BBC4W for a Linux


Richard Russell
 

---In bb4w@yahoogroups.com, <davidfeugey@yahoo.com> wrote :
> don't believe people that tell you it's just a packaging issue. It's not. It's a compiling
> issue too, because of the versions of the libs present on each OS.


That confuses me, because no libraries are included when it is compiled. The only things in the executable file I create are the object code of my assembler modules, the compiled object code from a C 'wrapper' module I have written, and the compiled object code from a customised version of SDL2_gfx. There will also presumably be some startup code which is automatically added by GCC, but I would not have expected it to be specific to the flavour of Linux.


So how is it a compiling issue? I realise that the libs present on each OS are likely to be platform-specific, but so long as they are dynamically linked at run-time I don't understand why it would require my code to be recompiled. Surely the ELF file format is standardised across Linux flavours?



> the question is 'do you target Linux users or BBC Basic users'.


Well, at this stage I am targeting only people who use *both*. What I am primarily interested in is getting feedback on the functionality of the software, reports of bugs and other performance issues, suggestions for possible additions and modifications, and help with porting existing BASIC programs to the new SDL platform. The only people who can do that are those who are already very familiar with both BBC BASIC and Linux. I am assuming that such people exist!


> But BBC Basic users will love to get BBC4L


So where are they? I have seen little evidence of any enthusiasm for it. Like you, I thought there would be some excitement about the new version, considering how often a Linux version or a Mac OS version of BBC BASIC have been asked for. Perhaps those people gave up waiting; to be fair I have always - honestly - said that I had no plans to create either, so that might have put them off. Somehow, although I was vaguely aware of SDL, I had not twigged until very recently that it would allow me to create a Linux version, and potentially also a Mac OS version, very easily.


> (and even pay for it).


It will be free. I am not interested in creating additional paid-for software; BBC BASIC for Windows is, and will remain, my only commercial product.



So I will wait, not very patiently, for somebody to show some interest in the (admittedly very early) version of 'BBC BASIC for Linux' that I uploaded yesterday. I want to know if it runs on anybody else's system, particularly if it's different from my own (32-bit Ubuntu 14.04.3). I want to know if it's what people want!


Richard.


svein svensson
 

I'm interested, but i do not have linux at the moment.
Have not used it for years.
When there is some spare time, i will try to get one up and running from spare parts.

Svein


Dave Sergeant
 

Having just started playing with a Raspberry Pi I may be sort of
interested. I see SDL has been installed on the Pi so it should work.
But being totally new to it and only played occasionally with Linux in
the past, together with never having heard of SDL before you started
this, it may take a little while...

I think the demand is there but don't think it will happen overnight.

Dave

On 19 Dec 2015 at 14:33, yahoo@rtrussell.co.uk [bb4w] wrote:

But BBC Basic users will love to get BBC4L

So where are they? I have seen little evidence of any enthusiasm for
it. Like you, I thought there would be some
excitement about the new version, considering how often a Linux version
or a Mac OS version of BBC BASIC have been asked for. Perhaps those
people gave up waiting; to be fair I have always - honestly - said that
I had no plans to create either, so that might have put them off.
Somehow, although I was vaguely aware of SDL, I had not twigged until
very recently that it would allow me to create a Linux version, and
potentially also a Mac OS version, very easily.

http://davesergeant.com


Richard Russell
 

---In bb4w@yahoogroups.com, <dave@davesergeant.com> wrote :
> Having just started playing with a Raspberry Pi I may be sort of
> interested. I see SDL has been installed on the Pi so it should work.


I am not sure whether that was tongue-in-cheek, but of course (and as emphasised repeatedly in these threads) the RPi uses entirely the wrong processor: an ARM rather than an x86 (IA-32-architdecture).


That SDL supports the Raspberry Pi, to a degree, is irrelevant if my BBC BASIC interpreter can't run! It's exactly the same for Android: I am always careful to state Android (86), a rarity compared with the great majority of devices which have ARM CPUs. Admittedly I am less careful always to say Linux (86), but nobody here or at other BB4W forums should be confused, any more than they are by me referring simply to Windows rather than Windows (86).


But do lend your support to the efforts being made to port compatible versions of BBC BASIC to RPi/Linux, notably Brandy and Sophie's ARM version. In fact I think Brandy is already available, although I don't have any details. I need hardly add that if you install RISC OS on the Pi you get BBC BASIC as standard!


Richard.


Bob Allison
 

Hi All

I've just come across this discussion and feel that I ought to chip in. I've dabbled with Linux, Ubuntu, Mint Puppy etc each with strengths and weaknesses.

I saw the Raspberry Pi come to market and thought that it was a great tool for helping people of all ages get into dabbling with computers with simple programming to begin with and the ability to grow via its IO capabilities as the user's skills develop.

This gives me a great sense of De-Ja-Vue because this is acting as a modern re-incarnation of the BBC Micro phenomenon in the 80's.I progressed from cassette to floppy disk storage, drove a 3d router with one etc, etc.

My wife has set me a simple programming challenge over hte Christmas break and I could have downloaded the Android developer kit and learn that, but I've loaded up my BBC Basic originally purchased on floppy disk, run the upgrades and in a couple of days 've got the thing running. Of course now she's suggesting upgrades and modifications, but that the fun f it. And FUN is the key word. I'm actually in clover. It feels like I've put on a rediscovered pair of comfortable slippers and I'm back remembering how to make it do what I want with a modern Windows interface.

The Pi strikes me as being an ideal platform for BBC Basic, and now is the time. I don't have one but I imagine that many have been purchased and played with and probably discarded because of the hassle of it not being very very user friendly.

Stick BBC Basic on it so that it boots straight into BBC Basic prompt, under what ever interface you choose, Gui or text, and I think you have a winner. Even I would probably buy one to play with.

Don't get disheartened by negative comments if the Linux/Unix fanatics can't see the overall benefit ignore them and focus on the Pi where you really could make a difference especially with all the teachers in school who were brought up on BBC Basic.

Sorry about the long post but encouragement is needed

Bob


Daniel Bingamon
 

"Boots straight into BBC Basic", that so much
reminds me of the old school computers boot straight into BASIC.

Daniel Bingamon

At 07:33 AM 12/25/2015, you wrote:


"Stick BBC Basic on it so that it boots straight
into BBC Basic prompt, under what ever interface
you choose, Gui or text, and I think you have a
winner. Even I would probably buy one to play with."

This is a completely different subject. BBC
Basic for Windows or Linux is x86 only. if you
want something that boots directly with Basic on
the Pi, simply use ARM BBC Basic, under RISC OS
Pico or BootToBasic (www.riscos.fr).

But I agree: BBC Basic for x86 Linux, graphical
or console mode (for CGI), is really an
important project. Free or not (of course, it's better if it's free).

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