Uranotypes


Jim Patterson,
 

Hi Bob in Barbados,
I saw a YouTube of yours about Uranotypes in the past year. I tried my first today. Under exposed and needs some dichromate contrast control. Do you use 10% PD?
Jim


Mike Ware
 

The use of uranium salts as printing photosensitizers goes back to C.J. Burnett of Edinburgh in 1855, when he exhibited images in uranyl ferrocyanide, and in 1857 when he obtained gold images. This is a sub-plot in my book Gold in Photography: see pp. 97-99 for many references to the original literature. Silver, palladium, and platinum images have also been obtained this way.

A couple of my chemistry project students at Manchester looked at photosensitizers employing U(VI) salts in 1985/6 and concluded that uranyl acetate was the best of several possible salts, including the nitrate. We made some nice gold prints this way. You may find it worthwhile trying the acetate for your Uranotypes.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


BOB KISS
 

DEAR MIKE,

            Uranyl Acetate seems to be available at the same supplier from whom I buy my uranyl nitrate.  Pse suggest concentration of sensitizer solution.  IIRC Bob Schramm's recommended concentration for UN is near saturated.  I would be happy to try it.

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB 

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ware
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 7:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

The use of uranium salts as printing photosensitizers goes back to C.J. Burnett of Edinburgh in 1855, when he exhibited images in uranyl ferrocyanide, and in 1857 when he obtained gold images. This is a sub-plot in my book Gold in Photography: see pp. 97-99 for many references to the original literature. Silver, palladium, and platinum images have also been obtained this way.

A couple of my chemistry project students at Manchester looked at photosensitizers employing U(VI) salts in 1985/6 and concluded that uranyl acetate was the best of several possible salts, including the nitrate. We made some nice gold prints this way. You may find it worthwhile trying the acetate for your Uranotypes.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


Jim Patterson,
 

Hi Bob,
Thanks for the info.  I have potassium dichromate powder so I can make any strength.  What is the PVA purpose.  I assume that is polyvinyl alcohol solution.  I have many types of powder including a commercial solution.  Is it medium weight, partially hydrolyzed? And what %w/v?

I am an Occupational Medicine MD so I am aware of the risks.  I added the calculated amount of distilled water to the bottle the UN came in rather than pour out the powder to weigh.  It is stored in a brown glass bottle in a steel container.

I use nitrile gloves, rubber apron, respirator, and safety glasses.  Darkroom has cross flow ventilation.
Jim


On May 30, 2021, at 8:41 AM, BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:



DEAR MIKE,

            Uranyl Acetate seems to be available at the same supplier from whom I buy my uranyl nitrate.  Pse suggest concentration of sensitizer solution.  IIRC Bob Schramm's recommended concentration for UN is near saturated.  I would be happy to try it.

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB 

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ware
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 7:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

The use of uranium salts as printing photosensitizers goes back to C.J. Burnett of Edinburgh in 1855, when he exhibited images in uranyl ferrocyanide, and in 1857 when he obtained gold images. This is a sub-plot in my book Gold in Photography: see pp. 97-99 for many references to the original literature. Silver, palladium, and platinum images have also been obtained this way.

A couple of my chemistry project students at Manchester looked at photosensitizers employing U(VI) salts in 1985/6 and concluded that uranyl acetate was the best of several possible salts, including the nitrate. We made some nice gold prints this way. You may find it worthwhile trying the acetate for your Uranotypes.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


Fausto Saporito,
 

Hello,

 

Uranyl acetate is also available in Poland (warchem.pl), but not uranyl nitrate, so this could be very interesting.

 

Thanks,

Fausto

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: BOB KISS
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 3:40 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

DEAR MIKE,

            Uranyl Acetate seems to be available at the same supplier from whom I buy my uranyl nitrate.  Pse suggest concentration of sensitizer solution.  IIRC Bob Schramm's recommended concentration for UN is near saturated.  I would be happy to try it.

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB 

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ware
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 7:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

The use of uranium salts as printing photosensitizers goes back to C.J. Burnett of Edinburgh in 1855, when he exhibited images in uranyl ferrocyanide, and in 1857 when he obtained gold images. This is a sub-plot in my book Gold in Photography: see pp. 97-99 for many references to the original literature. Silver, palladium, and platinum images have also been obtained this way.

A couple of my chemistry project students at Manchester looked at photosensitizers employing U(VI) salts in 1985/6 and concluded that uranyl acetate was the best of several possible salts, including the nitrate. We made some nice gold prints this way. You may find it worthwhile trying the acetate for your Uranotypes.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk

 


Mike Ware
 

Bob -
Uranyl acetate is said to be ~10% w/v solubility at room temperature. Aim for this, at least, or even 15% if you're warm! Say 7 g in 50 ml. water. 
(A drop or two of acetic acid may help, if it tends to deposit solid basic salt due to hydrolysis.)

You can expect a bright green fluorescence when you put it under the UV! Exposures will be lengthy.
I don't know if you can mix it with your ferricyanide solution, before coating, without it reacting  - it's worth a try. Otherwise develop your Uranotype in ferricyanide as usual.

Mike
P.S. If you have any sodium tetrachloroaurate dihydrate, NaAuCl4.2H2O, dissolve 1 g in 10 ml. Mix this solution 1:1 with your uranyl acetate solution to make a nice gold print - uranochrysotype!
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


brittonie,
 

Hey Mike,

Will the acetic acid help with the nitrate as well as acetate? I’ve had some sedimentation with the uranium nitrate I’ve assumed was the solution being too cold.

Many thanks,

Brittonie

On Sun, 30 May 2021 at 16:17, Mike Ware <mike@...> wrote:

Bob -
Uranyl acetate is said to be ~10% w/v solubility at room temperature. Aim for this, at least, or even 15% if you're warm! Say 7 g in 50 ml. water. 
(A drop or two of acetic acid may help, if it tends to deposit solid basic salt due to hydrolysis.)

You can expect a bright green fluorescence when you put it under the UV! Exposures will be lengthy.
I don't know if you can mix it with your ferricyanide solution, before coating, without it reacting  - it's worth a try. Otherwise develop your Uranotype in ferricyanide as usual.

Mike
P.S. If you have any sodium tetrachloroaurate dihydrate, NaAuCl4.2H2O, dissolve 1 g in 10 ml. Mix this solution 1:1 with your uranyl acetate solution to make a nice gold print - uranochrysotype!
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk

--



BrittonieFletcher.com


brittonie,
 


Mike,

Q2

Will an acetate print flouresce or just the chemistry? I’ve seen the nitrate powder flouresce a bit but the print not at all.

Just wondering that would be an exciting (haha!) addition

Best,

B

On Sun, 30 May 2021 at 16:17, Mike Ware <mike@...> wrote:

Bob -
Uranyl acetate is said to be ~10% w/v solubility at room temperature. Aim for this, at least, or even 15% if you're warm! Say 7 g in 50 ml. water. 
(A drop or two of acetic acid may help, if it tends to deposit solid basic salt due to hydrolysis.)

You can expect a bright green fluorescence when you put it under the UV! Exposures will be lengthy.
I don't know if you can mix it with your ferricyanide solution, before coating, without it reacting  - it's worth a try. Otherwise develop your Uranotype in ferricyanide as usual.

Mike
P.S. If you have any sodium tetrachloroaurate dihydrate, NaAuCl4.2H2O, dissolve 1 g in 10 ml. Mix this solution 1:1 with your uranyl acetate solution to make a nice gold print - uranochrysotype!
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk

--



BrittonieFletcher.com


Mike Ware
 

Brittonie -

Q2
a uranyl acetate print, once made and washed, will almost certainly lose its fluorescence.

Q1
I'm surprised that uranyl nitrate solution - which is very soluble - is depositing solid. I don't think the acetic acid can do any harm, so you could try it.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


BOB KISS
 

DEAR JIM,

            Yes, Poly Vinyl Alcohol.  I found the UN soln, even without the dichromate, VERY "fluid" so it soaked into the paper, even the COT 320.  Those few drops slow down the soaking in so, though it DOES soak in a bit, it stays near enough the surface to be exposed.  No idea about the PVA's specs.  I asked a friend at a local lab and this is what she gave me.

            It sounds like you are taking proper precautions!

                                    CHEERS!

                                                BOB 

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Patterson,
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 10:06 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

Hi Bob,

Thanks for the info.  I have potassium dichromate powder so I can make any strength.  What is the PVA purpose.  I assume that is polyvinyl alcohol solution.  I have many types of powder including a commercial solution.  Is it medium weight, partially hydrolyzed? And what %w/v?

 

I am an Occupational Medicine MD so I am aware of the risks.  I added the calculated amount of distilled water to the bottle the UN came in rather than pour out the powder to weigh.  It is stored in a brown glass bottle in a steel container.

 

I use nitrile gloves, rubber apron, respirator, and safety glasses.  Darkroom has cross flow ventilation.

Jim



On May 30, 2021, at 8:41 AM, BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:



DEAR MIKE,

            Uranyl Acetate seems to be available at the same supplier from whom I buy my uranyl nitrate.  Pse suggest concentration of sensitizer solution.  IIRC Bob Schramm's recommended concentration for UN is near saturated.  I would be happy to try it.

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB  

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ware
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 7:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

The use of uranium salts as printing photosensitizers goes back to C.J. Burnett of Edinburgh in 1855, when he exhibited images in uranyl ferrocyanide, and in 1857 when he obtained gold images. This is a sub-plot in my book Gold in Photography: see pp. 97-99 for many references to the original literature. Silver, palladium, and platinum images have also been obtained this way.

A couple of my chemistry project students at Manchester looked at photosensitizers employing U(VI) salts in 1985/6 and concluded that uranyl acetate was the best of several possible salts, including the nitrate. We made some nice gold prints this way. You may find it worthwhile trying the acetate for your Uranotypes.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


BOB KISS
 

DEAR MIKE,

            Thanks for the info!  It will take some machinations to get the uranyl acetate where I live but I would like to try it.

            Does the uranyl acetate fluoresce any more than uranyl nitrate?   

            The uranochrysotype sounds interesting...any idea of the image color?  Do you have a sample to scan and share?  One of the reasons I love uranotypes is the amazing "old burgundy" color, reminiscent of the color story of Caravaggio's paintings! 

                                    CHEERS!

                                                BOB

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ware
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 11:17 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

Bob -
Uranyl acetate is said to be ~10% w/v solubility at room temperature. Aim for this, at least, or even 15% if you're warm! Say 7 g in 50 ml. water. 
(A drop or two of acetic acid may help, if it tends to deposit solid basic salt due to hydrolysis.)

You can expect a bright green fluorescence when you put it under the UV! Exposures will be lengthy.
I don't know if you can mix it with your ferricyanide solution, before coating, without it reacting  - it's worth a try. Otherwise develop your Uranotype in ferricyanide as usual.

Mike
P.S. If you have any sodium tetrachloroaurate dihydrate, NaAuCl4.2H2O, dissolve 1 g in 10 ml. Mix this solution 1:1 with your uranyl acetate solution to make a nice gold print - uranochrysotype!
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


brittonie,
 

Mike,


Q2- i figured but was obvs hoping otherwise.

Q1- i've been keeping it in many many containers in a very old separate fridge- so when i say cold- i mean cold. totally unnecessary- and when shaken (or stirred) and not refrigerated is no longer an issue - i guess i was just curious if there was anything more about it- i had actually messaged Bob off-list who was really really helpful. 

Cheers,

b


On Sun, May 30, 2021 at 7:13 PM Mike Ware <mike@...> wrote:
Brittonie -

Q2
a uranyl acetate print, once made and washed, will almost certainly lose its fluorescence.

Q1
I'm surprised that uranyl nitrate solution - which is very soluble - is depositing solid. I don't think the acetic acid can do any harm, so you could try it.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk



--



BrittonieFletcher.com


Mike Ware
 

Bob -
In 1985 a 3rd year chemistry undergrad, Miss O. B. Wellesley-Cole, at Manchester did a project for me on "Uranyl carboxylates as photochemical imaging systems".
Her report has this tipped-in specimen, which was contact-printed from a 6x9 cm rollfilm negative of mine, one hour exposure to a small UVA lamp.
She possibly has made the first Uranochrysotype since C.J. Burnett in 1857!
You can see her sensitizer formulation: the molarities convert to 14% uranyl acetate + 10% sodium tetrachloroaurate, mixed 1:1. Very simple. It seemed pretty stable mixed.
The exposed print was stabilised in 5% sodium bisulphite solution, NaHSO3, to prevent highlight fogging, then washed in water. Easy to process.
Allow for colour inaccuracies in my scanning: I'd say the original was a claret or garnet red, 11D8/11E8 in the Methuen Handbook of Colour.
 


The title, BTW, is: "The Pike Pool, Beresford Dale, 1982."
A Derbyshire anglers' paradise!

Mike

P.S.Yes the acetate fluoresces more.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


BOB KISS
 

DEAR MIKE,

            Thanks for even more info! 

            Please confirm that the uranochrysotype is a printing out process and is not developed in potassium ferrocyanide? 

            The print is an interesting color and a little cooler than my uranotypes (e.g. below)  I thought uranotype was an appropriate color for San Giovese grapes at Antinori Vineyards in Chianti.  I call it "Gonaby Wine" because, after they press it, ferment it, put it in casks , then bottle it it's "Gonna Be Wine"!  LOL!!!

                                    THANKS!

                                                BOB

BobKiss1 San Geovese uranotype.jpg

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ware
Sent: Monday, May 31, 2021 7:35 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Uranotypes

 

Bob -
In 1985 a 3rd year chemistry undergrad, Miss O. B. Wellesley-Cole, at Manchester did a project for me on "Uranyl carboxylates as photochemical imaging systems".
Her report has this tipped-in specimen, which was contact-printed from a 6x9 cm rollfilm negative of mine, one hour exposure to a small UVA lamp.
She possibly has made the first Uranochrysotype since C.J. Burnett in 1857!
You can see her sensitizer formulation: the molarities convert to 14% uranyl acetate + 10% sodium tetrachloroaurate, mixed 1:1. Very simple. It seemed pretty stable mixed.
The exposed print was stabilised in 5% sodium bisulphite solution, NaHSO3, to prevent highlight fogging, then washed in water. Easy to process.
Allow for colour inaccuracies in my scanning: I'd say the original was a claret or garnet red, 11D8/11E8 in the Methuen Handbook of Colour.
 


The title, BTW, is: "The Pike Pool, Beresford Dale, 1982."
A Derbyshire anglers' paradise!

Mike

P.S.Yes the acetate fluoresces more.
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


Mike Ware
 

Yes, Bob, uranochrysotype is a printing-out process and the image is solely composed of nanoparticle gold. Not uranyl ferrocyanide as in your 'proper' Uranotype.
The sensitizer and processing were as I stated - No ferri- or ferro-cyanide anywhere.
The colour of that posted image has come out a bit subdued; also the contrast of the negative would have been too low, because it was developed for silver halide enlargement printing, so would have a density range of only ~1.2. The uranochrysotype printing process has a longer exposure scale than that. Maybe it deserves a proper calibration, but it's a lot slower than my usual (iron-based) chrysotype process.
Mike
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


Jim Patterson,
 

Hi All,
If I remember correctly, CJ Burnett coined the term Cuprotype, and used U VI as the light sensitive agent to reduce Cu II to Cu I.  Then Onernetter used Ferric Chloride & Copper Chloride to produce Cuprotypes, and then I updated it to Ferric Ammonium Citrate to produce Cuprotypes.  I guess Burnett’s would be Uranocuprotypes, and the others Ferrocuprotypes.
Jim


On May 31, 2021, at 8:27 AM, Mike Ware <mike@...> wrote:

Yes, Bob, uranochrysotype is a printing-out process and the image is solely composed of nanoparticle gold. Not uranyl ferrocyanide as in your 'proper' Uranotype.
The sensitizer and processing were as I stated - No ferri- or ferro-cyanide anywhere.
The colour of that posted image has come out a bit subdued; also the contrast of the negative would have been too low, because it was developed for silver halide enlargement printing, so would have a density range of only ~1.2. The uranochrysotype printing process has a longer exposure scale than that. Maybe it deserves a proper calibration, but it's a lot slower than my usual (iron-based) chrysotype process.
Mike
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk


Jim Patterson,
 

That should be Obernetter.


On May 31, 2021, at 8:52 AM, Jim Patterson, <jimbobnola@...> wrote:

Hi All,
If I remember correctly, CJ Burnett coined the term Cuprotype, and used U VI as the light sensitive agent to reduce Cu II to Cu I.  Then Onernetter used Ferric Chloride & Copper Chloride to produce Cuprotypes, and then I updated it to Ferric Ammonium Citrate to produce Cuprotypes.  I guess Burnett’s would be Uranocuprotypes, and the others Ferrocuprotypes.
Jim


On May 31, 2021, at 8:27 AM, Mike Ware <mike@...> wrote:

Yes, Bob, uranochrysotype is a printing-out process and the image is solely composed of nanoparticle gold. Not uranyl ferrocyanide as in your 'proper' Uranotype.
The sensitizer and processing were as I stated - No ferri- or ferro-cyanide anywhere.
The colour of that posted image has come out a bit subdued; also the contrast of the negative would have been too low, because it was developed for silver halide enlargement printing, so would have a density range of only ~1.2. The uranochrysotype printing process has a longer exposure scale than that. Maybe it deserves a proper calibration, but it's a lot slower than my usual (iron-based) chrysotype process.
Mike
--
Mike Ware
https://www.mikeware.co.uk