Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder


Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”, unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll write to the list as I progress with the recorder.


Casey
 

Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.


Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

That's a possability yes.

I've had the recorder for a little over a week now I think it is and there's quite a bit to it which I still have to learn.

I've got the recording/copying procedures pretty much worked out so I now have to see if I can work out how you edit audio tracks, I know there's a way as the manual says so but then again the manual is over 200 pages and takes some patience to go through.

On 27/03/2018 1:51 PM, Casey wrote:
Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?




-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.





--

**********
"A dog is a good thing to have around a house and so is a fence"
**********


George Zaynoun
 

Where can one purchase it from and what is its price?

--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29


Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

They’re very difficult to buy and cost around $1500 US new but very well worth it if you can buy one.

On 27 Mar 2018, at 2:37 pm, George Zaynoun <humorlessgeza@samobile.net> wrote:

Where can one purchase it from and what is its price?

--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29



Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

As a follow-up to my eMail yesterday.

Appointments for me were canceled this morning so that meant I had extra time to play with the Yamaha.

I've now worked outsome of the editing functions mainly how to erase tracks and discs - discs in this context refers to groups of tracks copied or recorded to the unit -.

Tracks and discs can be divided or combined with complete audio feedback so if you use a Minidisc recorder you'll feel right at home using the Yamaha recorder.

The layout of the menu structure is fine however there's a lot in the menu system of this recorder so it does take a little learning.

On 27/03/2018 1:51 PM, Casey wrote:
Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?




-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.





--

**********
"A dog is a good thing to have around a house and so is a fence"
**********


Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Another progress report on the unit.
I’ve managed to work out how the “Time Search” works, you can search (Jump Backwards or forwards in time - by set increments through a track or disc.
To put this in perspective then.
Suppose you recorded a 3 hour radio broadcast and new that each commercial break was around 2 minutes long.
When you heard the start of the commercial break you could use the time search to skip forward 2 minutes to bypass the break.
Suppose you missed the start of a portion of the audio you wanted to hear by say 10 seconds, you could use the time search function to go back in time 10 seconds.
So far I’ve discovered that “Time Search’ will let you jump backwards and forwards in minutes and seconds.
You can either jump by minute or second using the jog-dial or keys on the remote or enter a numeric value on the numeric keypad of the remote.

On 27 Mar 2018, at 1:51 pm, Casey <cwollner@wi.rr.com> wrote:

Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?




-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.







Peter Scanlon
 

Is this unit accessable in a way such as menues that do not cycle around or beeps or synthetic voice.
P.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2018 11:53 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Another progress report on the unit.
I’ve managed to work out how the “Time Search” works, you can search (Jump Backwards or forwards in time - by set increments through a track or disc.
To put this in perspective then.
Suppose you recorded a 3 hour radio broadcast and new that each commercial break was around 2 minutes long.
When you heard the start of the commercial break you could use the time search to skip forward 2 minutes to bypass the break.
Suppose you missed the start of a portion of the audio you wanted to hear by say 10 seconds, you could use the time search function to go back in time 10 seconds.
So far I’ve discovered that “Time Search’ will let you jump backwards and forwards in minutes and seconds.
You can either jump by minute or second using the jog-dial or keys on the remote or enter a numeric value on the numeric keypad of the remote.


On 27 Mar 2018, at 1:51 pm, Casey <cwollner@wi.rr.com> wrote:

Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?




-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.







Hamit Campos
 

Oh that's cool dude.

On 3/28/2018 8:52 PM, Dane Trethowan wrote:
Another progress report on the unit.
I’ve managed to work out how the “Time Search” works, you can search (Jump Backwards or forwards in time - by set increments through a track or disc.
To put this in perspective then.
Suppose you recorded a 3 hour radio broadcast and new that each commercial break was around 2 minutes long.
When you heard the start of the commercial break you could use the time search to skip forward 2 minutes to bypass the break.
Suppose you missed the start of a portion of the audio you wanted to hear by say 10 seconds, you could use the time search function to go back in time 10 seconds.
So far I’ve discovered that “Time Search’ will let you jump backwards and forwards in minutes and seconds.
You can either jump by minute or second using the jog-dial or keys on the remote or enter a numeric value on the numeric keypad of the remote.


On 27 Mar 2018, at 1:51 pm, Casey <cwollner@wi.rr.com> wrote:

Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?




-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.







Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

All I know is that the menus have a starting point which they seem to default to so thus far following the manual has told me pretty much everything I've found in the menu system.

Also the machine has dedicated buttons that take you to dedicated functions depending on what you're doing.

For example, when playing a track if you press the "Mode" button you're taken into the "Play Mode" screen where you can select between Randome Repeat and the aforementioned "Tiome Search" function which is the first option presented so after pressing "Mode" you just press in on the jog-dial or "Enter" on the remote to get into the "Time Search" screen.

On 29/03/2018 12:44 PM, Peter Scanlon wrote:
Is this unit accessable in a way such as menues that do not cycle around or beeps or synthetic voice.
P.


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2018 11:53 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Another progress report on the unit.
I’ve managed to work out how the “Time Search” works, you can search (Jump Backwards or forwards in time - by set increments through a track or disc.
To put this in perspective then.
Suppose you recorded a 3 hour radio broadcast and new that each commercial break was around 2 minutes long.
When you heard the start of the commercial break you could use the time search to skip forward 2 minutes to bypass the break.
Suppose you missed the start of a portion of the audio you wanted to hear by say 10 seconds, you could use the time search function to go back in time 10 seconds.
So far I’ve discovered that “Time Search’ will let you jump backwards and forwards in minutes and seconds.
You can either jump by minute or second using the jog-dial or keys on the remote or enter a numeric value on the numeric keypad of the remote.


On 27 Mar 2018, at 1:51 pm, Casey <cwollner@wi.rr.com> wrote:

Hi when you get sometime and get more in to this hard drive recorder?
Are you thinking of maybe of doing A podcast describing it and show us some of what it can do?




-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 8:34 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Notes on the Yamaha CDR-HD1500 Hard Drive Recorder

Two words spring to mind when using this Hard Drive recorder and they
are flexibility and convenience.
Yamaha have added a CD Drive to this recorder you can copy to and from.
You’ll also find a set of digital and analogue inputs/outputs so yes the
recorder can record digital/analogue from other sources such as a
digital tuner or Cassette player.
The machine can be used as a DAC, connect a digital source to the
digital input and hear the resulting output through the analogue
connection jacks which is often better than the analogue you would hear
on the source itself.
Up until now I’ve used my computer systems to rip CD’S but given how
convenient the hard drive recorder is I don’t think I’ll be bothering
with the computer too much in the future for CD ripping for my personal
CD collection.
Copying a CD to the Hard Drive is as easy as inserting the CD, pressing
the “Copy” button and then pressing the “Play” button to start the CD
copy procedure, copying of a CD to the Hard Drive takes around 10 minutes.
The copy method I described above is the basic copy method and there are
others which are more advanced, you can select the track or tracks you
want copied from your CD for example so I’ll get to trying those methods
out in time.
Each CD copied using the recorder is put into a separate “Group” thus
one group per CD.
You can switch easily between “Group” and “Track” selection by pressing
the jog-dial which toggles between these two modes whilst in playback.
Added to this are the skip forward and back buttons thus you can switch
to “Group” mode and use the buttons to move between tracks in a group.
Editing functions are available to allow the user to put in names for
groups and tracks but I have no need for this as its easy enough for me
to identify the CD’S I’ve copied over by the tracks presented in each group.
You can mark favourite tracks and play them from you “Bookmark List”,
unfortunately the recorder only handles one Bookmark listing.
The recorder can use CDR or CDF-W discs for recording, pity the recorder
won’t handle CD-RAM discs as the Panasonic equipment does.
The recorder has a Headphone amp however the amp has problems as it
compresses the output sound at louder volumes.
Front panel controls are well laid out but I prefer to use the remote
control as the remote contains direct buttons to control more of the
recorders functions directly along with a numeric keypad with letters.
So that’s everything I’ve discovered about the recorder so far, I’ll
write to the list as I progress with the recorder.









--

**********
"A dog is a good thing to have around a house and so is a fence"
**********