scattered in seeded brush and power lines adjacent to farmland.

About a mile due north of the Yolo Bypass.

Found them driving roads slowly listening for their distinctive call. 

John Ehrenfeld
Napa




Migration

John Ehrenfeld
 

Lake Solano day use area very birdy with migrants August 3rd, Many Pacific-slope Flycatchers, also Wilson’s Warblers, Black-throated Grays.

John Ehrenfeld
Napa

  


many Curlews and Swainson's Hawks on CR 104

Susan Harrison
 

 

There is a large (150+) flock of Long-Billed Curlews in the recently mown hayfields along County Road 104 just south of CR 27 (aka dirt road just NW of Yolo Co. Landfill).  Several days ago our friends saw 80+ Swainson’s Hawks there, mixed in with the curlews, although this afternoon I only saw 6-8 hawks.     Worth keeping an eye on….      


Say's Phoebe nesting in North Davis (Yolo County)

Chris Dunford
 

On July 13, Josh Greenfield photographed an adult Say's Phoebe feeding three full-grown juveniles at the Northstar Park soccer fields in North Davis (corner of Anderson and F Street) - see https://ebird.org/checklist/S115268697 for photos and location. In personal communications, Josh had informed me over the past several months of continuous Say's Phoebe presence in the same area, including an apparent nesting attempt in early April that failed due probably to nest predation. Though Say's Phoebes are seen regularly in the nesting season in parts of Davis in recent years, this report provides the first solid evidence of successful nesting in Davis since the 2018 report by Michael Perrone of an adult carrying food repeatedly into a barn next to the Wildhorse golf course on the edge of northeast Davis (but no juveniles were seen subsequently).

Josh's report prompted me to check in with my co-authors of the 2019 article in Central Valley Birds "Expansion of Say's Phoebe Breeding in California's Central Valley" (Vo. 22, No. 3) for an update on Say's Phoebe nesting in Woodland (Tim Mangum), Rio Vista (Viola Saima-Barklow), and Fresno (Jeff Davis).  They provide good documentation of Say's Phoebe nesting every year for at least 5-6 years in at least these three widely separated locations in the Central Valley. All three locations have produced juveniles each year, with the exception of Rio Vista this year 2022, due to nest predation. Given the number of offspring produced over the years in Rio Vista, the nesting failure this year may not break the generational chain of succession. It will be interesting to see what the Barklows report next year. Josh's report adds Davis to the list of Central Valley nesting locations this year. 

It seems that Say's Phoebes in the Central Valley are nesting exclusively in recent housing developments in the suburban-rural interface. The phoebes are nesting on external ledges protected by overhanging roofs, similar to Black Phoebes and Barn Swallows.

Chris Dunford
Davis


28 July 2022 = Cameras for Birders ...

Lois Richter & friends
 

... "What Camera Do YOU Use to Shoot Birds?"

Please consider being on the "Birding With Lois" (BWL) series which is recorded bi-weekly and archived on Youtube.

On 28 July, we will be doing a program about CAMERAS people use to shoot birds. It will be a gear discussion rather than a birding discussion. Meaning I'm hoping for as many photographers as I can get to be on the panel -- each to show what camera they use to take a picture (or video) of a bird and each to show some bird photos/videos taken with that camera.  
I'm hoping to have people from several regions. 

Might you be available that Thursday** to join us? 

Commitment 
BWL program = 4:30-6:00 PDT on Thursday, 28 July 2022, live zoom webinar, be a panelist (one of many!), show your camera, and some photos.
Required prep and practice = 4:30 PDT on Thursday, 21 July 2022, a zoom meeting for panelists who will be on-air the following week.  This is to get everyone registered; check the sound/video of each panelist; and make sure that your various photos/videos can be shown by our Media Manager.

** If you cannot come on the 28th, we might be able to interview you beforehand and play that recording during the show. 

-- Lois Richter for the BWL team
-- 530-902-0209 (phone best 11am - 7pm PT, text anytime)
-- BirdingWithLois@...

-- Lois Richter, Davis, Yolo County, California

--
Lois Richter, "Birding With Lois", Davis, California USA


Ft Bragg pelagic Saturday, Oct 1

Chuck & Barbara Vaughn
 

Apologies. Not a very good typsit: email address cevaughn@...

Greetings Central Valleybirders- We have reserved the Kraken for an
offshore pelagic birding trip out of Noyo Harbor (Fort Bragg) on Saturday,
October 1, 2022. This will be an all-day trip from 7am-5pm. Cost will be
in the range of $175 - $185 per person, depending on the number of
passengers and whether the price of diesel fuel goes up again. Leaders
will be Rob Fowler and Todd Easterla. To reserve a spot, please contact
Chuck Vaughn directly OFF LIST: cevaugh@...

The Kraken is the largest charter vessel currently operating out of Noyo
Harbor and an excellent birding platform. Past trips out of Noyo have
been very productive and late September/early October is typically the
peak of seabird diversity here. With favorable conditions we intend to go
30+ miles offshore.

Chuck Vaughn and Tim Bray




--
Chuck and Barbara Vaughn
Ukiah, CA











--
Chuck and Barbara Vaughn
Ukiah, CA


Ft Bragg pelagic Saturday, Oct 1

Chuck & Barbara Vaughn
 

Greetings Central Valleybirders- We have reserved the Kraken for an
offshore pelagic birding trip out of Noyo Harbor (Fort Bragg) on Saturday,
October 1, 2022. This will be an all-day trip from 7am-5pm. Cost will be
in the range of $175 - $185 per person, depending on the number of
passengers and whether the price of diesel fuel goes up again. Leaders
will be Rob Fowler and Todd Easterla. To reserve a spot, please contact
Chuck Vaughn directly OFF LIST: cevaugh@...

The Kraken is the largest charter vessel currently operating out of Noyo
Harbor and an excellent birding platform. Past trips out of Noyo have
been very productive and late September/early October is typically the
peak of seabird diversity here. With favorable conditions we intend to go
30+ miles offshore.

Chuck Vaughn and Tim Bray




--
Chuck and Barbara Vaughn
Ukiah, CA


blue grosbeak CRP now

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

It’s been a poor year for blue grosbeak on the lower Cosumnes River Preserve. But there is now a male calling and occasionally singing from cocklebur just west of the concrete path about fifty meters beyond the gate south of the boardwalk parking area.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Emails from Dale Swanberg

Ralph
 

Dale’s email has been hacked. If you received an email from him last night or this morning do not open it. He opened an email that he thought was from his provider and it wiped out his address book, so I am sending this for him. He has a new email address and I will be helping him rebuild his address book, but in the meantime, if you are friends with Dale and did not receive a direct email from me about this contact me off list and I will pass along your email address to him.
--
Happy birding, and, as always, may the light be with you,
Ralph Baker, Riverbank, CA


Birdwatching Club at UC Davis First Year

Cameron Tescher
 

Greetings,

I wanted to give a brief summary about our first year of the Birdwatching Club at UCD and some club highlights and starting the club from nothing. Not only is this a huge part in getting college birders involved in the Sacramento Valley as a whole but also can help give inspiration to birders if they want to find some way to get birding involved with the community.

As a UC Davis student, I am amazed by the incredible wildlife programs at UC Davis where they do a great job allowing students to have hands-on experience with work and research on wildlife in many different ways. I am also amazed with the hundreds and hundreds of student organizations that people can be a part of at UC Davis. Finally, we have a decent number of students whether they are new or very into it that enjoy birding. However, many faculty, community members, and students including I were surprised despite all of this, there is no club meant solely for birders and birding alone. Therefore, Frank Fabbro, Wentao Yang, Charlie Woidat, and I decided to meet up and start this club from nothing.

It took a while over the summer to get all the logistics done with the club whether what we want this club to be, what we want to do with the club, and our plans to start the club off strong. With help of Andy Engilis and the Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology at UC Davis, we also were able to help bring binoculars to those who need it. We sent flyers, posted on social media, talked with professors to get our flyers posted and clubs announced, and presented our club at a local club fair. From that, we got many birders who participated in our club where one time, we had 37 people show up to one field trip! Seeing this many people show up to one event after starting this club from nothing was nothing more than amazing! Also, we have over 200 people subscribed to our email list, over 300 people following our club instagram, and almost 200 people on our club discord so the amount of people who are interested in seeing what our club posts and wanting to be involved remains huge on campus. Finally, seeing students of different backgrounds with birds whether listers, photographers, wildlife and non-wildlife majors, and those who just want to appreciate a new hobby remains a huge part of the diversity of birding and birders on campus.

I think it is worth starting off with mentioning some key highlights each quarter that remain memorable for the club and birders on campus.

During fall quarter, we started our club off with a Meet and Greet. There, around 20 students showed up at the arboretum to meet other fellow students and observing some later fall migrants such as Western Tanager and Say's Phoebe. Learning from each of the students was a real joy and seeing everyone wanting to get involved was just heartwarming. Then, we had our first weekend trip at Putah Creek where 36 birders showed up and appreciated birding around the entire creek. Some notable highlights on this trip in early October included White-throated Sparrow, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, flyover Lewis's Woodpeckers, and Red-breasted Sapsuckers. We then went to Putah Canyon where we checked out spots such as Lake Solano and the fishing accesses where some highlights on that trip was a late Black-throated Gray and Townsend's Warbler, Lewis's Woodpecker, Phainopepla, Golden-crowned Kinglets, and possibly a club favorite, a curious Northern Pygmy-Owl that was eyeing us from less than 20 feet away (it can't get cooler than that). Our final weekend trip was to the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area where we enjoyed looking at the various shorebirds and waterfowl that call the Sacramento Valley its home for winter with a surprise Rough-legged Hawk that we had short views flying above. We also had trips during the weekdays where we birded the local Davis area which allowed for many students to observe birds while taking a relaxing break from class and perhaps write a short observation on it for their Bird class that many students take in fall. Finally, we offered two presentations, one done by Andy Engilis on the Sacramento Bird Inventory and another done by Bart Wickel and Emmett Iverson on the Putah Creek Christmas Bird Count where several club members were introduced to CBCs and either participated in this one or others in the general area.

During winter quarter, it started slow due to the first four weeks being online due to the Omicron variant. Despite that, we still managed to make our club work. We started off with a virtual presentation from Emilie Graves, a PhD student with Marcel Holyoak who discussed her research on Tricolored Blackbirds, once abundant throughout the Central Valley yet now endangered with few breeding colonies left. After that, we had a weekend trip to Sacramento NWR with the Wildlife Society chapter at UC Davis where we drove the autoloop and having exciting birds such as Eurasian Wigeon, Canvasback, Lesser Scaups, and Wilson's Snipe. We then went to the Bay Area (specifically MLK Regional Shoreline and Tilden Regional Park) where we got some more exciting coastal birds such as Allen's Hummingbird, Ridgway's Rail, Brant, and Surf Scoters. Finally, our last weekend trip was to Peña Adobe Park/ Lagoon Valley Park in Solano county where I find this to be a really interesting birding area for random uncommon birds that show up near the lake where some highlights include multiple Cackling Geese, 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, a Rock Wren, a pair of Blue-winged Teals, and our first Cliff Swallows for the year as a club (time around February). Also, Ohio State put together a big day competition where other birder clubs across the nation competed against each other and bird their own county and with the incredible amount of winter birds versus many northeastern counties with such few winter birds, Yolo county easily wiped out other counties with 140 species, notable highlights being Pacific Wren, Glaucous Gull, Yellow-headed Blackbird, American Bittern, and Townsend's Warbler with many club members joining and making this day possible! Some of our weekday trips included the arboretum as usual as well as Northstar Park where many of us had incredible views of Pine Siskin, a copulating pair of White-tailed Kites, and Common Gallinules.

Spring quarter remains the most hectic time of year for birders and other wildlife students. With activity picking up for migration, breeding season beginning, field work for students and faculty at its peak, and school work piling as seniors prepare for graduation, it remained a busy time for many of us. Nevertheless, our club trips were still a great part of the quarter. We started our club with an ID workshop about flycatchers in North America presented by Andy Engilis. He went over the hard (kingbirds), the brutal (pewees), and the insane (empidonaxes) so for many birders getting into it, they began to understand the hardest birds to identify. He also showed specimens of birds at the museum for identification purposes as well as the more striking species such as Vermilion Flycatcher and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. After that, we had our first weekend trip where we birded the local wetlands around Yolo and Solano county such as the Yolo Bypass, Woodland Wastewater Treatment Plant, and the county roads south of Davis and Dixon in Solano county. Our highlights was over 170 Red-necked Phalaropes as well as a continuing group of Pacific Golden-Plovers found by Ethan Monk the day before. We then had Migration Bingo where we birded around Putah Creek, a popular area for birders in the Central Valley during spring when all the migrants shown up where some good migrants people had included Hammond's Flycatcher, Vaux's Swift, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and Hermit Warbler and also played bingo in which person can get a five bird species in a row on their bingo boards (winner was Emmett Iverson, Zane Pickus, Wentao Yang, and Violet Wu). After that was the eBird Big Day trip where we had two groups, one led by Konshau Duman and Lynette Williams, another led by me to bird separate areas of the valley to get as many species as we can in a few hotspots. Some notable highlights include oversummering Greater White-fronted and Snow Geese, Black Terns, Whimbrels, Grasshopper Sparrows, and a male Purple Martin. We also had a couple weekday trips at the arboretum where we began to see the spring hatchlings such as a local arboretum family of Great-horned Owls and the Pied-billed Grebe, Wood Duck, and Mallard chicks along the creek. We also had a Friday evening trip to Cache Creek so eat dinner while we have the Lesser Nighthawks fly and display above us which probably was the most relaxing birding experience many of us had! Finally, we ended our year just last week camping in the Sierras and birding Sierra Valley and the mountains around it where we had amazing birds, some of the highlights included displaying Willets, Black-throated Sparrow in Plumas county, Evening Grosbeaks with amazing looks, and so much more.

For those curious to learn more about the species we saw, we have a Google Drive created to show those the photos we got from each of our field trips: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1KjEvSX3VQcyIwWaMPxJHDFS-a50hTxlCvWKgtIpjXt4/edit?usp=sharing

I want to give a great thank you to so many people. First, I would like to thank Frank Fabbro, Wentao Yang, Charlie Woidat, Meirun Zhang, and Robanjeet Singh for remaining a part of starting the club and/or keeping this club going. Second, I would like to thank Andy and Irene Engilis and the Museum of WFB for offering a room for presentations, allowing students to view specimens, and loaning binoculars and scopes for the students during the field trips. Third, I would like to thank the following people who offered to present for the club: Emmett Iverson, Bart Wickel, Andy Engilis, and Emilie Graves as well as the following people for helping lead field trips: Danielle Fradet, Konshau Duman, Lynette Williams, and Emmett Iverson. Finally I would like to thank the students at UC Davis for helping make this club happen. This is a great organization that is new yet I hope it would last a long time!

Good birding!

Cameron Tescher
Davis, CA


Ash-throated Flycatcher nestling photo opportunity

Dan Kopp
 

I sent this out ~ 10 A.M> but to the old Yahoo address; so now it's hot and not likely anyone will care, but....
 
I discovered a natural cavity Ash-throated Flycatcher nest three days ago and today was the first time I saw a nestling at the entrance. I managed many point and shoot quality photos but nothing magnificent.

In case that's of any interest to photographers let me know; it is ~ a minute walk from my back yard along the Parkway near Howe Ave.

916-213-2791

Dan Kopp
Sacramento


mid-June birds at the Cosumnes River Preserve

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

Birding has been seasonably slow of late.  The dawn chorus is pretty much done by sunrise.  The monthly Tall Forest bird survey last Saturday turned up 60 species, nothing grand.  There have recently been a few things of minor note:

greater yellowlegs-  one on 15 June was the first one back that I noticed.  There were two yesterday.
Wilson's phalarope-  three adults (one female, two males) yesterday
willow flycatcher-  the bird(s) found by Jane Griffith at a private inholding on 13 June was (were) not detected yesterday.
Pacific-slope flycatcher-  one singing yesterday in the ash/oak woods of the western Bottoms is the first in at least a month for me
tricolored blackbird-  no longer found in flocks behind the Farm Center gate but small numbers of individuals (fewer than 10) with big red-winged blackbird flocks, if you can find those.  They are ranging widely just now.
yellow warbler-  three stub-tailed juveniles in a Goodding's willow tree near the Accidental Forest yesterday
blue grosbeak-  present in very small numbers this year: one at McCormack-Williamson Tract on 16 June, two at Denier on 20 June, and one at the private inholding behind the Farm Center gate yesterday

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento



Chat heard

Sally M. Walters
 

CHECKLIST S113327699

Around 5PM the Chat was heard singing/calling for about 5-10 minutes or the until we left. The Chat was in the densely wooded area of Avery's Pond at the bridge and circular stone horse trough.  Merlin Song ID app confirm the bird as well.

El Dorado County, Folsom Lake SRA. From the Rattlesnake Bar Boat Launch, take the trail to the east of the boat ramp marked Avery’s Pond trail.

Sally M Walters 
Sacramento CA


Re: Merlin song ID QUESTION

linda gal
 

Hi Sally, you’re in luck. Merlin keeps your recordings. Click on the menu icon in the upper left corner, then scroll down to “my recordings“ for a full list by date and location.

Good birding,
Lindagal2


Merlin song ID QUESTION

Sally M. Walters
 

Am I correct that the Merlin song app only keeps your recordings for a day or so on your phone?  If so, is there a way to review last weeks recordings? 

I evidently missed Mt chickadee on my eBird list per a friend and wanted to review my recorded list before I decided what to do.  If this is true then it is disappointing.  I thought eBird was wrong a few times only to discover later that it was correct.  

One solution would be to take a cell phone photo of the list and save it for later.

Thanks

Sally M Walters
Sacramento


Tall Forest bird survey this coming Saturday

Glennah Trochet
 

Dear Birders,

After a long hiatus, the public is again invited to participate in the Tall Forest bird surveys.  The next iteration is this coming Saturday, 18 June.  We will depart promptly through the locked Farm Center gate, corner of Bruceville and Desmond Roads, at 5:00 a.m.  Advanced registration is now requested by the preserve staff and may be made on the website, www.cosumnes.org.  Click on the Events button and find the bird survey on the calendar that should come up.

Mosquitoes have been moderately noisome.  Bring repellent.  The only mud is on a short stretch of the route near the Accidental Forest.  We'll be able to walk around the worst of it.  I have been cleaning up the trails the last couple of days, so most of the route is easily passable.

If coming from or through Sacramento, allow some extra time so as not to be left at the gate.  The interchange of Highway 50 and I-5 will be closed next weekend.  You may wish to take Highway 99 south from town to Twin Cities Road, then west on Twin Cities Road to the lower Preserve.

More or less recent birds of note behind the gate include persisting territorial yellow warblers at the Accidental Forest, a singing willow flycatcher today at a private inholding northeast of the equipment pad, and dwindling numbers of tricolored blackbirds (640 a week ago down to 80 this morning).  The last trickle of spring migrant Swainson's thrushes was detected on 05 June.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento


Glossy Ibis south of Marysville

Asher Perla
 

Hi Birders,

Liam Huber and I just found a Glossy Ibis among a flock of over 1000 White-faced in a rice check on Plumas Arboga Road in Yuba County south of Marysville near Plumas Lake.

See our eBird checklist for details. 

This is a first county record. 

Good birding! 

Asher Perla
Oregon House
California


Re: Nesting Purple Martins in Bangor, Butte County!!!

Andy Engilis
 

Martins are fairly nomadic in Sierra, and exploit old fire landscapes.  So I suspect the increased sightings are related to the numerous fires in Sierra.

Andy

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


From: centralvalleybirds@groups.io <centralvalleybirds@groups.io> on behalf of Asher Perla via groups.io <asher.perla@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2022 7:27:52 AM
To: Central Valley Birds <centralvalleybirds@groups.io>; County Birds <countybirders@groups.io>
Subject: [centralvalleybirds] Nesting Purple Martins in Bangor, Butte County!!!
 
Hey folks,

Liam Huber and I just found a nesting pair of Purple Martins in Bangor! They are using a cavity in a power pole here: 39.384250,-121.399042. 

When viewing, please keep your distance as they can be quite sensitive. This is only the second instance of potential breeding that we're aware of in Butte in recent decades! There is plenty of room to park off the road around this location.

I'm very curious as to what the reason behind so many new findings of Martins at new locations in the past years is. Is it just better coverage? Or could Martin populations in the foothills be recovering slightly, or at least redistributing from valley locations or something like that?

Good birding!

Asher Perla
Oregon House, Yuba County


Re: Nesting Purple Martins in Bangor, Butte County!!!

Dan Airola
 

This is a great find!  It is hard to know if the recent records indicate some recovery or better coverage by knowledgeable observers. Many records are are concentrated in the area of Oregon House, which result largely from your interest.  But the detection of martins in the breeding season at new nearby sites (this one, Englebright Reservoir) suggests some expansion from this area which is highly welcome.  I do not see other recent breeding season records in eBird away from the few known locations in the foothills.  (Note that second-year birds are still moving through in early May).

One thing is pretty clear to me - these martins are not likely to be coming from the Central Valley. Other than in Sacramento, there have been very few breeding martins in the Valley since the 1980s (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/239616154_PURPLE_MARTIN_POPULATION_STATUS_NESTING_HABITAT_CHARACTERISTICS_AND_MANAGEMENT_IN_SACRAMENTO_CALIFORNIA.  The Sacramento colonies appear to have declined substantially again this year, but we won't know for certain until early July.  Numbers of second-year birds that begin nesting late have not been fully determined yet. 


I plan to check a record with photos of 3 birds made by knowledgeable observers in Galt on 21 May, which is very surprising. I encourage everyone to be on the lookout for martins and to report them in eBird with any evidence of breeding behavior.

Dan Airola
Sacramento 



On Tuesday, May 31, 2022, 07:55:00 AM PDT, Asher Perla <asher.perla@...> wrote:


Hey folks,

Liam Huber and I just found a nesting pair of Purple Martins in Bangor! They are using a cavity in a power pole here: 39.384250,-121.399042. 

When viewing, please keep your distance as they can be quite sensitive. This is only the second instance of potential breeding that we're aware of in Butte in recent decades! There is plenty of room to park off the road around this location.

I'm very curious as to what the reason behind so many new findings of Martins at new locations in the past years is. Is it just better coverage? Or could Martin populations in the foothills be recovering slightly, or at least redistributing from valley locations or something like that?

Good birding!

Asher Perla
Oregon House, Yuba County


Nesting Purple Martins in Bangor, Butte County!!!

Asher Perla
 

Hey folks,

Liam Huber and I just found a nesting pair of Purple Martins in Bangor! They are using a cavity in a power pole here: 39.384250,-121.399042. 

When viewing, please keep your distance as they can be quite sensitive. This is only the second instance of potential breeding that we're aware of in Butte in recent decades! There is plenty of room to park off the road around this location.

I'm very curious as to what the reason behind so many new findings of Martins at new locations in the past years is. Is it just better coverage? Or could Martin populations in the foothills be recovering slightly, or at least redistributing from valley locations or something like that?

Good birding!

Asher Perla
Oregon House, Yuba County

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