Astrometrica without observatory code


Mohammed Fadil Talafha
 


Dear all 
How i can use astrometrica without observatory code ? Can I add the coordinates. Manually and other parameters or there is other solution?
Thanks all
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Mohammed Fadil Talafha
Research Assistant
Sharjah Academy for Astronomy, Space sciences & Technology
E: 
mtalafha@...
T: 
+97165166102 | 
M: 
P.O.Box: 27272 Sharjah, UAE | W: www.saasst.ae
  


Umair Asim
 

You can easily use the software and the settings without any code assigned.

Regards,

Umair Asim
www.edenobservatory.com
www.lahoreastronomy.com

President: Lahore Astronomical Society
Joint Secretary: Khwarizmi Science Society
Director: CBSAP Pakistan
Mentor@American Association for Variable Star Observers

Owner: Zeds Astronomical Observatory & Eden Astronomical Observatory
Minor Planet Center (IAU) Observatory Code N30 & N31


From: astrometrica@groups.io <astrometrica@groups.io> on behalf of Mohammed Fadil Talafha <mtalafha@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 2, 2020 6:58:59 PM
To: astrometrica@groups.io <astrometrica@groups.io>
Subject: [astrometrica] Astrometrica without observatory code
 

Dear all 
How i can use astrometrica without observatory code ? Can I add the coordinates. Manually and other parameters or there is other solution?
Thanks all
Facebook Twitter FlickR YouTube
Instagram
     
Mohammed Fadil Talafha
Research Assistant
Sharjah Academy for Astronomy, Space sciences & Technology
E: 
mtalafha@...
T: 
+97165166102  | 
M: 
P.O.Box:  27272 Sharjah, UAE  |  W:  www.saasst.ae
   


Gerald McKeegan
 


Mohammed,
 
If you plan to submit your data to the Minor Planet Center, then you should read through the "Guide to Minor Planet Astrometry" on the Minor Planet Center web site:
 
In particular, read item 13 in the Guide, which describes what to do if you don't have an observatory code. You have the option of temporarily using the "roving" observatory code (247), but if you plan to submit data regularly from a telescope at a fixed location, you should follow the Guide instructions for obtaining an observatory.
 
Gerald

---------------
Gerald McKeegan
Chabot Observatory G58
Home: (925)926-0853
Cell: (925)899-3468 (voice only)
Email: geraldspace@...

 



From: astrometrica@groups.io [mailto:astrometrica@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mohammed Fadil Talafha
Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2020 06:59
To: astrometrica@groups.io
Subject: [astrometrica] Astrometrica without observatory code


Dear all 
How i can use astrometrica without observatory code ? Can I add the coordinates. Manually and other parameters or there is other solution?
Thanks all
Facebook Twitter FlickR YouTube
Instagram
     
Mohammed Fadil Talafha
Research Assistant
Sharjah Academy for Astronomy, Space sciences & Technology
E: 
mtalafha@...
T: 
+97165166102  | 
M: 
P.O.Box:  27272 Sharjah, UAE  |  W:  www.saasst.ae
   


Mike Paling
 

Mohammed ....

Was the link that I sent you ( regarding how to get an Observatory Code ) to your personal email address useful for you?

The steps shown in the link are actually quite easy to to follow.

Mike


shurpakov_A98@tut.by
 

I can help with registering the observatory. Respectfully yours, Sergey Shurpakov. (Code A98 and C36)

shurpakov_a98@...

 
Date: 2020-12-02 17:58
Subject: [astrometrica] Astrometrica without observatory code

Dear all 
How i can use astrometrica without observatory code ? Can I add the coordinates. Manually and other parameters or there is other solution?
Thanks all
FacebookTwitterFlickRYouTube
Instagram
   
Mohammed Fadil Talafha
Research Assistant
Sharjah Academy for Astronomy, Space sciences & Technology
E: 
mtalafha@...
T: 
+97165166102 | 
M: 
P.O.Box: 27272 Sharjah, UAE | W: www.saasst.ae
  


Cicero Lopes Silva
 

For calculations using Astrometrica I have successfully used COD XXX.
It should only be used for internal use and not for sending data.
It may be important that you read this doc:

https://projectpluto.com/find_orb.htm
"

What do you do if you don't have an observatory code?

I will first note that the MPC provides instructions on how to get your own observatory code. However, you may not want to wait. (Even if you're willing, it can take a long time for the code to come through.) Or you may just have a few observations made from some oddball location. Find_Orb provides three different ways of handling this problem (aside from the fourth method, that of getting the MPC to issue you an observatory code).

• You can use the "roving observer" extensions provided by MPC. Essentially, your observations all have code (247), and each line of astrometric data is accompanied by another line giving your lat/lon and altitude. This is a somewhat awkward way of doing things, but it does work.

• As mentioned at the above 'how to get your own observatory code' link, you can specify COD XXX in your observation header, and use code (XXX) for all your observations. You then provide another 'comment' line in the observation header that gives your latitude/longitude. This is probably the simplest method, but does assume that you have only one location to add. The resulting header might look a bit like

COD XXX
COM Long. 239 18 45 E, Lat. 33 54 11 N, Alt. 100m, Google Earth

...along with the usual TEL, OBS, MEA, NET, etc. header lines. The above would be for an observer at longitude 120° 41' 15" West; the MPC allows only East longitudes, in degrees/minutes/seconds. (The coordinates are for a point off the coast from San Diego, California. There isn't an observatory there, unless you take a boat and a telescope out there.)

Find_Orb is considerably less picky. The longitudes can be east or west, and you can pick any three-character abbreviation you want. So the following...

COD C-2
COM Long. 131 41 59.26 W, Lat. 53 58 08.7 N, Alt. 5896m, from a dream
COD Q2v
COM Long. 27 18 28 W, Lat. 14 14 21.3571 S, Alt. 42m, rough guess

...would cause any subsequent observations from C-2 and Q2v within that file to be assumed to be from those lat/lon. Also, with Find_Orb, the latitudes and longitudes can be in decimal degrees with zero minutes and seconds, or degrees and decimal minutes and zero seconds; i.e., the following lines would all describe the same point :

COM Long. 31 10 36.0 W, Lat. 53 17 45 N, Alt. 17m, from sextant obs
COM Long. 31 10.6 0 W, Lat. 53 17.75 0 N, Alt. 17m, from sextant obs
COM Long. 31.11 0 0 W, Lat. 53.2958333 0 0 N, Alt. 17m, from sextant obs

You can even use these if you think an existing MPC code is incorrectly placed; lines such as the above will override the usual sources of MPC station locations. But this is for Find_Orb's use only; if submitting to MPC, you will have to stick to COD XXX, east longitudes, and degrees/minutes/seconds, and no excuses.

Once Find_Orb has loaded astrometry with such headers, you can generate (for example) (Q2v)-centric ephemerides. However, it'll "forget" about those stations when you close the program.

Also Find_Orb-specific: if you use the above, you can specify the observatory name on the COD line, e.g.,

COD Q2v Mid-South Atlantic Ocean Observatory

• The final method is Find_Orb specific. If you edit the text file rovers.txt distributed with Find_Orb, you will see details and examples of how to add your own MPC codes. As you will see, I've used this to add "MPC codes" for several artificial satellite observers, the separate locations of the telescopes on Mauna Kea (MPC lumps them all in one location with one observatory code, which is problematic on some occasions), and the planets, sun, and some natural satellites (including the moon). This is a powerful, easy, and very useful system. It also means that MPC will look at your astrometry and have no idea what's going on. Consider it to be "for internal use only".
"