Date   

Re: Aldehyde Stains

Alberto Novo
 

Hi Jim,
is glycine the amino acid (CAS 56-40-6) or the developer (CAS 22818-40-2)? (I suppose the former, but most photographers could think of the latter)

Alberto

Hi All, the photo is an aldehyde stain from 6% gelatin, 2% TiO2 coated on a sheet of watercolor paper as sizing. After dried, cut in half. Both halves soaked in 1% glutaraldehyde x 3 minutes. Left side hung to dry = yellow stain. Right side soaked in ammonium chloride (2 teaspoons) and glycine (1 teaspoon) in a tray of tap water (about 500 ml) for 3 minutes, then washed in tap water and dried. Glyoxal and glut will stain if excess aldehyde to gelatin ratio, or apparently with TiO2 as a catalyst. The ammonium chloride + glycine inactivates the aldehyde to prevent the stain.
Jim






Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

John Brewer
 

I use plate, Bob. 


On 21 Apr 2021, at 4:52 pm, BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:



And which surface do you recommend?  Plate, Vellum or Semi-Smooth Sheet?

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of BOB KISS
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 11:45 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

DEAR MAREK,

            Does the Bristol Strathmore require acidification to remove high pH buffers?

                                    CHEERS!

                                                BOB

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Marek Matusz
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 10:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

I second the use of Bristol Strathmore 500 1 ply. It has been the only paper consistent over years. It is perhaps closest to albumen papers of the past. I had very good results with thicker kozo papers for salted paper. I see no reason they should not work for albumen. 

Marek



On Apr 21, 2021, at 1:23 AM, Jo Cripps <studio@...> wrote:

Hi Frank another lovely paper is Bergger Cot 160 - I have used this for testing and it works well.  

cheers Jo


Aldehyde Stains

Jim Patterson,
 

Hi All, the photo is an aldehyde stain from 6% gelatin, 2% TiO2 coated on a sheet of watercolor paper as sizing. After dried, cut in half. Both halves soaked in 1% glutaraldehyde x 3 minutes. Left side hung to dry = yellow stain. Right side soaked in ammonium chloride (2 teaspoons) and glycine (1 teaspoon) in a tray of tap water (about 500 ml) for 3 minutes, then washed in tap water and dried. Glyoxal and glut will stain if excess aldehyde to gelatin ratio, or apparently with TiO2 as a catalyst. The ammonium chloride + glycine inactivates the aldehyde to prevent the stain.
Jim


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

Marek Matusz
 

No treatment of any kind is needed for salt prints or albumen. 1 ply can be difficult to find and I have used both plate and vellum. Plate is very smooth but after wet processing or coating looses the smooth texture and becomes more like vellum. 
Marek



On Apr 21, 2021, at 10:52 AM, BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:



And which surface do you recommend?  Plate, Vellum or Semi-Smooth Sheet?

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of BOB KISS
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 11:45 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

DEAR MAREK,

            Does the Bristol Strathmore require acidification to remove high pH buffers?

                                    CHEERS!

                                                BOB

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Marek Matusz
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 10:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

I second the use of Bristol Strathmore 500 1 ply. It has been the only paper consistent over years. It is perhaps closest to albumen papers of the past. I had very good results with thicker kozo papers for salted paper. I see no reason they should not work for albumen. 

Marek



On Apr 21, 2021, at 1:23 AM, Jo Cripps <studio@...> wrote:

Hi Frank another lovely paper is Bergger Cot 160 - I have used this for testing and it works well.  

cheers Jo


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

BOB KISS
 

And which surface do you recommend?  Plate, Vellum or Semi-Smooth Sheet?

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of BOB KISS
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 11:45 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

DEAR MAREK,

            Does the Bristol Strathmore require acidification to remove high pH buffers?

                                    CHEERS!

                                                BOB

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Marek Matusz
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 10:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

I second the use of Bristol Strathmore 500 1 ply. It has been the only paper consistent over years. It is perhaps closest to albumen papers of the past. I had very good results with thicker kozo papers for salted paper. I see no reason they should not work for albumen. 

Marek



On Apr 21, 2021, at 1:23 AM, Jo Cripps <studio@...> wrote:

Hi Frank another lovely paper is Bergger Cot 160 - I have used this for testing and it works well.  

cheers Jo


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

BOB KISS
 

DEAR MAREK,

            Does the Bristol Strathmore require acidification to remove high pH buffers?

                                    CHEERS!

                                                BOB

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of Marek Matusz
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 10:37 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

 

I second the use of Bristol Strathmore 500 1 ply. It has been the only paper consistent over years. It is perhaps closest to albumen papers of the past. I had very good results with thicker kozo papers for salted paper. I see no reason they should not work for albumen. 

Marek



On Apr 21, 2021, at 1:23 AM, Jo Cripps <studio@...> wrote:

Hi Frank another lovely paper is Bergger Cot 160 - I have used this for testing and it works well.  

cheers Jo


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

Marek Matusz
 

I second the use of Bristol Strathmore 500 1 ply. It has been the only paper consistent over years. It is perhaps closest to albumen papers of the past. I had very good results with thicker kozo papers for salted paper. I see no reason they should not work for albumen. 
Marek


On Apr 21, 2021, at 1:23 AM, Jo Cripps <studio@...> wrote:

Hi Frank another lovely paper is Bergger Cot 160 - I have used this for testing and it works well.  

cheers Jo


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

Jo Cripps
 

Hi Frank another lovely paper is Bergger Cot 160 - I have used this for testing and it works well.  

cheers Jo


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

Frank Gorga
 

John,

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll order a few sheets to try.

I had thoughts about seeing what the effect of sizing the papers I have with arrowroot starch which I happen to have on hand. Maybe I'll have to try albumen as well!

--- Frank


Re: Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

John Brewer
 

Hi Frank

Try single ply Strathmore 500 drawing paper. I've used this for albumen.

Best wishes

John

On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 23:23, Frank Gorga <fgorga@...> wrote:
Hello all,

I am contemplating printing a small book using the salted paper process

I would make digital negatives with two images on a single piece of transparency film and use these to print the folios. I will obvious need to salt the paper twice and add sliver twice,,, once for each side of a folio.

I am searching for an appropriate paper for this project. I generally make books using papers of roughly 125-150 gsm.

Thus far, I have tested three papers Stonehenge Light (135 gsm), Fabriano Tiepolo (130 gsm) and Hahnemuhle Biblio (150 gsm) and none of them have worked very well for salt prints. In all cases, I treat the paper with citric acid and salt, let that dry and then brushed on the silver nitrate. 

Prints on these papers have been coming out very light/low contrast (and sometimes blotchy). I have tried adding Tween 20 when coating the silver without much difference.

Interestingly, I regularly make good salt prints on both Stonehenge Warm (250 gsm) and on the 290 gsm version of Tiepolo using the same methods without trouble.

Thus, can anyone recommend a fairly light paper that works well with salt printing?

And, more generally, if any one attempted such a project before, I would be glad to hear about their experience.

Thanks,

--- Frank Gorga (www.gorga.org/blog)



--
John Brewer
www.thevictorianphotographer.com
www.johnbrewerphotography.com
workshops:equipment sales:chemistry sales
Silver nitrate sales


Paper for Hand-made Book of salt prints

Frank Gorga
 

Hello all,

I am contemplating printing a small book using the salted paper process

I would make digital negatives with two images on a single piece of transparency film and use these to print the folios. I will obvious need to salt the paper twice and add sliver twice,,, once for each side of a folio.

I am searching for an appropriate paper for this project. I generally make books using papers of roughly 125-150 gsm.

Thus far, I have tested three papers Stonehenge Light (135 gsm), Fabriano Tiepolo (130 gsm) and Hahnemuhle Biblio (150 gsm) and none of them have worked very well for salt prints. In all cases, I treat the paper with citric acid and salt, let that dry and then brushed on the silver nitrate. 

Prints on these papers have been coming out very light/low contrast (and sometimes blotchy). I have tried adding Tween 20 when coating the silver without much difference.

Interestingly, I regularly make good salt prints on both Stonehenge Warm (250 gsm) and on the 290 gsm version of Tiepolo using the same methods without trouble.

Thus, can anyone recommend a fairly light paper that works well with salt printing?

And, more generally, if any one attempted such a project before, I would be glad to hear about their experience.

Thanks,

--- Frank Gorga (www.gorga.org/blog)


Re: THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

Jacques Kevers
 

Hi,

Best,
Jacques

Jacques Kevers
Beau Site
Première Avenue 7
B-1330 Rixensart
Belgium
+32 2 653 56 02


Re: fixxons

Jacek Gonsalves
 

Hi all,
I had contacted them in 2018 when they introduced the alternative digital brand film, they told me it was branding and the same exact  film :) Although not sure if things have changed since then. 
I too would be interested if they are in fact the same. As I’m interested in their 36 inch roll which is a huge price difference between product names.

Cheers
Jacek

On Tue, 13 Apr 2021 at 6:43 am, ender100 via groups.io <Ender100=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
My guess is that the film for silkscreen has a slight matte surface which would help evacuate air bubbles in a vacuum frame, help eliminate Newton rings with shiny and possibly sticky surfaces such as silk screen film, Photopolymers, carbon tissue, and perhaps even shine silver gelatin papers. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Apr 12, 2021, at 5:31 PM, Christina Z. Anderson <christinazanderson@...> wrote:

OK I bit the bullet and emailed them after Jennifer said they replied to her. Here is their answer:

Positive Film is meant for Silk Screen Printing, while the Negative Film is meant for Non-Silver printing.
The Negative film coating density is more than the screen printing film.


So I will send Mark a piece of new and usual Fixxons and he might tell us the UV story!
Chris

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:14 AM, ender100 via groups.io <Ender100@...> wrote:

Chris I have a UV densitometer.  Send me a small piece. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:54 AM, Christina Z. Anderson <christinazanderson@...> wrote:

Thanks for this Jennifer. Interesting indeed. 

It seems the description has changed on the “negative” film and maybe they added more coating to accept a greater ink load to justify the price difference. The thickness is the same on both though making me wonder if what you say below is still accurate, which would be depressing if so.

I will buy some but I don’t have a UV meter to read differences between the two though I can certainly print them side by side.

Chris


On Apr 12, 2021, at 7:45 AM, Darkrooms, Department of Art <jmg393@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
This is very interesting. In 2018, when I started using fixxons they had these different materials and I believe they were the same price. I wrote to fixxons to ask the difference and here is their response:
“They are both actually the same material. We have them listed as different names due to the various applications this film is used for.”
Now that there is a price difference, I would hope there is some change to the material. For my work and my student’s work we have been very happy with the screen positive film. If anyone tests the new material, I would be very curious to here if there is some advantage. 
 
All the best, 
Jen
 
Jennifer Gioffre Todd
Advanced Digital Media Services
& Photography Manager
College of Architecture, Art, & Planning
Cornell University
102a Tjaden Hall 
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-882-1020 
 
 



Re: fixxons

ender100
 

My guess is that the film for silkscreen has a slight matte surface which would help evacuate air bubbles in a vacuum frame, help eliminate Newton rings with shiny and possibly sticky surfaces such as silk screen film, Photopolymers, carbon tissue, and perhaps even shine silver gelatin papers. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson

www.PrecisionDigitalNegatives.com
www.MarkINelsonPhoto.com

Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Apr 12, 2021, at 5:31 PM, Christina Z. Anderson <christinazanderson@...> wrote:

OK I bit the bullet and emailed them after Jennifer said they replied to her. Here is their answer:

Positive Film is meant for Silk Screen Printing, while the Negative Film is meant for Non-Silver printing.
The Negative film coating density is more than the screen printing film.


So I will send Mark a piece of new and usual Fixxons and he might tell us the UV story!
Chris

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:14 AM, ender100 via groups.io <Ender100@...> wrote:

Chris I have a UV densitometer.  Send me a small piece. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:54 AM, Christina Z. Anderson <christinazanderson@...> wrote:

Thanks for this Jennifer. Interesting indeed. 

It seems the description has changed on the “negative” film and maybe they added more coating to accept a greater ink load to justify the price difference. The thickness is the same on both though making me wonder if what you say below is still accurate, which would be depressing if so.

I will buy some but I don’t have a UV meter to read differences between the two though I can certainly print them side by side.

Chris


On Apr 12, 2021, at 7:45 AM, Darkrooms, Department of Art <jmg393@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
This is very interesting. In 2018, when I started using fixxons they had these different materials and I believe they were the same price. I wrote to fixxons to ask the difference and here is their response:
“They are both actually the same material. We have them listed as different names due to the various applications this film is used for.”
Now that there is a price difference, I would hope there is some change to the material. For my work and my student’s work we have been very happy with the screen positive film. If anyone tests the new material, I would be very curious to here if there is some advantage. 
 
All the best, 
Jen
 
Jennifer Gioffre Todd
Advanced Digital Media Services
& Photography Manager
College of Architecture, Art, & Planning
Cornell University
102a Tjaden Hall 
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-882-1020 
 
 



Re: fixxons

Christina Z. Anderson
 

OK I bit the bullet and emailed them after Jennifer said they replied to her. Here is their answer:

Positive Film is meant for Silk Screen Printing, while the Negative Film is meant for Non-Silver printing.
The Negative film coating density is more than the screen printing film.


So I will send Mark a piece of new and usual Fixxons and he might tell us the UV story!
Chris

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:14 AM, ender100 via groups.io <Ender100@...> wrote:

Chris I have a UV densitometer.  Send me a small piece. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson


Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:54 AM, Christina Z. Anderson <christinazanderson@...> wrote:

Thanks for this Jennifer. Interesting indeed. 

It seems the description has changed on the “negative” film and maybe they added more coating to accept a greater ink load to justify the price difference. The thickness is the same on both though making me wonder if what you say below is still accurate, which would be depressing if so.

I will buy some but I don’t have a UV meter to read differences between the two though I can certainly print them side by side.

Chris


On Apr 12, 2021, at 7:45 AM, Darkrooms, Department of Art <jmg393@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
This is very interesting. In 2018, when I started using fixxons they had these different materials and I believe they were the same price. I wrote to fixxons to ask the difference and here is their response:
“They are both actually the same material. We have them listed as different names due to the various applications this film is used for.”
Now that there is a price difference, I would hope there is some change to the material. For my work and my student’s work we have been very happy with the screen positive film. If anyone tests the new material, I would be very curious to here if there is some advantage. 
 
All the best, 
Jen
 
Jennifer Gioffre Todd
Advanced Digital Media Services
& Photography Manager
College of Architecture, Art, & Planning
Cornell University
102a Tjaden Hall 
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-882-1020 
 
 



Re: THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

Pfriedrichsen
 

No Diana, I did not receive one to review and all it left me was a little blue!....hey maybe someone can finish this limerick!

Peter

On Apr 12, 2021, at 2:49 PM, Diana Bloomfield, <dlhbloomfield@...> wrote:


Well, bless your heart, Peter.  You are such the eagle eye!  That typo seems to be online only, on the website, but it is spelled correctly, many multiple times, in the magazine itself.  And-- oops-- I just realized that issue is already sold out, so maybe you never got to actually see it.  

Diana



On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:53 PM Pfriedrichsen <pfriedrichsen@...> wrote:
Wow, his last name is tripping everyone up!  The DTP has it wrong too!


Inside the pages of The Blue Issue are shades of blue in royal, azure, navy, cobalt, cornflower, sky, and slate. This issue is dedicated to photographers who embrace blue as a color, a mood, a movement, and a metaphor. Portfolios by John Duglade, Yojiro Imasaka, Noelle Mason, Timothy Duffy, and Oli Kellet.


Cheers,
Peter

On Apr 11, 2021, at 4:53 PM, Diana Bloomfield, <dlhbloomfield@...> wrote:


It's Dugdale, Bob, and I actually just wrote an article about him (and some of his images-- a self-portrait of his on the front cover) in this most recent issue of Kat Kiernan's Don't Take Pictures.  I was fortunate enough to interview him for that, and what an incredibly generous and forthcoming, interesting man.  We spoke on the phone for close to 3 hours. Definitely a highlight in my year to get to talk to him.  But, anyway, this is mainly to say that this latest DTP issue is called 'The Blue Issue,' and includes works and interviews with others who specialize in cyanotype.  Worth a subscription.  And that's my plug for today. :)

Diana


On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 4:22 PM BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:

Bravo, Dave!  Dugdale!  Or is it Dougdale?  I will Google him!

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of fotodave@...
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:45 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

Found him. John Dugdale!

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io <altphotolist@groups.io> On Behalf Of fotodave@...
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:42 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

Her neighbor, right? He does figurative works in cyanotype? I remember him because I printed a gum print with Prussian blue and black, and in a personal email Judy said my print reminded me of him and so I looked him up. But Stockdale doesn’t ring a bell. I think his last name starts with an S but might not be Stockdale. I seem to remember Judy wrote about him in one of the journals, so you might be able to find some information there. These are all from my memory so I am so sure about the accuracy.

 

Dave

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io <altphotolist@groups.io> On Behalf Of BOB KISS
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 10:49 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

DEAR LIST,

            Does anyone remember the John Stockdale in NYC referred to by Judy Seigel in WJPFP?  I specifically recall that he did a pineapple juice final rinse of his cyanotypes to bump up the color!  The John Stockdale on the Pure Silver list is not the same guy and lives in Australia.  Anyone?

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB

 

<image001.jpg>

 


Re: THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

Diana Bloomfield, <dlhbloomfield@...>
 

Well, bless your heart, Peter.  You are such the eagle eye!  That typo seems to be online only, on the website, but it is spelled correctly, many multiple times, in the magazine itself.  And-- oops-- I just realized that issue is already sold out, so maybe you never got to actually see it.  

Diana



On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:53 PM Pfriedrichsen <pfriedrichsen@...> wrote:
Wow, his last name is tripping everyone up!  The DTP has it wrong too!


Inside the pages of The Blue Issue are shades of blue in royal, azure, navy, cobalt, cornflower, sky, and slate. This issue is dedicated to photographers who embrace blue as a color, a mood, a movement, and a metaphor. Portfolios by John Duglade, Yojiro Imasaka, Noelle Mason, Timothy Duffy, and Oli Kellet.


Cheers,
Peter

On Apr 11, 2021, at 4:53 PM, Diana Bloomfield, <dlhbloomfield@...> wrote:


It's Dugdale, Bob, and I actually just wrote an article about him (and some of his images-- a self-portrait of his on the front cover) in this most recent issue of Kat Kiernan's Don't Take Pictures.  I was fortunate enough to interview him for that, and what an incredibly generous and forthcoming, interesting man.  We spoke on the phone for close to 3 hours. Definitely a highlight in my year to get to talk to him.  But, anyway, this is mainly to say that this latest DTP issue is called 'The Blue Issue,' and includes works and interviews with others who specialize in cyanotype.  Worth a subscription.  And that's my plug for today. :)

Diana


On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 4:22 PM BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:

Bravo, Dave!  Dugdale!  Or is it Dougdale?  I will Google him!

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of fotodave@...
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:45 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

Found him. John Dugdale!

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io <altphotolist@groups.io> On Behalf Of fotodave@...
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:42 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

Her neighbor, right? He does figurative works in cyanotype? I remember him because I printed a gum print with Prussian blue and black, and in a personal email Judy said my print reminded me of him and so I looked him up. But Stockdale doesn’t ring a bell. I think his last name starts with an S but might not be Stockdale. I seem to remember Judy wrote about him in one of the journals, so you might be able to find some information there. These are all from my memory so I am so sure about the accuracy.

 

Dave

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io <altphotolist@groups.io> On Behalf Of BOB KISS
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 10:49 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

DEAR LIST,

            Does anyone remember the John Stockdale in NYC referred to by Judy Seigel in WJPFP?  I specifically recall that he did a pineapple juice final rinse of his cyanotypes to bump up the color!  The John Stockdale on the Pure Silver list is not the same guy and lives in Australia.  Anyone?

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB

 

<image001.jpg>

 


Re: THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

Pfriedrichsen
 

Wow, his last name is tripping everyone up!  The DTP has it wrong too!


Inside the pages of The Blue Issue are shades of blue in royal, azure, navy, cobalt, cornflower, sky, and slate. This issue is dedicated to photographers who embrace blue as a color, a mood, a movement, and a metaphor. Portfolios by John Duglade, Yojiro Imasaka, Noelle Mason, Timothy Duffy, and Oli Kellet.


Cheers,
Peter

On Apr 11, 2021, at 4:53 PM, Diana Bloomfield, <dlhbloomfield@...> wrote:


It's Dugdale, Bob, and I actually just wrote an article about him (and some of his images-- a self-portrait of his on the front cover) in this most recent issue of Kat Kiernan's Don't Take Pictures.  I was fortunate enough to interview him for that, and what an incredibly generous and forthcoming, interesting man.  We spoke on the phone for close to 3 hours. Definitely a highlight in my year to get to talk to him.  But, anyway, this is mainly to say that this latest DTP issue is called 'The Blue Issue,' and includes works and interviews with others who specialize in cyanotype.  Worth a subscription.  And that's my plug for today. :)

Diana


On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 4:22 PM BOB KISS <bobkiss@...> wrote:

Bravo, Dave!  Dugdale!  Or is it Dougdale?  I will Google him!

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io [mailto:altphotolist@groups.io] On Behalf Of fotodave@...
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:45 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

Found him. John Dugdale!

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io <altphotolist@groups.io> On Behalf Of fotodave@...
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:42 PM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: Re: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

Her neighbor, right? He does figurative works in cyanotype? I remember him because I printed a gum print with Prussian blue and black, and in a personal email Judy said my print reminded me of him and so I looked him up. But Stockdale doesn’t ring a bell. I think his last name starts with an S but might not be Stockdale. I seem to remember Judy wrote about him in one of the journals, so you might be able to find some information there. These are all from my memory so I am so sure about the accuracy.

 

Dave

 

From: altphotolist@groups.io <altphotolist@groups.io> On Behalf Of BOB KISS
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 10:49 AM
To: altphotolist@groups.io
Subject: [altphotolist] THE OTHER JOHN STOCKDALE

 

DEAR LIST,

            Does anyone remember the John Stockdale in NYC referred to by Judy Seigel in WJPFP?  I specifically recall that he did a pineapple juice final rinse of his cyanotypes to bump up the color!  The John Stockdale on the Pure Silver list is not the same guy and lives in Australia.  Anyone?

                                                CHEERS!

                                                            BOB

 

<image001.jpg>

 


Re: fixxons

ender100
 

Chris I have a UV densitometer.  Send me a small piece. 

Best Wishes,
Mark Nelson

www.PrecisionDigitalNegatives.com
www.MarkINelsonPhoto.com

Curve Calculator III for the Mac is Now Available

sent from my iPhonetypeDeviceThingy

On Apr 12, 2021, at 8:54 AM, Christina Z. Anderson <christinazanderson@...> wrote:

Thanks for this Jennifer. Interesting indeed. 

It seems the description has changed on the “negative” film and maybe they added more coating to accept a greater ink load to justify the price difference. The thickness is the same on both though making me wonder if what you say below is still accurate, which would be depressing if so.

I will buy some but I don’t have a UV meter to read differences between the two though I can certainly print them side by side.

Chris


On Apr 12, 2021, at 7:45 AM, Darkrooms, Department of Art <jmg393@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
This is very interesting. In 2018, when I started using fixxons they had these different materials and I believe they were the same price. I wrote to fixxons to ask the difference and here is their response:
“They are both actually the same material. We have them listed as different names due to the various applications this film is used for.”
Now that there is a price difference, I would hope there is some change to the material. For my work and my student’s work we have been very happy with the screen positive film. If anyone tests the new material, I would be very curious to here if there is some advantage. 
 
All the best, 
Jen
 
Jennifer Gioffre Todd
Advanced Digital Media Services
& Photography Manager
College of Architecture, Art, & Planning
Cornell University
102a Tjaden Hall 
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-882-1020 
 
 


Re: fixxons

Christina Z. Anderson
 

Thanks for this Jennifer. Interesting indeed. 

It seems the description has changed on the “negative” film and maybe they added more coating to accept a greater ink load to justify the price difference. The thickness is the same on both though making me wonder if what you say below is still accurate, which would be depressing if so.

I will buy some but I don’t have a UV meter to read differences between the two though I can certainly print them side by side.

Chris


On Apr 12, 2021, at 7:45 AM, Darkrooms, Department of Art <jmg393@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
This is very interesting. In 2018, when I started using fixxons they had these different materials and I believe they were the same price. I wrote to fixxons to ask the difference and here is their response:
“They are both actually the same material. We have them listed as different names due to the various applications this film is used for.”
Now that there is a price difference, I would hope there is some change to the material. For my work and my student’s work we have been very happy with the screen positive film. If anyone tests the new material, I would be very curious to here if there is some advantage. 
 
All the best, 
Jen
 
Jennifer Gioffre Todd
Advanced Digital Media Services
& Photography Manager
College of Architecture, Art, & Planning
Cornell University
102a Tjaden Hall 
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-882-1020 
 
 

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