Date   

Re: SOCKLIB

Richard Russell
 

On Sat, Jul 29, 2017 at 03:29 pm, Cecil Bayona wrote:
Raspberries 3, I bought 2 I should have bought 5 which was the limit.
At $10 each you definitely should!

Dare I reiterate my plea for somebody to help port 'sdldebug.bbc' from x86 to ARM code?  Currently, developing BBC BASIC programs on the RPi is made more difficult by the absence of a debugger (trace + list variables) and profiler.   I am confident that anybody who knows ARM assembly language (which doesn't include me), plus a little familiarity with x86 assembler, would not find the translation difficult.  There must surely be such people here.

Richard.


Re: SOCKLIB

Cecil Bayona
 

Raspberries 3, I bought 2 I should have bought 5 which was the limit.

On 7/29/2017 5:17 PM, Richard Russell wrote:
On Sat, Jul 29, 2017 at 11:36 am, Cecil Bayona wrote:
I have a couple of Raspberries I bought on sale for $10 but they are
still in their sealed boxes
If these are older models (RPi 2 or earlier) they may not run BBC BASIC. BBCSDL has only been tested on the Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Jessie plus the 'experimental' GL Driver.

> are there options where extra software is not needed?
Possibly you could talk directly to the OS. I couldn't provide any assistance with that (I know nothing about Linux), and of course it would make your program platform-specific which from my perspective is undesirable, but if you want to try it obviously that's up to you.
Richard.


Re: SOCKLIB

Richard Russell
 

On Sat, Jul 29, 2017 at 11:36 am, Cecil Bayona wrote:
I have a couple of Raspberries I bought on sale for $10 but they are still in their sealed boxes
If these are older models (RPi 2 or earlier) they may not run BBC BASIC.  BBCSDL has only been tested on the Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Jessie plus the 'experimental' GL Driver.

> are there options where extra software is not needed?

Possibly you could talk directly to the OS.  I couldn't provide any assistance with that (I know nothing about Linux), and of course it would make your program platform-specific which from my perspective is undesirable, but if you want to try it obviously that's up to you.

Richard.


Re: Acces to distant computer by internet

Richard Russell
 

On Sat, Jul 29, 2017 at 11:21 am, CHABI Salomon wrote:
Can anybody describe me a way to access distant computer with a BBC
Basic programme?
You don't say what software will be running on the remote computer.  If you are planning on writing the code for *both* ends then it's pretty straightforward: you can use SOCKLIB to establish a connection between the machines and then everything is under your control.  You may have to devise your own protocol(s) for communicating between the two ends, but that need not be complicated.  It's no different from communicating between two processes on the same PC using sockets: you can use exactly the same code (any timeouts may need to be longer when connected via the internet, of course).

However if you are hoping to access the remote computer by writing code only at *one* end it will potentially be more difficult, because you would be forced to use a standard protocol that you can be sure the remote machine has built-in support for.  Hopefully that won't be necessary.

Richard.


Re: SOCKLIB

Storer, Darren
 

Hi Richard,

Multi-platform SOCKLIB support, especailly on Android and Raspberry Pi would be a boon; I have a number of remote monitoring projects that could be easily realised with this addition.

Apologies for the slow reply, I've been working away and have only just reviewed my e-mails.

Thanks again for your continued development effort.

Regards

Darren


On 29 July 2017 at 12:57, Richard Russell <news@...> wrote:
On Wed, Jul 26, 2017 at 01:27 am, Richard Russell wrote:
what do other people think?
So, nobody has any opinion at all?  I would greatly appreciate it if one (or more) of those who are apparently indifferent to the cross-platform version of BBC BASIC could explain why.   Is there really such antipathy towards operating systems and platforms other than Windows?  Even if competitive 'desktop' OSes hold no interest, surely most people these days have some kind of mobile device (smartphone, tablet etc.) on which they might like to run BASIC?

Richard.



Re: SOCKLIB

Cecil Bayona
 

A little context in the email might be helpful as is I had to go to the groups page to find the original email.

Personally I will be using BBC Basic for Linux and MacOS shortly, eventually I will get to the Raspberry version as currently I have a couple of Raspberries I bought on sale for $10 but they are still in their sealed boxes, currently I have more projects going than what I can handle. A socket library I would think would be particularly useful as IOT applications are quite often used with Raspberries.

If one has to install extra software to make it work then so be it, are there options where extra software is not needed? If not then there is no decision to make.

An yes I can see that a Basic language for Raspberry or Android would be quite useful as the programming options sometimes are too limited.

On 7/29/2017 6:57 AM, Richard Russell wrote:
On Wed, Jul 26, 2017 at 01:27 am, Richard Russell wrote:
what do other people think?
So, nobody has any opinion at all? I would greatly appreciate it if one (or more) of those who are apparently indifferent to the cross-platform version of BBC BASIC could explain why. Is there really such antipathy towards operating systems and platforms other than Windows? Even if competitive 'desktop' OSes hold no interest, surely most people these days have some kind of mobile device (smartphone, tablet etc.) on which they might like to run BASIC?
Richard.


Acces to distant computer by internet

 

Dear Sirs,

Can anybody describe me a way to access distant computer with a BBC
Basic programme? For instance suppose I want to update some programmes
or to transfer data or files to a distant computer through
internet,how can I proceed?

Best regards

--
Salomon CHABI


Re: SOCKLIB

Richard Russell
 

On Wed, Jul 26, 2017 at 01:27 am, Richard Russell wrote:
what do other people think?
So, nobody has any opinion at all?  I would greatly appreciate it if one (or more) of those who are apparently indifferent to the cross-platform version of BBC BASIC could explain why.   Is there really such antipathy towards operating systems and platforms other than Windows?  Even if competitive 'desktop' OSes hold no interest, surely most people these days have some kind of mobile device (smartphone, tablet etc.) on which they might like to run BASIC?

Richard.


Re: SOCKLIB

Richard Russell
 

On Tue, Jul 25, 2017 at 11:31 pm, <bb4w@...> wrote:
Does anyone have plans to release a version of the SOCKLIB for the
raspberry pi?
One unresolved issue is what dependencies it is acceptable for 'BBC BASIC for SDL 2.0' (BBCSDL) to have.  At the moment it depends (of course) on SDL2 itself, and on SDL_ttf for the font handling.  In order to support the SOCKLIB library it would also need to have a dependency on SDL_net.

The downsides of an additional dependency are that the Android and Mac OS versions would get bigger (because of the inclusion of SDL_net in the package) and the Linux and Raspberry Pi versions would be a bit harder to install (because of the necessity to download SDL_net from the appropriate repository).

The release of the next version is imminent (next week) so it's too late to consider the inclusion of SDL_net in that - it's a pity you didn't respond to the 'BBCSDL v0.18 wish list' thread - but we can at least initiate a discussion on its desirability.  I presume you would be in favour, what do other people think?

Richard.


SOCKLIB

bb4w@...
 

Hello all
Does anyone have plans to release a version of the SOCKLIB for the
raspberry pi?

Regards
Ian Karley


BBC BASIC for Windows version 6.11a released

Richard Russell
 

I'm pleased to announce the release of BBC BASIC for Windows version 6.11a. This is a maintenance release to address a couple of minor issues that have arisen since the release of v6.10a, as follows:

  1. A bug affecting the *HARDCOPY command, which very regrettably was introduced in v6.10a, has been fixed.

  2. The *DISPLAY and *MDISPLAY commands now accept 'top down' BMP files, despite their validity being somewhat doubtful. A recent thread here discussed this issue.

  3. As a bonus side-effect of (2), the *DISPLAY and *MDISPLAY commands can now flip the image horizontally and/or vertically by specifying a negative width and/or height (but not if the 'transparent colour' option is used).

To upgrade your copy of BBC BASIC for Windows to version 6.11a download and install UPGRADE.EXE from here:

http://www.rtrussell.co.uk/bbcwin/download.html

You may receive security warnings from Windows. That issue will resolve itself eventually when the files have been downloaded a sufficient number of times for them to have gained a 'reputation' for safety.

Richard.


Re: Calling ARM programmers

John Alfred
 

I'm in Adare, Co Limerick.

Look me up and I'll lay on some rain !
And a cup of T.



From: J.G.Harston <jgh@...>
To: bb4w@groups.io
Sent: Saturday, 15 July 2017, 16:16
Subject: Re: [bb4w] Calling ARM programmers

Richard Russell wrote:
> J.G.Harston wrote:
>> I've downloaded the code to look at it, but I'm about to set off for
>> the
>> airport for a fortnight in Ireland.
> You'll need something to do while you shelter from the rain....

I am taking my laptop.... :)

jgh







Re: Calling ARM programmers

J.G.Harston
 

Richard Russell wrote:
J.G.Harston wrote:
I've downloaded the code to look at it, but I'm about to set off for the
airport for a fortnight in Ireland.
You'll need something to do while you shelter from the rain....
I am taking my laptop.... :)

jgh


Re: Calling ARM programmers

Richard Russell
 

On Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 09:58 am, J.G.Harston wrote:
I've downloaded the code to look at it, but I'm about to set off for the
airport for a fortnight in Ireland.
You'll need something to do while you shelter from the rain....


Re: Calling ARM programmers

J.G.Harston
 

Richard Russell wrote:
Richard Russell wrote:
I would greatly appreciate it if somebody would volunteer to write
and test the required code.
Do I have to beg, or offer a cash reward, to get a response? If it's
the latter, I'm open to negotiation!
I've downloaded the code to look at it, but I'm about to set off for the
airport for a fortnight in Ireland.

--
J.G.Harston - jgh@... - mdfs.net/jgh


Re: Calling ARM programmers

Richard Russell
 

On Fri, Jul 7, 2017 at 06:46 am, Richard Russell wrote:
I would greatly appreciate it if somebody would volunteer to write and test the required code.
Do I have to beg, or offer a cash reward, to get a response? If it's the latter, I'm open to negotiation!

Richard.


Calling ARM programmers

Richard Russell
 

Those of you who have tried the Raspberry Pi edition of BBCSDL will have spotted that neither the Run... Debug nor Run... Profile options are available. This is because both rely on 'sdldebug.bbc' (in the @lib$ folder) which contains a substantial amount of assembler code, which of course is x86-specific.

It would obviously be highly desirable for those debugging options to work on the RPi, but to do so it will require an ARM version of 'sdldebug.bbc' to be written. Since I'm not an ARM programmer (far from it!) this is not something I can contribute to.

There must be people here with a background in programming the Acorn Archimedes or RISC PC, who have some experience with ARM assembly language. I would greatly appreciate it if somebody would volunteer to write and test the required code.

Richard.


Re: Apple phasing out 32-bit support

Richard Russell
 

On Fri, Jul 7, 2017 at 01:15 am, Paul Marshall wrote:
I dont know how you do it but I am pleased you still can.
On the contrary really: the deterioration in my mental faculties is very apparent.  I do find that straightforward BASIC programming (e.g. without any assembler code) is still within my grasp however, which I suppose justifies its existence.  The objective, which I've substantially achieved, is that you should be able to write BBC BASIC code without having to worry (much) about whether it's going to run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS, Android or Raspberry Pi.

I appreciate that most members of this group probably came here through BB4W initially, but I would like all BBC BASIC enthusiasts to give a second platform a try, whether it be Android on their mobile device, Linux or Mac OS on a desktop, or - something of a half-way-house and extremely cheap (if a bit slow) - a Raspberry Pi.

Richard.


Re: Apple phasing out 32-bit support

Paul Marshall
 

I reiterate nbadderley's comment. There was a time (in the 80's) when I was on top of the technology but I find it impossible to keep up nowadays. I dont know how you do it but I am pleased you still can.


Re: Apple phasing out 32-bit support

J.G.Harston
 

Richard Russell wrote:
This will be incorporated in the next release of BBCSDL - unless I get no
reaction and have to conclude that nobody (except me) cares. :(
I care, go ahead, it's useful. I do a similar thing going the other way
with my Tube Clients for CPUs with registers larger than 8 bits, OSBYTE
returns its two 8-bit results in both the 16-bit/32-bit Y register analogue
and the 16-bit/32-bit X register analog as X+Y*256.

--
J.G.Harston - jgh@... - mdfs.net/jgh

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