Maybe for this group or if not...where


Morey Worthington
 

Evening all.

This is a audio related  question, but has to do with a certain radio station and a  wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il.  and listen to a ceertain powerful all news station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing, usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington


Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

I am guessing it is a Radio Frequency issue. Your wireless headsets transmit at a frequency that either matches or is a harmonic of that frequency of your radio station and the radio is dutifully playing what is transmitted on that frequency.. As they are wireless devices you cannot add chokes or filters to them. You could try ferrite chokes on the radio but I suspect that it is the radio's antenna picking up the headset signal. So you could try a number of things to separate the 2 devices. Use an external antenna for the radio. Put a large amount of metal between the radio and headset creating a Faraday cage so that the headset signal cannot reach the radio's antenna. See if the headsets have an alternative frequency that they use. Or encourage your wife to use a wired set of headphones.
At least to test the hypothesis. If so, and that station is on 780MHZ then you 'll have to look for a different set of wireless headsets that don't use the same frequency that the existing ones do.

HTH

Gena
On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing, usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Steve Jacobson
 

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing, usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Georgina Joyce
 

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band. Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
n 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com <mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing, usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Morey Worthington
 

Thanks for input to  my issue. Will look into your thoughts and see what ahppens.

Thanks again,

Morey


Steve Jacobson
 

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band. Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com <mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing, usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Tom Kaufman
 

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Steve Jacobson
 

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

It wouldn't hurt getting a couple of those ferrite chokes and putting them on the lines. If on a power line put it on the cord as close as possible to the power source. You may have noticed that the more expensive USB cables, audio lease and power supplies will have a ferrite choke on them. I had a buzz with my AllStar MicroHub. I had a ferrite choke that I think was on a Decktalk Express serial cable. So I opened it out and wrapped the cable about 2 turns and closed it back together. Because the thin wire wasn't gripped I didn't think it would work. But it did very well.
Very useful to have some kickingarond. Be careful though, I just brought some and they are not hinged.

Regards,

On 1 Aug 2020, at 18:04, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <mailto:all-audio@groups.io> <all-audio@groups.io <mailto:all-audio@groups.io>> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io <mailto:all-audio@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS













Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Geoff Eden
 

It is back interference from the modern switching power supplies. We used to use Transformers to render different voltages for the radio/television etc., but since the early 90s, we use fancy transistors to chop up the line voltage into little time segments to get lower voltage. The noise we get is from those transistors which generate incredible peaks, valleys, and harmonics. Some of the signal comes back down the plug and wire and some of it is radiated. So it's always a challenge to damp it out. There a good thing, however, or wall warts and laptop power cables would have to be a lot bigger and heavier.

There are things called line chokes which are comprised of a ferrous metal hoop through which you can wind a line cord and it will help to dampen down interference coming back up the power cable. They're not very expensive.

Geoff

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 1:04 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

Have you considered complaining and asking them to supply some filters?

Regards,


On 1 Aug 2020, at 18:04, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS














Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Steve Jacobson
 

Those are good suggestions and I am going to do just that. I am a little suspicious of my DSL modem because there are no chokes on the cord to the AC adapter. It is strange. If I put an AM radio near the heavy ground wire that is connected from the circuit breaker box to the water pipe where it enters the house, I get almost as much noise on AM as I do when I put the radio near the line carrying the DSL signal. That ground wire is nowhere near a phone wire. I have unplugged my DSL modem stopping the internet connection and checked the heavy ground wire and there is very little additional noise then. I thought maybe what I was hearing was other noise on the ground wire, but it is definitely the DSL signal. I have been happy with DSL other than that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 12:57 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello,

It wouldn't hurt getting a couple of those ferrite chokes and putting them on the lines. If on a power line put it on the cord as close as possible to the power source. You may have noticed that the more expensive USB cables, audio lease and power supplies will have a ferrite choke on them. I had a buzz with my AllStar MicroHub. I had a ferrite choke that I think was on a Decktalk Express serial cable. So I opened it out and wrapped the cable about 2 turns and closed it back together. Because the thin wire wasn't gripped I didn't think it would work. But it did very well.
Very useful to have some kickingarond. Be careful though, I just brought some and they are not hinged.

Regards,

On 1 Aug 2020, at 18:04, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <mailto:all-audio@groups.io>
<all-audio@groups.io <mailto:all-audio@groups.io>> On Behalf Of Tom
Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io <mailto:all-audio@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to
help us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I
can do about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create
noise on the AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo,
there's just not a lot I can do about it! I can position that little
antenna that is hooked into my stereo and hold it there with my hand,
thus, it does help with the noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my
hand, then it goes right back to the position where it picks up the
noise, so there's just no real "getting away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Steve Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that
it generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band,
but there are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger
than the general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of
those stronger oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is
all a bunch of guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know
about his system. I might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a
problem with noise and interference on the AM band in my house which
is very hard to track down, so there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina
Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it
interesting that other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the
interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this
happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you
have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is
the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine
might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external
antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine
or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help. If
you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being used,
check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to the
radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet from
the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth trying
as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard
them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to
avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the
coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain
radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all
news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3
wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts
ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there
till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I
have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I
change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving
the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction
on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS













Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Steve Jacobson
 

I am already all filtered up in terms of DSL. For one thing, to try to avoid this very problem, my DSL line is separated from my phone lines at the box outside the house, and the DSL line runs to my modem. However, to play it safe, I did put filters on the phone line to be extra careful. I suspect something strange is happening that I will find eventually, possibly a choke on the right device. Thanks.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 2:01 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello,

Have you considered complaining and asking them to supply some filters?

Regards,


On 1 Aug 2020, at 18:04, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to
help us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I
can do about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create
noise on the AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo,
there's just not a lot I can do about it! I can position that little
antenna that is hooked into my stereo and hold it there with my hand,
thus, it does help with the noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my
hand, then it goes right back to the position where it picks up the
noise, so there's just no real "getting away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Steve Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that
it generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band,
but there are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger
than the general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of
those stronger oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is
all a bunch of guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know
about his system. I might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a
problem with noise and interference on the AM band in my house which
is very hard to track down, so there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina
Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it
interesting that other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the
interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this
happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you
have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is
the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine
might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external
antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine
or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help. If
you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being used,
check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to the
radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet from
the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth trying
as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard
them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to
avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the
coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain
radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all
news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3
wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts
ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there
till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I
have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I
change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving
the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction
on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS














Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

I advised complaining not just because it is likely to be cheaper for you as the end user. But depending upon your contract. Such equipment is the property of those who provide you with the service. They are providing you with a substandard service and they are in breach of their contract with you.

By all means fit chokes yourself if it fixes it then fine. But remember if they call for some reason ensure you remove them otherwise you might be accused of causing the fault or damage to their property.

They are probably not bothered but just be mindful of such potential events. It is certainly worth taking issue with them. Arguing that when you disconnect the problem goes away. They cannot argue with that.

Good luck.

On 2 Aug 2020, at 01:48, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

I am already all filtered up in terms of DSL. For one thing, to try to avoid this very problem, my DSL line is separated from my phone lines at the box outside the house, and the DSL line runs to my modem. However, to play it safe, I did put filters on the phone line to be extra careful. I suspect something strange is happening that I will find eventually, possibly a choke on the right device. Thanks.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 2:01 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello,

Have you considered complaining and asking them to supply some filters?

Regards,


On 1 Aug 2020, at 18:04, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to
help us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I
can do about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create
noise on the AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo,
there's just not a lot I can do about it! I can position that little
antenna that is hooked into my stereo and hold it there with my hand,
thus, it does help with the noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my
hand, then it goes right back to the position where it picks up the
noise, so there's just no real "getting away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Steve Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that
it generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band,
but there are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger
than the general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of
those stronger oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is
all a bunch of guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know
about his system. I might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a
problem with noise and interference on the AM band in my house which
is very hard to track down, so there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina
Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it
interesting that other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the
interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this
happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you
have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is
the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine
might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external
antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine
or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help. If
you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being used,
check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to the
radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet from
the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth trying
as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard
them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to
avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the
coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain
radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all
news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3
wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts
ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there
till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I
have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I
change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving
the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction
on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS














Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS







Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Steve Jacobson
 

Georgina,

Just to be clear, I don't intend on moving their wires. The routing of my DSL line was something they do if requested rather than making it available to all phone jacks. They also put in a higher quality cable to carry the DSL/phone signal and they did that to partly address my problem. I did complain once and had them out again and showed them the problem. Even though I showed interference on a local AM station, they saw some of my equipment and assumed I was being more fussy about AM reception than was reasonable. Your caution regarding moving their wires is a good one and I am careful of that. It probably is a choke problem or something that is not in their system directly.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 8:05 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello,

I advised complaining not just because it is likely to be cheaper for you as the end user. But depending upon your contract. Such equipment is the property of those who provide you with the service. They are providing you with a substandard service and they are in breach of their contract with you.

By all means fit chokes yourself if it fixes it then fine. But remember if they call for some reason ensure you remove them otherwise you might be accused of causing the fault or damage to their property.

They are probably not bothered but just be mindful of such potential events. It is certainly worth taking issue with them. Arguing that when you disconnect the problem goes away. They cannot argue with that.

Good luck.

On 2 Aug 2020, at 01:48, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

I am already all filtered up in terms of DSL. For one thing, to try to avoid this very problem, my DSL line is separated from my phone lines at the box outside the house, and the DSL line runs to my modem. However, to play it safe, I did put filters on the phone line to be extra careful. I suspect something strange is happening that I will find eventually, possibly a choke on the right device. Thanks.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina
Joyce
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 2:01 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello,

Have you considered complaining and asking them to supply some filters?

Regards,


On 1 Aug 2020, at 18:04, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we
have around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to
have to help us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise)
chargers, modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my
AM radio; my stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's
not a lot I can do about that! Problem is that this modem definitely
does create noise on the AM band! So since I can't pick up and move
my stereo, there's just not a lot I can do about it! I can position
that little antenna that is hooked into my stereo and hold it there
with my hand, thus, it does help with the noise! Problem is, as soon
as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to the position where it
picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Steve Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that
it generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band,
but there are oscillations that occur here and there that are
stronger than the general noise. I would guess that on his system,
one of those stronger oscillations happens to hit WBBM.
Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of guesswork on my part and there is
a lot we don't know about his system. I might be totally wrong. I
am struggling with a problem with noise and interference on the AM
band in my house which is very hard to track down, so there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina
Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it
interesting that other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the
interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this
happens if your radio is close to the answering system or that you
have placed the wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is
the case, check to see if the cords running to the answer machine
might be passing close to your radio. Gina is right that an external
antenna probably would correct this, but moving the answering machine
or making sure your headphones are not near the radio should help.
If you keep your headphones in a charger when they are not being
used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run close to
the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different outlet
from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have
heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to
avoid this by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the
coverage of the FM frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain
radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all
news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3
wireless headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts
ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there
till the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I
have tried unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I
change the radio station to another, all is well. I have tried moving
the direction of radio, it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me
direction on where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS














Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS







Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Tom Kaufman
 

Steve and list: Well a time was that I could actually listen to WSM (from
Nashville, Tennessee) on that stereo; but no more as my modem pretty much
wipes that out as the interference is strong toward that end of the AM band!
I examined that loop thing and found that I cannot even find where the other
end of that "chain" thing that it is connected to ends as it goes underneath
of the next shelf of my entertainment system! As I stated in my earlier
message, I can turn that little square loop thing, but as soon as I let go
of it, it'll just flip back to where it was! Besides, I can listen to most
of those far-away stations easily enough on either my Amazon devices or on
the computer these days!
Tom Kaufman!

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 1:04 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the
interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone
company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or
with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along
the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC
lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger
loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it
around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new
DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception
especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really
decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


JM Casey
 

I was never able to pick up far away AM stations in the city .. maybe
sometimes late at night. It works much better out there a ways, such as
where my mum lives. Picking up stations from Chicago at 3 AM in the early
90s, even with all the faintness and hissing noise, was pretty cool.

Now though? I admit I just can use the internet to pick up stations from
*anywhere* and I haven't actually turned on a radio in a long time. AM
transmissions seem to have a potentially long range, but are easily wrecked
by the kind of noise caused by everything around the urban landscape. I can
only imagine how much worse it is now with all the domestic devices in one's
home that emit radio signals.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: August 2, 2020 1:57 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: Well a time was that I could actually listen to WSM (from
Nashville, Tennessee) on that stereo; but no more as my modem pretty much
wipes that out as the interference is strong toward that end of the AM band!
I examined that loop thing and found that I cannot even find where the other
end of that "chain" thing that it is connected to ends as it goes underneath
of the next shelf of my entertainment system! As I stated in my earlier
message, I can turn that little square loop thing, but as soon as I let go
of it, it'll just flip back to where it was! Besides, I can listen to most
of those far-away stations easily enough on either my Amazon devices or on
the computer these days!
Tom Kaufman!

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 1:04 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the
interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone
company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or
with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along
the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC
lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger
loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it
around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new
DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception
especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really
decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference
is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard
them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all
news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts
ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS


Tom Kaufman
 

In my case...especially since last September when I got new satellite dish
equipment, it's especially bad, for there's just no "getting away from the
noise and interference that...even the television set emits!
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of JM Casey
Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2020 5:59 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

I was never able to pick up far away AM stations in the city .. maybe
sometimes late at night. It works much better out there a ways, such as
where my mum lives. Picking up stations from Chicago at 3 AM in the early
90s, even with all the faintness and hissing noise, was pretty cool.

Now though? I admit I just can use the internet to pick up stations from
*anywhere* and I haven't actually turned on a radio in a long time. AM
transmissions seem to have a potentially long range, but are easily wrecked
by the kind of noise caused by everything around the urban landscape. I can
only imagine how much worse it is now with all the domestic devices in one's
home that emit radio signals.



-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: August 2, 2020 1:57 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: Well a time was that I could actually listen to WSM (from
Nashville, Tennessee) on that stereo; but no more as my modem pretty much
wipes that out as the interference is strong toward that end of the AM band!
I examined that loop thing and found that I cannot even find where the other
end of that "chain" thing that it is connected to ends as it goes underneath
of the next shelf of my entertainment system! As I stated in my earlier
message, I can turn that little square loop thing, but as soon as I let go
of it, it'll just flip back to where it was! Besides, I can listen to most
of those far-away stations easily enough on either my Amazon devices or on
the computer these days!
Tom Kaufman!

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 1:04 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Tom,

Agreed completely. I had a sudden increase perhaps a month ago in the
interference I am getting on the AM band from my DSL service. The phone
company must have changed something either with the phone lines outside or
with the DSL settings. While I know there is always DSl interference along
the wires carrying the DSL signal, it is also getting radiated from the AC
lines as well. I can't figure out how it is getting into those circuits.

I have a tuner with one of those little square loops and I made a larger
loop on a piece of cardboard and added a length of cable so I could move it
around more. That really helped me escape some interference until this new
DSL problem started. I still like to look for long distance AM reception
especially during the winter evenings, and this interference really
decreases my ability to do that.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Kaufman
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:36 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Steve and list: It's amazing to think of just how many things we have
around the house that generate noise; things that we "have" to have to help
us function, such as our phones (cordless or otherwise) chargers,
modems...etc.! My cable modem really reeks habic with my AM radio; my
stereo system is back here; so is my modem! So there's not a lot I can do
about that! Problem is that this modem definitely does create noise on the
AM band! So since I can't pick up and move my stereo, there's just not a
lot I can do about it! I can position that little antenna that is hooked
into my stereo and hold it there with my hand, thus, it does help with the
noise! Problem is, as soon as I remove my hand, then it goes right back to
the position where it picks up the noise, so there's just no real "getting
away from it!"
Tom Kaufman

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve
Jacobson
Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2020 12:18 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Georgina,

If I take my cordless phone and put it near an AM radio, I find that it
generates a good bit of digital noise across the entire AM band, but there
are oscillations that occur here and there that are stronger than the
general noise. I would guess that on his system, one of those stronger
oscillations happens to hit WBBM. Unfortunately, it is all a bunch of
guesswork on my part and there is a lot we don't know about his system. I
might be totally wrong. I am struggling with a problem with noise and
interference on the AM band in my house which is very hard to track down, so
there might be something more to this problem as well.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Georgina Joyce
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:08 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Maybe for this group or if not...where

Hello Steve,
URRRRR, shows you how long since I listened and took note of the AM band.
Whoops. At least someone is there to put me right. Found it interesting that
other radio stations perhaps not on AM did not suffer in the same way.

Regards,
On 31 Jul 2020, at 16:55, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com>
wrote:

Since the radio station is 780 KHZ, it is likely that the interference
is
not caused by the frequency used by the phone, but that it is getting
interference from the digital circuits in the phone. Usually this happens
if your radio is close to the answering system or that you have placed the
wireless headphones near your radio. If neither is the case, check to see
if the cords running to the answer machine might be passing close to your
radio. Gina is right that an external antenna probably would correct this,
but moving the answering machine or making sure your headphones are not near
the radio should help. If you keep your headphones in a charger when they
are not being used, check to be sure the cord to the charger does not run
close to the radio. Making sure the radio is plugged into a different
outlet from the answering machine or any headphone chargers might be worth
trying as well. If your radio has a separate square loop antenna, moving
that around can make a big difference as well.

I live in Minnesota but listen to WBBM occasionally, and I have heard
them
announce that they are also on FM on 105.9. You might be able to avoid this
by trying the FM frequency instead. I do not know if the coverage of the FM
frequency reaches you, though, but it might be worth checking.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson

On 31 Jul 2020, at 03:47, Morey Worthington <worthington@wi.rr.com
<mailto:worthington@wi.rr.com>> wrote:

Evening all.

This is a audio related question, but has to do with a certain radio
station and a wireless cell phone.


I live North of Chicago Il. and listen to a ceertain powerful all
news
station on AM (WBBM 780). We have a phone answering system with 3 wireless
headsets.

If If I am listening to the Chicago station and the phone starts
ringing,
usually for the wife, a loud whisteling noise happens and stays there till
the call is finished. This only happens on this one station . I have tried
unplugging radio, the phone system, but no change. If I change the radio
station to another, all is well. I have tried moving the direction of radio,
it is a digital one, with nothing any different.

I am really sorry to ask this group about my issue, but it is audio
related. If not for this group, can someone , maybe, give me direction on
where to turn??

Thanks,

Morey Worthington



Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS






Georgina


Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Allstar: 52178
Locater: IO83PS