Date   

Re: Total number of users

mangguo@...
 
Edited

 Indeed I can't help thinking that there must be members of this group with suitable devices who haven't yet asked to be added; if that's the case I would be interested to learn why not.  I'd be disappointed if you can't see the point of running BBC BASIC on a mobile device.
I do appreciate cross compatibility a lot generally speaking - but in this case... well I am one of these (with a few phones / tablets that I received on various occasions) - I can see the point of running BBC BASIC on a mobile device but I just don't use / like mobile devices at all. I did try and I did have to use it for work (worked on a few published apps), but the magic of mobile devices simply doesn't work on me, that's all. Personal preference really, I just like using desktop environment much more for various reasons. Hopefully this doesn't make me a bad guy!

Re: Your purchase of BBC BASIC for Windows is FOR LIFE

mangguo@...
 

I don't remember if I actually did it with BB4W but I often do this (buy multiple copies) - I must quickly add that it's almost always (or at least I can't remember a different case) for family members and similar reasons already mentioned. Isn't this quite common?

Whatever the case: thank you Richard for offering BB4W under such terms - off the top of my head I can't think of any other paid program I use that is not "rented" anymore.

Re: Total number of users

R.E.
 

Richard a question please
   I have your basic installed on my windows laptop and I've written a program for my self that
I use a lot.  can I port that to my Android powered Samsung Galaxy?  If so how do I go
about doing so?   (I really really like your program)
-Stephen Hatch
Dewey Arizona

Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Paul Hooper
 

Thank you very much for the lead. Paul

Paul Hooper, Barrington Publications, Riverside Studios, 65 Aspenlea Road, London, W6 8LH
tel 020 8237 1180, em ph@..., web www.barringtonpublications.com

Standard e-mail privacy protocols apply.

On 07/06/2018 06:06, Robin Hodson wrote:
On 6/6/2018 1839, Paul Hooper wrote:
...
is there anyone in West London who might have a moment to spend a couple 
of hours or so (paid) on a BBC4W program that parses text and produces a 
website? I don't have time . . .
You could try ROUGOL, who meet monthly in central London, and run
an exhibition in Feltham every October:
http://rougol.jellybaby.net/meetings/index.html
http://www.riscoslondonshow.co.uk/venue.php


Sincerely,
Robin Hodson

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Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Robin Hodson
 

On 6/6/2018 1839, Paul Hooper wrote:
...
is there anyone in West London who might have a moment to spend a couple
of hours or so (paid) on a BBC4W program that parses text and produces a
website? I don't have time . . .
You could try ROUGOL, who meet monthly in central London, and run
an exhibition in Feltham every October:
http://rougol.jellybaby.net/meetings/index.html
http://www.riscoslondonshow.co.uk/venue.php


Sincerely,
Robin Hodson

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Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Paul Hooper
 

as a fringe but daily BB4W user what is all this about Richard leaving - why? he is BBC for B everything?

is there anyone in West London who might have a moment to spend a couple of hours or so (paid) on a BBC4W program that parses text and produces a website? I don't have time . . .

upset?

Paul Hooper, Barrington Publications, Riverside Studios, 65 Aspenlea Road, London, W6 8LH
tel 020 8237 1180, em ph@..., web www.barringtonpublications.com

Standard e-mail privacy protocols apply.

On 06/06/2018 10:50, Paul Marshall wrote:
Richard has (rightly) admonished me for pouring cold water on your idea - I was thinking only of the quickest way to solve your puzzle.
He has pointed out that scaling and rotating an image is a straightforward task (particularly for BBCSDL), as 'Xmas Demo II' demonstrates. 

He is unable to respond himself as after the 'upset' he withdrew from both the group and the forum. 
It is ridiculous that Richard should feel he has to leave so therefore I shall as well.

Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Paul Marshall
 

Richard has (rightly) admonished me for pouring cold water on your idea - I was thinking only of the quickest way to solve your puzzle.
He has pointed out that scaling and rotating an image is a straightforward task (particularly for BBCSDL), as 'Xmas Demo II' demonstrates. 

He is unable to respond himself as after the 'upset' he withdrew from both the group and the forum. 
It is ridiculous that Richard should feel he has to leave so therefore I shall as well.

Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Paul Marshall
 

The images are not bad. The first thing you will need to do is make the background transparent which with your white background will be easy. Then you need to adjust the scale which if you include a ruler in each photo will make that much easier. Then you will need to free rotate and move one image.  Then finally you need to be able to zoom in and out. Zoom in to fine tune the adjustment and then zoom out to view the whole picture.  I think this is all readliy doable but It's a major challenge. Sadly I dont have time to be any help, I wish you luck.
I dont want to pour cold water on a BB4W project but I was able to do all those steps in seconds in Serif PagePlus.  

Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Andrew Cool
 

Hi Paul,

Matching A + B should be dead easy, as they come from one piece of rock that split as it was excavated. That's why I've labelled them as Twin_A and Twin_B.

>you talk about scaling yet i would have thought a ruler would be included in each image so you can match the sizes.

The pieces were roughly laid out on what passed for a clear patch of ground, after being roughly sorted by thickness of each piece of rock, which produced some rough groupings by texture and colour. There was no neat lab bench jig with good lighting to photograph each piece with a scale - only me with my camera phone standing unsupported trying to get decent overlap between all the images. Also, almost all the fossil bearing rocks stay at the site unless they are especially significant Museum quality specimens, so lab-bench photography is probably out of the question anyway. Next time I'll make the effort to take a tripod and DSLR to make a better job of the imaging, but for now what I have to work with is what you see online. I can't afford to be picky as there's nothing else to pick from...

The scaling problem is interesting, because as soon as you match two pieces, and join them into a new larger piece, in order to fit that new larger piece on screen along with a new piece
to try and match, both pieces are probably going to have to be downscaled in order to fit in the available screen real estate - and that problem only gets worse as more pieces are successfully added to the jigsaw. Say I have 10 pieces, of which 9 have been successfully jigsawed together. That large 9 piece segment has to fit on the screen with room for piece #10 to move around it.

Hours of fun ;-)

Andrew

Re: Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Paul Marshall
 

I dont see why not. An interesting challenge.
Just for fun I tried to match your A and B images. Not easy is it!
One thing surprises me - you talk about scaling yet i would have thought a ruler would be included in each image so you can match the sizes.

Multiple Mega Sprites possible?

Andrew Cool
 

I think this is a question for Richard's expertise.

I recently volunteered on a fossil hunting expedition with the South Australian Museum and University of Adelaide. One task I was given in the field was to attempt to
jigsaw together numerous random pices of fossil bearing rock.I failed hopelessly.

I did find myself thinking "This calls for a computer solution...", i.e. a program that displays images of the pieces of rock that can be individually rotated, transalted and most probably scaled as well, so that the user can attempt to fit edges and surface texture and fossil imprints on screen in the comfort of their lab.

BB4W and its ability to use sprites came to mind, though there's a cautionary note in the Help that the size of sprite BMP files must be "within reason" or words to that effect.

I've put some example images of pieces of fossil bearing rock online at :-

http://www.cool.id.au/Fossils/Twins_A.jpg
http://www.cool.id.au/Fossils/Twins_B.jpg and
http://www.cool.id.au/Fossils/rock_1.jpg

Twins A and B are known matches - the rock split as it was excavated.

Also online is a panoramic image of some 60 pieces of fossil rock excavated within a small area :-

http://www.cool.id.au/Fossils/Fossil_sort_pano%20halfsize.jpg

Matching the pieces is complicated. As the fossil bed is on a hillside, over millions of years the pieces of rock migrate downhill.
Some are exposed face up on the surface, some lying face down on the surface. Some are bured at any angle. All are variously weathered and may be variously
coloured due to differential weathering and chemical exposure.

The pieces in the panorama may not be contiguous - there may be gaps where we have not found the "missing link" piece of rock.
I can extract the individual pieces of rock from the images using PhotoShop, fairly easyily if a little tedious. Far more successful using the human eye/brain than
edge finding algorithms in this situation.

So the question is, "Can BB4W handle multiple large sprites (~1000x1000 pixels), and move them around the screen under mouse or cursor control in near real time?"
Assumption : A workstation class PC with ample memory, grunt and large real estate monitor.

Regards,

Andrew


Re: Total number of users

 

Please me also in the record.

Salomon CHABI

2018-05-15 3:15 GMT+01:00 R.E. <hatch@...>:

  I would be interested but I've been busy porting my old progs using your BBC Basic.Trying to get up to speed. I'm rusty.
 I have an Android (Samsung Galaxy)  that I'd like to experiment on but I haven't had time so I didn't ask to be added.
 If you think it is appropriate, then I'd like to be included.
-Steve Hatch
Dewey Arizona




--
Salomon CHABI

Re: Total number of users

R.E.
 

  I would be interested but I've been busy porting my old progs using your BBC Basic.Trying to get up to speed. I'm rusty.
 I have an Android (Samsung Galaxy)  that I'd like to experiment on but I haven't had time so I didn't ask to be added.
 If you think it is appropriate, then I'd like to be included.
-Steve Hatch
Dewey Arizona

Re: Printing Graphics or should I say - not printing graphics.

bobsmail@...
 

Thank you Mr. Hartston.  You are correct.  My printers do not respond to even a line command although I have threatened both with possible recycling.  In fact if my HP printer sees the word print it prints out the entire program itself in nice colors.  Pretty - but of little value.  I have tried speaking directly to my printers as you suggest but they just seem to ignore me.

Thanks for your reply

Bob Horton
Canada

Re: Printing Graphics or should I say - not printing graphics.

J.G.Harston
 

bobsmail wrote:
I am using the VDU 2 command to enable my printer but lo and behold my
document prints but without any graphics
VDU 2 sends the following VDU stream to the printer. If your printer
does not understand (for example) VDU 25,x;y; to plot or draw a line
then your printer won't plot or draw a line.

VDU 2/3 is ok for sending text to a printer or doing low-level printer
control with VDU 1,byte but if you want the image displayed in your
BBFW output window to appear on your printout, you either need to
rewrite your program to talk directly to the printer using the printer's
graphics language, or do a screen-dump of the BBFW output window witeg the *HARDCOPY command.

--
J.G.Harston - jgh@... - mdfs.net/jgh

Printing Graphics or should I say - not printing graphics.

bobsmail@...
 

I am using the VDU 2 command to enable my printer but lo and behold my document prints but without any graphics - including my beautiful pi graph (Thanks to Richard) and any other graphics such as my alt-7- squares I am using for a line graphs. Most frustrating.  Of course I can always do all this using EXCEL  - which is easy - as it does all the work for you - determining averages, standard deviations etc. -  but  I like doing it with BASIC determining my own statistics - plus everything  looks nice on the screen provided I stick with one font. 

PS The first time I ran my programs was on a TI 99 and possibly before that on a Timex Sinclair.  That's how far I go back . First program I wrote was on punch cards.

Bob Horton - Manitoba, Canada
grandvalleyresearch.com

Using serial port in BBCSDL for Rasp Pi.

Tomas Ponzi
 

Hi all,

Trying to develop a real world application using BBCSDL for Rasp Pi.

For BB4W the code is:

REM a simple terminal program.
      Port% = OPENUP "COM1: baud=9600 parity=N data=8 stop=1"
      REM Port% is a global variable
      IF Port% = 0 PRINT "Could not open COM1" : END
etc...

Is this somehow implemented in BBCSDL.

For Rasp Pi the port in question is /dev/ttyS0

All the best,

Tomas

Joystick range (ARM editions)

Richard Russell
 

To my irritation and embarrassment, I've just discovered that the ARM editions of BBCSDL return the wrong range of values from ADVAL(1) to ADVAL(3). Rather than being 0 to 65535, as they should be (and are in other versions of BBC BASIC, including the x86 editions of BBCSDL), they are -32768 to +32767. An offset that needed to be applied wasn't.

I've now fixed this and updated the relevant editions (Android, iOS, Raspberry Pi) accordingly. In the unlikely event that you have written a program that relies on the incorrect range, you will need to amend it.

Richard.

Re: rounding integers

Richard Russell
 

Back in 1981, when BBC BASIC was created, keywords needing to be in capital letters was the norm, I think.  I certainly have no recollection of that aspect of the language ever being questioned, or indeed that it was an issue at all.  Of much greater concern was the efficiency with which programs could be squeezed into the tiny amounts of memory available (as little as 5 Kbytes in some BBC Micro screen modes) which is what led to the characteristic that most BBC BASIC keywords do not need to be followed by a space or other delimiter.

So in BBC BASIC it is legal to write y=INTABSSINRADx and all four keywords - INT, ABS, SIN, RAD -  will be recognised despite the absence of any delimiters, resulting in the program being a little shorter and faster (that code is only 7 bytes).   However this property has an undesirable consequence: it significantly reduces your choice of variable names because one only needs to start with a keyword for it to be invalid.  So variable names such as PRINTER (starts with PRINT) or TIMER (starts with TIME) are unusable.

This restriction would probably have been unacceptable had it not been for the fact that keywords must be in capitals, so variable names like printer or timer may be used.  But of course if you enable the Lowercase Keywords mode in BB4W or BBCSDL those variable names - and a whole load more that you might otherwise like to use - do indeed become invalid.  You can, at least, avoid the problem by using mixed case variable names, for example Printer and Timer are always valid.

Richard.

Re: rounding integers

bobsmail@...
 

Richard

Be astounded no longer. I see that lower case was selected although I do not remember selecting it.  Anyway it has been deselected although everything runs the same.  Now I have to get used to UPPER CASE commands.


B ob Horton