Topics

Uni-directional Microphones

Steve Jacobson
 

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

tim cumings
 

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.

On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson



Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson





Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73

Hamit Campos
 

A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73


tim cumings
 

I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.

On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.  If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73




Kelly Pierce
 

I use a dynamic microphone because I figure it is easier to choose one
rather than have many different kinds. My gear is going to be slung
around my neck and shoulders and travel on a city bus or train so I
can’t carry a lot of stuff, like people who drive. It is best to avoid
recording from a distance if you want a quality recording. If the
speaker will be on a public address system, work to get connected to
the sound board and record directly from there. When that is not
possible, I put my microphone right in front of the audio output box
and record the speaker output.

If the person is not using audio amplification, I have a tripod
microphone stand with an extendable boom. I have both 25 foot and 50
foot microphone cords. I can sit far away from the speaker and record
everything. I have been known to wear big over the ear headphones and
follow the speaker with my microphone stand when he walks away
slightly. I am told it looks a little weird in the room, but I am
after a good recording.

Kelly


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On 9/23/19, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will
give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise.
Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If
you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I
know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73







tim cumings
 

Kelly i think you have he right approach.

On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:48 PM, Kelly Pierce <kellytalk@...> wrote:

I use a dynamic microphone because I figure it is easier to choose one
rather than have many different kinds. My gear is going to be slung
around my neck and shoulders and travel on a city bus or train so I
can’t carry a lot of stuff, like people who drive. It is best to avoid
recording from a distance if you want a quality recording. If the
speaker will be on a public address system, work to get connected to
the sound board and record directly from there. When that is not
possible, I put my microphone right in front of the audio output box
and record the speaker output.

If the person is not using audio amplification, I have a tripod
microphone stand with an extendable boom. I have both 25 foot and 50
foot microphone cords. I can sit far away from the speaker and record
everything. I have been known to wear big over the ear headphones and
follow the speaker with my microphone stand when he walks away
slightly. I am told it looks a little weird in the room, but I am
after a good recording.

Kelly


<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">
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alt="" width="46" height="29" style="width: 46px; height: 29px;"
/></a></td>
<td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;
font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a
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height="1"></a></div>

On 9/23/19, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will
give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise.
Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If
you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I
know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73








Hamit Campos
 

What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8 mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.  If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73





frank cuta
 

A true cardioid pattern has maximum rejection out the xlr end of the mic.
However the 57 and 58 and most other stage mics are super cardioid. They
offer more directivity at the cost of screwing up the perfect cardioid
pattern so that the maximum rejection is about 60 degrees from the xlr
connector or at about 5 o'clock and 7 o'clock

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? 
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73










-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.

frank cuta
 

I knew I was going to screw that up.
Its 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock! (smile)

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of frank
cuta
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:33 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


A true cardioid pattern has maximum rejection out the xlr end of the mic.
However the 57 and 58 and most other stage mics are super cardioid. They
offer more directivity at the cost of screwing up the perfect cardioid
pattern so that the maximum rejection is about 60 degrees from the xlr
connector or at about 5 o'clock and 7 o'clock

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? 
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73










-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.






-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.

frank cuta
 

Of course they do hear equally from the front and back but usually they are
what is called a "side addressed" mic in that the xlr connector sticks out
of the top or bottom and technically they pick up equally from both sides.
It is not generally a best choice except when used with another
directional element to pick up from the front.


Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? 
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73










-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.

Hamit Campos
 

Right yeah like in mid side. Thanks. By the way on this note and maybe we should re-name the thread or start a new 1 have you done true mid side? I don't know if you have heard the H6's mid side ball or if you have an H6 but I am curious as to how true the H6's rendition of mid side is. Because my only experience with mid side is a little clip of rain Neal Ewers recorded with his Sound Devices 744-T and some Shoeps mics. But that was just rain. So nothing panning left ro right like a car going buy or anything.

On 9/24/2019 12:20 AM, frank cuta wrote:
Of course they do hear equally from the front and back but usually they are
what is called a "side addressed" mic in that the xlr connector sticks out
of the top or bottom and technically they pick up equally from both sides.
It is not generally a best choice except when used with another
directional element to pick up from the front.


Frank


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson



Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73







-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.


Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

The question is vague and I am surprised that the author hasn’t offered any clarification. The author Steve dismissed cardioid then wrote:

but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest

I am unsure if the speaker in addition to the first row of the audience is desired. Hence why I said a figure of 8 may be the solution. As the author dismissed cardioid.

Gena


On 24 Sep 2019, at 03:30, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You probably want a pair of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73





Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73

Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

It looks like any other mic. Such mics as the Blue Yeti up to U87 are multiple pattern mics and you just operate a switch. From my understanding a figure of 8 is not a studio microphone. Figure of 8 would be used in meetings and interviewing situations. Which I think is the environment that the original questioner was writing about.

Gena

On 24 Sep 2019, at 04:02, Hamit Campos <hamitcampos@...> wrote:

What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8 mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You probably want a pair of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73






Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73

Steve Jacobson
 

Thank you to all who have responded. Perhaps I should have given more context to my questions. In my mind, the best situation to record a meeting is when one can access the sound system directly as somebody mentioned. Ideally, one would have their own separate microphone to mix with the input from the sound system to pick up questions from the audience. If one can't access the sound system, attaching a small microphone directly to the stand that holds the sound system's microphone has often been a good strategy. However, recent trends can make this kind of arrangement harder to achieve. For one thing, often there is no microphone stand with a main microphone, being replaced by wireless microphones. Sometimes, sound systems are all contained within a single cabinet along with the speaker and it may be brought into the meeting room just before the meeting starts. I have found that sometimes, just placing a microphone on the table at which speakers are sitting can work well, but sometimes that arrangement picks up a good bit of room echo from the sound system itself. In that situation, a cardioide pattern would probably help. I have just been trying to think of other methods that might work as alternatives in difficult situations. Although we would never have considered this years back, picking up the audio from the speaker can be a reasonably good approach with a good microphone and a full range speaker as somebody else suggested. While I am familiar with cardioide patterns, I have never had any experience with a shot gun type of microphone. I understand older designs were fairly long and don't know if there are newer designs that might achieve some success with electronic noise cancelling technologies, which is the reason for my questions. Clearly, if one were to use a shot gun style of microphone, one would have to monitor continuously, as Tim suggests.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of tim cumings
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 9:30 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones

I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will
give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise.
Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If
you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@...> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I
know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73