Scanning negatives


Christine Shepherd,
 

Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


Kirk Lindgren
 

Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


ender100
 

Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson

www.PrecisionDigitalNegatives.com
www.MarkINelsonPhoto.com

Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


ARTHUR CHAKALIS
 

The Epson 3200 photo scanner included two negative holders.  One for 35mm and another that includes both 120 and a 4x5 holder.  It was discontinued in 2004 but still delivers good results.  Finding a used one with the negative holders might be challenging.  

I use a D800 vs a scanner for 35 mm but still scan 120 and 4x5 negatives.  

Respectfully, Art

Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE device

------ Original message------
From: Christine Shepherd,
Date: Fri, Aug 27, 2021 21:32
Cc:
Subject:[altphotolist] Scanning negatives

Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


Matti Koskinen
 

I found a Canon 9950F from a flea market for 50 euros and it scans 4x5 negs and probably with some cardbord hack also 8x10 negs. Works fine with Vuescan on Mac Mojave, but as the driver is 32-bit, not on Catalina. Using VirtualBox and WinXP it sort of works.

-m


On Sat, 28 Aug 2021, 04:32 Christine Shepherd,, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


Tomas Sobota
 

I use a Epson 4990. Great scanner, works with Vuescan and accepts negatives up to 8x10".
I see them second-hand for $100 to $250. I've had mine for some 15 years or more and never a glitch.

However, for 35mm film I use a camera on a bellows and a macro lens. Works faster, the quality is as good as a prosumer grade scanner, and allows different framings and magnifications.
Tom


Dan Waters
 

Christine, if you ran a drum scanner in your previous job, you'll feel right at home with Epson’s V700/50 or V800/850 flatbed scanners, which take an excellent optional fluid mount option that (conveniently) happens to be on sale. I use mine daily and with excellent results. Perfect flatness, great sharpness, no Newton’s rings, scan area 5x9 inches.

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:32 PM, Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:

Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


Peter Marshall
 

I have the  Epson V750 and it is fine for 120 or 4.5 and does a fairly reasonable job on 35mm, though my D810 is a little better for those.

I also have the fluid mount for the V750. I got it free and used it once to test if the results were any better than without for 120 or 4x5. My conclusion was it made so little difference if any and that it wasn't worth the fuss.

I've done several books for friends using scans on their V750 or V800 from 35mm, and one that used a mix of scans on a V750 and on a good film scanner. After I'd prepared the scans for printing at around 9x6" print size you couldn't tell which was which.

Peter

On 28/08/2021 10:38, Dan Waters wrote:
Christine, if you ran a drum scanner in your previous job, you'll feel right at home with Epson’s V700/50 or V800/850 flatbed scanners, which take an excellent optional fluid mount option that (conveniently) happens to be on sale. I use mine daily and with excellent results. Perfect flatness, great sharpness, no Newton’s rings, scan area 5x9 inches.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1086837-REG/epson_b12b818272_fluid_mount.html

Dan




On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:32 PM, Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:

Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


Christine Shepherd,
 

Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine


Jeremy Moore
 

Digitization [plus processing & preservation] is what I used to do for a living and I took a selfish interest in negative scanning 😁.

If you’d like some dry reading, I wrote a peer-reviewed article about a couple of capture stations I built with grant funding to digitize a collection of over 1/2 million historical negatives. It compares the camera-based stations with an Epson flatbed and Nikon film scanner I had been using in my lab based on resolution, speed, and working methods.

The pre-press article submitted for publication is free on TxState’s website, click the “Download” link on this page to get a PDF: 

Spoiler alert! Output from camera stations 📸 beat flatbed scanning hands down in quality & speed BUT a flat-bed scanner is better for many at-home scanning situations due to the increased costs in time, $$$, & potential frustrations with a capture-based system. I sold my personal Imacon scanner after testing, but to keep things in perspective, my Voigtlander macro lens costs more than a legal-sized Epson scanner.

There’s not much maintenance with an Epson flatbed, but using them at the defaults without extensive tweaking usually results in output that falls below expectations. If possible, buy one under a free return policy like offered by Amazon.com or Best Buy, so you can try the process and see what you think.

If you’re still game to try setting up a capture station, I’ve walked quite a few people & institutions through setting up their own, but that is probably a conversation best had off-list.

If you don’t have many negatives or don’t want to do a lot of fiddling, you might outsource this part of the process to a digitization service and spend more time shooting and printing.

Finally, I don’t know if there’s any interest 🤷‍♂️, but my wife & I are currently setting up a system to capture 35mm/120/4x5 negatives after moving households and could digitize batches of film using my methods for a fee. This isn’t something we had planned on, but email us directly at TheArtists@... if you’d like to talk.

Now to continue organizing the new studio space and mix up some Ferric & Potassium Oxalate chemistry because the Everbeam 365nm LED UV light comes tomorrow (thanks for the recommendation on the list, Sandy 😊). Samantha & I want to be ready to do some printing!!

Jeremy@...

On Sun, Aug 29, 2021 at 7:12 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine

--
Sent from a mobile device.


Phil McOrmond
 

Thanks for the informative reference.  I use a D850 for most of my scanning now.

Regards,

Phil

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 5:25 AM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Digitization [plus processing & preservation] is what I used to do for a living and I took a selfish interest in negative scanning 😁.

If you’d like some dry reading, I wrote a peer-reviewed article about a couple of capture stations I built with grant funding to digitize a collection of over 1/2 million historical negatives. It compares the camera-based stations with an Epson flatbed and Nikon film scanner I had been using in my lab based on resolution, speed, and working methods.

The pre-press article submitted for publication is free on TxState’s website, click the “Download” link on this page to get a PDF: 

Spoiler alert! Output from camera stations 📸 beat flatbed scanning hands down in quality & speed BUT a flat-bed scanner is better for many at-home scanning situations due to the increased costs in time, $$$, & potential frustrations with a capture-based system. I sold my personal Imacon scanner after testing, but to keep things in perspective, my Voigtlander macro lens costs more than a legal-sized Epson scanner.

There’s not much maintenance with an Epson flatbed, but using them at the defaults without extensive tweaking usually results in output that falls below expectations. If possible, buy one under a free return policy like offered by Amazon.com or Best Buy, so you can try the process and see what you think.

If you’re still game to try setting up a capture station, I’ve walked quite a few people & institutions through setting up their own, but that is probably a conversation best had off-list.

If you don’t have many negatives or don’t want to do a lot of fiddling, you might outsource this part of the process to a digitization service and spend more time shooting and printing.

Finally, I don’t know if there’s any interest 🤷‍♂️, but my wife & I are currently setting up a system to capture 35mm/120/4x5 negatives after moving households and could digitize batches of film using my methods for a fee. This isn’t something we had planned on, but email us directly at TheArtists@... if you’d like to talk.

Now to continue organizing the new studio space and mix up some Ferric & Potassium Oxalate chemistry because the Everbeam 365nm LED UV light comes tomorrow (thanks for the recommendation on the list, Sandy 😊). Samantha & I want to be ready to do some printing!!

Jeremy@...

On Sun, Aug 29, 2021 at 7:12 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine

--
Sent from a mobile device.


Christine Shepherd,
 

Jeremy!

Thanks for the (surprising) info.

I *do* have an old D50 Nikon 5MP with a basic Nikon macro lens gathering dust in the closet.  Not sure that's enough resolution, though, what do you think?

Downloading your paper shortly... thanks!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958



On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 6:25 AM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Digitization [plus processing & preservation] is what I used to do for a living and I took a selfish interest in negative scanning 😁.

If you’d like some dry reading, I wrote a peer-reviewed article about a couple of capture stations I built with grant funding to digitize a collection of over 1/2 million historical negatives. It compares the camera-based stations with an Epson flatbed and Nikon film scanner I had been using in my lab based on resolution, speed, and working methods.

The pre-press article submitted for publication is free on TxState’s website, click the “Download” link on this page to get a PDF: 

Spoiler alert! Output from camera stations 📸 beat flatbed scanning hands down in quality & speed BUT a flat-bed scanner is better for many at-home scanning situations due to the increased costs in time, $$$, & potential frustrations with a capture-based system. I sold my personal Imacon scanner after testing, but to keep things in perspective, my Voigtlander macro lens costs more than a legal-sized Epson scanner.

There’s not much maintenance with an Epson flatbed, but using them at the defaults without extensive tweaking usually results in output that falls below expectations. If possible, buy one under a free return policy like offered by Amazon.com or Best Buy, so you can try the process and see what you think.

If you’re still game to try setting up a capture station, I’ve walked quite a few people & institutions through setting up their own, but that is probably a conversation best had off-list.

If you don’t have many negatives or don’t want to do a lot of fiddling, you might outsource this part of the process to a digitization service and spend more time shooting and printing.

Finally, I don’t know if there’s any interest 🤷‍♂️, but my wife & I are currently setting up a system to capture 35mm/120/4x5 negatives after moving households and could digitize batches of film using my methods for a fee. This isn’t something we had planned on, but email us directly at TheArtists@... if you’d like to talk.

Now to continue organizing the new studio space and mix up some Ferric & Potassium Oxalate chemistry because the Everbeam 365nm LED UV light comes tomorrow (thanks for the recommendation on the list, Sandy 😊). Samantha & I want to be ready to do some printing!!

Jeremy@...

On Sun, Aug 29, 2021 at 7:12 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine

--
Sent from a mobile device.


Jeremy Moore
 

Christine,

If it’s enough resolution for you, it’s enough! 

Though at that resolution I might suggest getting an aftermarket macro lens for your smartphone assuming it has 8+ megapixels. This provides other potential benefits like easily using voice commands to take the picture hands-free.

The other thing to consider is the resolution of your original negatives; a good loupe is always a great investment!. For example, you don’t need need a super-sharp, flat-field lens to digitize Holga negatives 😉 I guess I’m saying to think of the digitization as part of the artistic process as opposed to running a home preservation lab—if you want to preserve your negatives with current international standards contact me off-list and expect to outsource or invest a significant amount of money. If you weren’t aware, digitization for preservation actually has some very stringent US federal standards, there is an EU standard, and there are ISO standards. 

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 3:28 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Jeremy!

Thanks for the (surprising) info.

I *do* have an old D50 Nikon 5MP with a basic Nikon macro lens gathering dust in the closet.  Not sure that's enough resolution, though, what do you think?

Downloading your paper shortly... thanks!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958



On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 6:25 AM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Digitization [plus processing & preservation] is what I used to do for a living and I took a selfish interest in negative scanning 😁.

If you’d like some dry reading, I wrote a peer-reviewed article about a couple of capture stations I built with grant funding to digitize a collection of over 1/2 million historical negatives. It compares the camera-based stations with an Epson flatbed and Nikon film scanner I had been using in my lab based on resolution, speed, and working methods.

The pre-press article submitted for publication is free on TxState’s website, click the “Download” link on this page to get a PDF: 

Spoiler alert! Output from camera stations 📸 beat flatbed scanning hands down in quality & speed BUT a flat-bed scanner is better for many at-home scanning situations due to the increased costs in time, $$$, & potential frustrations with a capture-based system. I sold my personal Imacon scanner after testing, but to keep things in perspective, my Voigtlander macro lens costs more than a legal-sized Epson scanner.

There’s not much maintenance with an Epson flatbed, but using them at the defaults without extensive tweaking usually results in output that falls below expectations. If possible, buy one under a free return policy like offered by Amazon.com or Best Buy, so you can try the process and see what you think.

If you’re still game to try setting up a capture station, I’ve walked quite a few people & institutions through setting up their own, but that is probably a conversation best had off-list.

If you don’t have many negatives or don’t want to do a lot of fiddling, you might outsource this part of the process to a digitization service and spend more time shooting and printing.

Finally, I don’t know if there’s any interest 🤷‍♂️, but my wife & I are currently setting up a system to capture 35mm/120/4x5 negatives after moving households and could digitize batches of film using my methods for a fee. This isn’t something we had planned on, but email us directly at TheArtists@... if you’d like to talk.

Now to continue organizing the new studio space and mix up some Ferric & Potassium Oxalate chemistry because the Everbeam 365nm LED UV light comes tomorrow (thanks for the recommendation on the list, Sandy 😊). Samantha & I want to be ready to do some printing!!

Jeremy@...

On Sun, Aug 29, 2021 at 7:12 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine

--
Sent from a mobile device.

--
Sent from a mobile device.


Martin Salowey
 

Great article and analysis. What did you use as a light source?

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 4:19 PM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Christine,

If it’s enough resolution for you, it’s enough! 

Though at that resolution I might suggest getting an aftermarket macro lens for your smartphone assuming it has 8+ megapixels. This provides other potential benefits like easily using voice commands to take the picture hands-free.

The other thing to consider is the resolution of your original negatives; a good loupe is always a great investment!. For example, you don’t need need a super-sharp, flat-field lens to digitize Holga negatives 😉 I guess I’m saying to think of the digitization as part of the artistic process as opposed to running a home preservation lab—if you want to preserve your negatives with current international standards contact me off-list and expect to outsource or invest a significant amount of money. If you weren’t aware, digitization for preservation actually has some very stringent US federal standards, there is an EU standard, and there are ISO standards. 

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 3:28 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Jeremy!

Thanks for the (surprising) info.

I *do* have an old D50 Nikon 5MP with a basic Nikon macro lens gathering dust in the closet.  Not sure that's enough resolution, though, what do you think?

Downloading your paper shortly... thanks!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958



On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 6:25 AM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Digitization [plus processing & preservation] is what I used to do for a living and I took a selfish interest in negative scanning 😁.

If you’d like some dry reading, I wrote a peer-reviewed article about a couple of capture stations I built with grant funding to digitize a collection of over 1/2 million historical negatives. It compares the camera-based stations with an Epson flatbed and Nikon film scanner I had been using in my lab based on resolution, speed, and working methods.

The pre-press article submitted for publication is free on TxState’s website, click the “Download” link on this page to get a PDF: 

Spoiler alert! Output from camera stations 📸 beat flatbed scanning hands down in quality & speed BUT a flat-bed scanner is better for many at-home scanning situations due to the increased costs in time, $$$, & potential frustrations with a capture-based system. I sold my personal Imacon scanner after testing, but to keep things in perspective, my Voigtlander macro lens costs more than a legal-sized Epson scanner.

There’s not much maintenance with an Epson flatbed, but using them at the defaults without extensive tweaking usually results in output that falls below expectations. If possible, buy one under a free return policy like offered by Amazon.com or Best Buy, so you can try the process and see what you think.

If you’re still game to try setting up a capture station, I’ve walked quite a few people & institutions through setting up their own, but that is probably a conversation best had off-list.

If you don’t have many negatives or don’t want to do a lot of fiddling, you might outsource this part of the process to a digitization service and spend more time shooting and printing.

Finally, I don’t know if there’s any interest 🤷‍♂️, but my wife & I are currently setting up a system to capture 35mm/120/4x5 negatives after moving households and could digitize batches of film using my methods for a fee. This isn’t something we had planned on, but email us directly at TheArtists@... if you’d like to talk.

Now to continue organizing the new studio space and mix up some Ferric & Potassium Oxalate chemistry because the Everbeam 365nm LED UV light comes tomorrow (thanks for the recommendation on the list, Sandy 😊). Samantha & I want to be ready to do some printing!!

Jeremy@...

On Sun, Aug 29, 2021 at 7:12 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine

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Jeremy Moore
 

Hi Martin,

Here’s a link to the light source I was using at the time: https://www.artograph.com/lightpadpro/


This is a blog showing issues with vibration using a tracing light like the above one: 

The light I would recommend to any institution is a $2k+ Kaiser lightbox, but that’s way outside most home studio budgets so we’ll skip that discussion.

We’re in the midst of setting up a new capture station at home right now so I’m loathe to share what I’m testing until I have direct experience in production. That said, I’m looking at the Elgato Key Light as I know it’s built with some high quality Osram LEDs, but it doesn’t have any physical controls on the light except power and reset. (We use an Elgato Stream deck to control it as I can easily script actions with the setup in Python like auto-cropping and raising/lowering the light levels and/or Kelvin, and capturing exposures, but now we’re getting into the weeds).

The cheapest solution is a flash or strobe into a diffusion chamber, which can be as simple as box of styrofoam 🙂 If you have a diffusion color enlarger with the mixing chamber, it can be put into service as a great light, too! 

Jeremy@...

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 9:14 PM Martin Salowey <martworld1974@...> wrote:
Great article and analysis. What did you use as a light source?

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 4:19 PM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Christine,

If it’s enough resolution for you, it’s enough! 

Though at that resolution I might suggest getting an aftermarket macro lens for your smartphone assuming it has 8+ megapixels. This provides other potential benefits like easily using voice commands to take the picture hands-free.

The other thing to consider is the resolution of your original negatives; a good loupe is always a great investment!. For example, you don’t need need a super-sharp, flat-field lens to digitize Holga negatives 😉 I guess I’m saying to think of the digitization as part of the artistic process as opposed to running a home preservation lab—if you want to preserve your negatives with current international standards contact me off-list and expect to outsource or invest a significant amount of money. If you weren’t aware, digitization for preservation actually has some very stringent US federal standards, there is an EU standard, and there are ISO standards. 

On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 3:28 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Jeremy!

Thanks for the (surprising) info.

I *do* have an old D50 Nikon 5MP with a basic Nikon macro lens gathering dust in the closet.  Not sure that's enough resolution, though, what do you think?

Downloading your paper shortly... thanks!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958



On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 6:25 AM Jeremy Moore <alt.photosbyjeremy@...> wrote:
Digitization [plus processing & preservation] is what I used to do for a living and I took a selfish interest in negative scanning 😁.

If you’d like some dry reading, I wrote a peer-reviewed article about a couple of capture stations I built with grant funding to digitize a collection of over 1/2 million historical negatives. It compares the camera-based stations with an Epson flatbed and Nikon film scanner I had been using in my lab based on resolution, speed, and working methods.

The pre-press article submitted for publication is free on TxState’s website, click the “Download” link on this page to get a PDF: 

Spoiler alert! Output from camera stations 📸 beat flatbed scanning hands down in quality & speed BUT a flat-bed scanner is better for many at-home scanning situations due to the increased costs in time, $$$, & potential frustrations with a capture-based system. I sold my personal Imacon scanner after testing, but to keep things in perspective, my Voigtlander macro lens costs more than a legal-sized Epson scanner.

There’s not much maintenance with an Epson flatbed, but using them at the defaults without extensive tweaking usually results in output that falls below expectations. If possible, buy one under a free return policy like offered by Amazon.com or Best Buy, so you can try the process and see what you think.

If you’re still game to try setting up a capture station, I’ve walked quite a few people & institutions through setting up their own, but that is probably a conversation best had off-list.

If you don’t have many negatives or don’t want to do a lot of fiddling, you might outsource this part of the process to a digitization service and spend more time shooting and printing.

Finally, I don’t know if there’s any interest 🤷‍♂️, but my wife & I are currently setting up a system to capture 35mm/120/4x5 negatives after moving households and could digitize batches of film using my methods for a fee. This isn’t something we had planned on, but email us directly at TheArtists@... if you’d like to talk.

Now to continue organizing the new studio space and mix up some Ferric & Potassium Oxalate chemistry because the Everbeam 365nm LED UV light comes tomorrow (thanks for the recommendation on the list, Sandy 😊). Samantha & I want to be ready to do some printing!!

Jeremy@...

On Sun, Aug 29, 2021 at 7:12 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Wow, this is an intriguing possibility.  However, I don't have a DSLR.  Not sure about the quality that would result from an iPhone "scanning" 4x5 negatives.  I shall experiment and report back.

Thanks for all your replies!

Christine Shepherd, RHCSA

She/Her/Hers

TSE, OpenShift

Red Hat NA

shepherd@...    IM: fury1958


On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 9:35 PM ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Many people are photographing their negatives instead of scanning them anymore. 

Look it up at YouTube for a few zillion videos on how to set up to do this. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Aug 27, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Kirk Lindgren <klindgren2@...> wrote:


Christine, I use a older Epson V500 series. It can scan 35mm and 120 film. I made a cardboard template that allows me to scan half of the 4x5 , then scan the other half. I stitch the two together in PS. It works fine.

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021, 9:32 PM Christine Shepherd, <epona.fyrefly@...> wrote:
Joseph's recent topic on printing digital negatives got me thinking about a similar topic.

I have piles of 4x5 negatives I'd like to print larger in pt/pd.  What are people's recommendations on how to scan them?  I'm not up on scanning technology these days, but I used to run a drum scanner in a print shop about 20 years ago.  Any make's models to look at, or stay away from?

Thanks!
Christine

--
Sent from a mobile device.

--
Sent from a mobile device.

--
Sent from a mobile device.