Date   

Re: goldwave help

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Interesting, I had to reinstall Goldwave on my Windows Desktop machine.
The manual would open every time I opened Goldwave.
When I typed in my license Key and User ID this stopped happening.

On 20 May 2018, at 3:38 pm, The Wolf <hank.smith966@gmail.com> wrote:

I did



On 5/19/2018 10:31 PM, Dane Trethowan wrote:
Try registering the product?


On 20 May 2018, at 12:30 pm, The Wolf <hank.smith966@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello is there any way to tell goldwave not to open the manual every time I launch it?

it is really anoying.

thanks

Hank


--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y




Re: goldwave help

 

I did

On 5/19/2018 10:31 PM, Dane Trethowan wrote:
Try registering the product?


On 20 May 2018, at 12:30 pm, The Wolf <hank.smith966@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello is there any way to tell goldwave not to open the manual every time I launch it?

it is really anoying.

thanks

Hank


--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


Re: goldwave help

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Try registering the product?

On 20 May 2018, at 12:30 pm, The Wolf <hank.smith966@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello is there any way to tell goldwave not to open the manual every time I launch it?

it is really anoying.

thanks

Hank


--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y




goldwave help

 

Hello is there any way to tell goldwave not to open the manual every time I launch it?

it is really anoying.

thanks

Hank


--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


Re: most accessible way to use RTLSDR

 

Hello thanks for this information I was unaware of this

can I get the name of the kit that you are talking about?

also is there a way you could give me a idea on what you reviewed in the past and local aproaches for sdr?

thanks

Hank

On 5/19/2018 7:16 PM, Dane Trethowan wrote:
Actually I’m setting up one of these now and its quite simple.
You don’t need to do anything much so long as you’re prepared to put in a bit of time to design your receiver so to speak.
Everything is pretty much already done for you if you buy the complete kit to put together.
The kit consists of 2 parts, the SDR radio module itself and the Beagle Board computer - similar to a Raspberry Pi -.
All the programming has been done so all you have to do is to assemble the kit decide on your antenna and location, wire the thing up and set it up using your web browser.
The Kiwi is one of many SDR’S and it may not appeal to everyone.
Some might prefer a more local approach and there are many outlets and reviews of SDR’S to get you started, I’ve featured quite a few before in my writings to this list.


On 20 May 2018, at 11:14 am, The Wolf <hank.smith966@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello

you can try the kiwi sdr
I personally don't run this but people who use kiwi to run the sdrs on linux
if you go to
www.sdr.hu
you can find a list of receivers online to listen to people do use kiwi sdr
if you do get a kiwi sdr set up then you can tune the sdr via the web
it is really confusing and I am not doing a good job on describing
anyways below is the list of kiwi keyboard shortcuts to tune sdr radios via browser
I have been working with the developer on getting them emplimented
his name is john
if any other visually impaired people can right him with any improvements on the keyboard shortcuts feel free and email him
before I forget when he gave me the shortcuts he put them together
in one huge list so you will have to use your screen readers read by word to get the proper shortcuts
also he has been updating the software quite alot so any feedback he could use would help with him getting all the quirks out on the shortcut keys
now on to the good stuff
On 5/11/2018 12:49 AM, jks@kiwisdr.com wrote:
Okay. Let me know if this list if okay:

g = select frequency entry field
j k frequency step down/up, add shift or ctrl/alt for faster
LR-arrow-keys same as “j” and “k” keys

t T scroll frequency memory list
a l u c f i select mode: AM LSB USB CW NBFM IQ
p P passband widen/narrow
z Z zoom in/out, add ctrl/alt for max in/out
< > waterfall page down/up
w W waterfall min dB slider +/- 1 dB, add ctrl/alt for +/- 10 dB
S waterfall auto-scale
s d spectrum on/off toggle, slow device mode
v V m volume less/more, mute
o toggle between option bar "off" and "stats" mode,<br>others selected by related shortcut key
esc close/cancel action
? h toggle this help list
On 5/19/2018 3:57 PM, Aman Singer wrote:
Hi all,


I think this has come up before, but if it did, it was a
while ago and this area changes constantly. What has the general experience
been with the RTLSDR and software for devices like it? Is there a clearly
more accessible and usable software option, either for Windows or Linux, to
get this working smoothly? Is there an option which is hopelessly
inaccessible? I have a Raspberry PI which I'd like to use, but can obviously
install any flavor of Linux on a VM and also have both Windows 7 and 10.

Thanks,

Aman




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


Re: most accessible way to use RTLSDR

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Actually I’m setting up one of these now and its quite simple.
You don’t need to do anything much so long as you’re prepared to put in a bit of time to design your receiver so to speak.
Everything is pretty much already done for you if you buy the complete kit to put together.
The kit consists of 2 parts, the SDR radio module itself and the Beagle Board computer - similar to a Raspberry Pi -.
All the programming has been done so all you have to do is to assemble the kit decide on your antenna and location, wire the thing up and set it up using your web browser.
The Kiwi is one of many SDR’S and it may not appeal to everyone.
Some might prefer a more local approach and there are many outlets and reviews of SDR’S to get you started, I’ve featured quite a few before in my writings to this list.

On 20 May 2018, at 11:14 am, The Wolf <hank.smith966@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello

you can try the kiwi sdr
I personally don't run this but people who use kiwi to run the sdrs on linux
if you go to
www.sdr.hu
you can find a list of receivers online to listen to people do use kiwi sdr
if you do get a kiwi sdr set up then you can tune the sdr via the web
it is really confusing and I am not doing a good job on describing
anyways below is the list of kiwi keyboard shortcuts to tune sdr radios via browser
I have been working with the developer on getting them emplimented
his name is john
if any other visually impaired people can right him with any improvements on the keyboard shortcuts feel free and email him
before I forget when he gave me the shortcuts he put them together
in one huge list so you will have to use your screen readers read by word to get the proper shortcuts
also he has been updating the software quite alot so any feedback he could use would help with him getting all the quirks out on the shortcut keys
now on to the good stuff
On 5/11/2018 12:49 AM, jks@kiwisdr.com wrote:
Okay. Let me know if this list if okay:

g = select frequency entry field
j k frequency step down/up, add shift or ctrl/alt for faster
LR-arrow-keys same as “j” and “k” keys

t T scroll frequency memory list
a l u c f i select mode: AM LSB USB CW NBFM IQ
p P passband widen/narrow
z Z zoom in/out, add ctrl/alt for max in/out
< > waterfall page down/up
w W waterfall min dB slider +/- 1 dB, add ctrl/alt for +/- 10 dB
S waterfall auto-scale
s d spectrum on/off toggle, slow device mode
v V m volume less/more, mute
o toggle between option bar "off" and "stats" mode,<br>others selected by related shortcut key
esc close/cancel action
? h toggle this help list
On 5/19/2018 3:57 PM, Aman Singer wrote:
Hi all,


I think this has come up before, but if it did, it was a
while ago and this area changes constantly. What has the general experience
been with the RTLSDR and software for devices like it? Is there a clearly
more accessible and usable software option, either for Windows or Linux, to
get this working smoothly? Is there an option which is hopelessly
inaccessible? I have a Raspberry PI which I'd like to use, but can obviously
install any flavor of Linux on a VM and also have both Windows 7 and 10.

Thanks,

Aman




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y




Re: most accessible way to use RTLSDR

 

Hello

you can try the kiwi sdr
I personally don't run this but people who use kiwi to run the sdrs on linux
if you go to
www.sdr.hu
you can find a list of receivers online to listen to people do use kiwi sdr
if you do get a kiwi sdr set up then you can tune the sdr via the web
it is really confusing and I am not doing a good job on describing
anyways below is the list of kiwi keyboard shortcuts to tune sdr radios via browser
I have been working with the developer on getting them emplimented
his name is john
if any other visually impaired people can right him with any improvements on the keyboard shortcuts feel free and email him
before I forget when he gave me the shortcuts he put them together
in one huge list so you will have to use your screen readers read by word to get the proper shortcuts
also he has been updating the software quite alot so any feedback he could use would help with him getting all the quirks out on the shortcut keys
now on to the good stuff

On 5/11/2018 12:49 AM, jks@kiwisdr.com wrote:
Okay. Let me know if this list if okay:

g =        select frequency entry field
j k        frequency step down/up, add shift or ctrl/alt for faster
LR-arrow-keys    same as “j” and “k” keys

t T        scroll frequency memory list
a l u c f i    select mode: AM LSB USB CW NBFM IQ
p P        passband widen/narrow
z Z        zoom in/out, add ctrl/alt for max in/out
< >        waterfall page down/up
w W        waterfall min dB slider +/- 1 dB, add ctrl/alt for +/- 10 dB
S        waterfall auto-scale
s d        spectrum on/off toggle, slow device mode
v V m        volume less/more, mute
o        toggle between option bar "off" and "stats" mode,<br>others selected by related shortcut key
esc        close/cancel action
? h        toggle this help list
On 5/19/2018 3:57 PM, Aman Singer wrote:
Hi all,


I think this has come up before, but if it did, it was a
while ago and this area changes constantly. What has the general experience
been with the RTLSDR and software for devices like it? Is there a clearly
more accessible and usable software option, either for Windows or Linux, to
get this working smoothly? Is there an option which is hopelessly
inaccessible? I have a Raspberry PI which I'd like to use, but can obviously
install any flavor of Linux on a VM and also have both Windows 7 and 10.

Thanks,

Aman




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


Re: tagging music

Curtis Delzer
 

mp3 tag.
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA

On Sat, 19 May 2018 08:51:26 -0400
"John Heath via Groups.Io" <gus1888=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I’m looking for tagging program that’s blind friendly; does it exist?


most accessible way to use RTLSDR

Aman Singer
 

Hi all,



I think this has come up before, but if it did, it was a
while ago and this area changes constantly. What has the general experience
been with the RTLSDR and software for devices like it? Is there a clearly
more accessible and usable software option, either for Windows or Linux, to
get this working smoothly? Is there an option which is hopelessly
inaccessible? I have a Raspberry PI which I'd like to use, but can obviously
install any flavor of Linux on a VM and also have both Windows 7 and 10.

Thanks,

Aman


mp3gain question

Michael Amaro
 

Hello Listers,

I am running windows 10 1803 64 bit jaws 2018. I am trying to apply the same volume to a file threw out the entire file it self using mp3gain. Do I apply track gain constant gain or album gain?

Thanks

Michael

skype/email:

Mikeameli@earthlink.net

iPhone email:

mikeameli@iCloud.com

JFK"

What kind of peace do I mean? What kind of peace do we seek? Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. Not the peace of the grave or the security of the slave. I am talking about genuine peace, the kind of peace that makes life on earth worth living, the kind that enables men and nations to grow and to hope and to build a better life for their children--not merely peace for Americans but peace for all men and women--not merely peace in our time but peace for all time"


Re: Intel Nuc

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Ah sorry? I don’t follow.

On 20 May 2018, at 6:32 am, Mary Otten <maryotten@comcast.net> wrote:

How did you get this? Was it an email to you? Are you on their list? Just curious. I wonder if Leo got it.


On 5/19/2018 1:31 PM, Dane Trethowan wrote:
Yep, you could use an Intel Nuc as a VPN and media player without any trouble at all as I can do with mine, I successfully used it yesterday.
You need a VPN Client from a particular VPN company of your choice - I use Witopia given the 24/7 support I’m able to get and accessibility of the client.
If you’re going to use an Intel Nuc for this sort of thing then you certainly don’t need anything too powerful.


On 20 May 2018, at 4:19 am, Hamit Campos <hamitcampos@gmail.com> wrote:

I'm sure you could do the surver thing. But Dain would know better. As for what people do with these little things I've heard of people hooking them to the TV and using them as a Media Center of sorts. Which is pointless now thanks a lot Microsoft. Yeah yeah there's Plex and stuff but I don't know how all that compairs in epicness to Windows Media Center.


On 5/19/2018 2:15 PM, Anders Holmberg wrote:
Hi!
Ok, this might sound like i am going to bash all these machines people seem to have in there houses but i am just curious.
Myself i have a mac mini from 2011 a macbook air which is my daily computer and a very old pc from 2009 which i have linux on.
I have 2 raspberry pie’s which i don’t know what to do with them and 2 ipad minis an Iphone SE and my nokia 8 for daily use.
So i also have a lot of units.
But i am very curious on what you all who have these nuk’s and rasperry pies and other small intresting units do with them?
What can you do in regards to audio and video on these machines.
Can you have for example a raspberry pie 3 as a vpn server so that i can listen through that device to bbc 5 Live which i really want to do.
I guess you can have these things for many tasks but my inspiration is gone right now so i am really wondering i have to have these machines around.
/A

19 maj 2018 kl. 11:56 skrev Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net>:

Thanks for this and I followed up the Gigabyte Brix.
I have two of the Intel Nuc basic versions running at the moment so obviously my third box for want of a better description was going to be something a little more powerful, the Brix and Nuc both offer an Intel I7 that would fit my specifications so now the question is which one to buy?
If anyone’s looking at the basic Nuc and Brix? Well they’re similar but the Nuc does have 2 USB 3.0 ports whereas the Brix has 4 USB 2.0 ports, something to think about.
On the audio side the Intel Nuc has 3 outputs, analogue, SPDIF and HDMI for audio.
I use one of my Intel Nuc machines with JAWS and FS Reader as a dedicated portable DAISLY player.


On 17 May 2018, at 1:34 pm, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

There are many boxes like this and like you, Dane, I think they're excellent. They're particularly good for blind users, running with no screen is simple and they are easy to move and run off a battery if necessary. My favourite are the Gigabyte Brix models, but I have used both the Zotac Zbox and the Intel NUC. All work well.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 6:32 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Intel Nuc

Hi!
For those looking for a box to use as say a media player by the bedside or something to hook up to the entertainment system in the lounge then you might like to take a look at some of Intel’s Nuc offerings.
I’ve built several of these machines here and what amazes me about the Nuc is what you get in the package.
I have one of the basic models in front of me on the desktop now, its around 4 inches square by 3 inches high and yet its dripping with functionality all over it.
Starting on the top lower left hand corner is the power button.
On the front panel are 2 USB 3.0 ports
On the left hand side is a SD card reader And on the back are 2 USB 3.0 ports, input for a power adapter, a HDMI port, headphones/optical digital audio out, VGA Video port and LAN port .
So that’s the connectors and then there’s the built-in stuff like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.
This model is only a Dual Core unit running at 2.6GHZ but fast enough to browse the web, play media files, watch video and so on, I’ve not seen any sluggishness yet in all my tests with the Nuc machines I’ve had and again I’m using the very basic models.
This particular machine I’m using has 8GB of RAM installed and a 500GB to boot though storage wasn’t really an issue given the connectivity of this machine and given I have NAS storage available.
So a nice little piece of kit, the Nuc including parts worked out to well under $500.
I had to purchase the RAM and the Hard drive.
There are stores on eBay who will build the machine up to your particular specifications.












Re: tagging music

John Heath
 

Thanks! Sorry for any inconvenience.

-----Original Message-----
From: Joe Paton via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 4:32 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] tagging music

Hi John,

Probably can't do this till tommorrow, but will do as early as I can.

In the middle of re-configuring a new install of windows 10 on an office
computer.


Joe Paton
telephone: 01702 543624
Mobile: 0 7 9 6 7 3 8 2 9 6 4
web site: http://www.apart.org


Re: Intel Nuc

Mary Otten
 

How did you get this? Was it an email to you? Are you on their list? Just curious. I wonder if Leo got it.

On 5/19/2018 1:31 PM, Dane Trethowan wrote:
Yep, you could use an Intel Nuc as a VPN and media player without any trouble at all as I can do with mine, I successfully used it yesterday.
You need a VPN Client from a particular VPN company of your choice - I use Witopia given the 24/7 support I’m able to get and accessibility of the client.
If you’re going to use an Intel Nuc for this sort of thing then you certainly don’t need anything too powerful.


On 20 May 2018, at 4:19 am, Hamit Campos <hamitcampos@gmail.com> wrote:

I'm sure you could do the surver thing. But Dain would know better. As for what people do with these little things I've heard of people hooking them to the TV and using them as a Media Center of sorts. Which is pointless now thanks a lot Microsoft. Yeah yeah there's Plex and stuff but I don't know how all that compairs in epicness to Windows Media Center.


On 5/19/2018 2:15 PM, Anders Holmberg wrote:
Hi!
Ok, this might sound like i am going to bash all these machines people seem to have in there houses but i am just curious.
Myself i have a mac mini from 2011 a macbook air which is my daily computer and a very old pc from 2009 which i have linux on.
I have 2 raspberry pie’s which i don’t know what to do with them and 2 ipad minis an Iphone SE and my nokia 8 for daily use.
So i also have a lot of units.
But i am very curious on what you all who have these nuk’s and rasperry pies and other small intresting units do with them?
What can you do in regards to audio and video on these machines.
Can you have for example a raspberry pie 3 as a vpn server so that i can listen through that device to bbc 5 Live which i really want to do.
I guess you can have these things for many tasks but my inspiration is gone right now so i am really wondering i have to have these machines around.
/A

19 maj 2018 kl. 11:56 skrev Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net>:

Thanks for this and I followed up the Gigabyte Brix.
I have two of the Intel Nuc basic versions running at the moment so obviously my third box for want of a better description was going to be something a little more powerful, the Brix and Nuc both offer an Intel I7 that would fit my specifications so now the question is which one to buy?
If anyone’s looking at the basic Nuc and Brix? Well they’re similar but the Nuc does have 2 USB 3.0 ports whereas the Brix has 4 USB 2.0 ports, something to think about.
On the audio side the Intel Nuc has 3 outputs, analogue, SPDIF and HDMI for audio.
I use one of my Intel Nuc machines with JAWS and FS Reader as a dedicated portable DAISLY player.


On 17 May 2018, at 1:34 pm, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

There are many boxes like this and like you, Dane, I think they're excellent. They're particularly good for blind users, running with no screen is simple and they are easy to move and run off a battery if necessary. My favourite are the Gigabyte Brix models, but I have used both the Zotac Zbox and the Intel NUC. All work well.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 6:32 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Intel Nuc

Hi!
For those looking for a box to use as say a media player by the bedside or something to hook up to the entertainment system in the lounge then you might like to take a look at some of Intel’s Nuc offerings.
I’ve built several of these machines here and what amazes me about the Nuc is what you get in the package.
I have one of the basic models in front of me on the desktop now, its around 4 inches square by 3 inches high and yet its dripping with functionality all over it.
Starting on the top lower left hand corner is the power button.
On the front panel are 2 USB 3.0 ports
On the left hand side is a SD card reader And on the back are 2 USB 3.0 ports, input for a power adapter, a HDMI port, headphones/optical digital audio out, VGA Video port and LAN port .
So that’s the connectors and then there’s the built-in stuff like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.
This model is only a Dual Core unit running at 2.6GHZ but fast enough to browse the web, play media files, watch video and so on, I’ve not seen any sluggishness yet in all my tests with the Nuc machines I’ve had and again I’m using the very basic models.
This particular machine I’m using has 8GB of RAM installed and a 500GB to boot though storage wasn’t really an issue given the connectivity of this machine and given I have NAS storage available.
So a nice little piece of kit, the Nuc including parts worked out to well under $500.
I had to purchase the RAM and the Hard drive.
There are stores on eBay who will build the machine up to your particular specifications.










Re: tagging music

Joe Paton
 

Hi John,

Probably can't do this till tommorrow, but will do as early as I can.

In the middle of re-configuring a new install of windows 10 on an office
computer.


Joe Paton
telephone: 01702 543624
Mobile: 0 7 9 6 7 3 8 2 9 6 4
web site: http://www.apart.org


Re: Intel Nuc

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Yep, you could use an Intel Nuc as a VPN and media player without any trouble at all as I can do with mine, I successfully used it yesterday.
You need a VPN Client from a particular VPN company of your choice - I use Witopia given the 24/7 support I’m able to get and accessibility of the client.
If you’re going to use an Intel Nuc for this sort of thing then you certainly don’t need anything too powerful.

On 20 May 2018, at 4:19 am, Hamit Campos <hamitcampos@gmail.com> wrote:

I'm sure you could do the surver thing. But Dain would know better. As for what people do with these little things I've heard of people hooking them to the TV and using them as a Media Center of sorts. Which is pointless now thanks a lot Microsoft. Yeah yeah there's Plex and stuff but I don't know how all that compairs in epicness to Windows Media Center.


On 5/19/2018 2:15 PM, Anders Holmberg wrote:
Hi!
Ok, this might sound like i am going to bash all these machines people seem to have in there houses but i am just curious.
Myself i have a mac mini from 2011 a macbook air which is my daily computer and a very old pc from 2009 which i have linux on.
I have 2 raspberry pie’s which i don’t know what to do with them and 2 ipad minis an Iphone SE and my nokia 8 for daily use.
So i also have a lot of units.
But i am very curious on what you all who have these nuk’s and rasperry pies and other small intresting units do with them?
What can you do in regards to audio and video on these machines.
Can you have for example a raspberry pie 3 as a vpn server so that i can listen through that device to bbc 5 Live which i really want to do.
I guess you can have these things for many tasks but my inspiration is gone right now so i am really wondering i have to have these machines around.
/A

19 maj 2018 kl. 11:56 skrev Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net>:

Thanks for this and I followed up the Gigabyte Brix.
I have two of the Intel Nuc basic versions running at the moment so obviously my third box for want of a better description was going to be something a little more powerful, the Brix and Nuc both offer an Intel I7 that would fit my specifications so now the question is which one to buy?
If anyone’s looking at the basic Nuc and Brix? Well they’re similar but the Nuc does have 2 USB 3.0 ports whereas the Brix has 4 USB 2.0 ports, something to think about.
On the audio side the Intel Nuc has 3 outputs, analogue, SPDIF and HDMI for audio.
I use one of my Intel Nuc machines with JAWS and FS Reader as a dedicated portable DAISLY player.


On 17 May 2018, at 1:34 pm, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

There are many boxes like this and like you, Dane, I think they're excellent. They're particularly good for blind users, running with no screen is simple and they are easy to move and run off a battery if necessary. My favourite are the Gigabyte Brix models, but I have used both the Zotac Zbox and the Intel NUC. All work well.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 6:32 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Intel Nuc

Hi!
For those looking for a box to use as say a media player by the bedside or something to hook up to the entertainment system in the lounge then you might like to take a look at some of Intel’s Nuc offerings.
I’ve built several of these machines here and what amazes me about the Nuc is what you get in the package.
I have one of the basic models in front of me on the desktop now, its around 4 inches square by 3 inches high and yet its dripping with functionality all over it.
Starting on the top lower left hand corner is the power button.
On the front panel are 2 USB 3.0 ports
On the left hand side is a SD card reader And on the back are 2 USB 3.0 ports, input for a power adapter, a HDMI port, headphones/optical digital audio out, VGA Video port and LAN port .
So that’s the connectors and then there’s the built-in stuff like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.
This model is only a Dual Core unit running at 2.6GHZ but fast enough to browse the web, play media files, watch video and so on, I’ve not seen any sluggishness yet in all my tests with the Nuc machines I’ve had and again I’m using the very basic models.
This particular machine I’m using has 8GB of RAM installed and a 500GB to boot though storage wasn’t really an issue given the connectivity of this machine and given I have NAS storage available.
So a nice little piece of kit, the Nuc including parts worked out to well under $500.
I had to purchase the RAM and the Hard drive.
There are stores on eBay who will build the machine up to your particular specifications.












Re: Intel Nuc

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

My attitude is a simple one, if you have all those machines around then you may as well use them as best you can though regarding the raspberry Pi given their price - if you’ve had them for a while - then its more than likely that far more powerful Pi’s are available now so say goodbye to the old and buy the new for the same price you paid for the old, around $30 in my case.
Using a Pad for a VPN is a great idea, a dedicated VPN unit away from your main machines so set the Pi to whatever VPN you need and off you go, I have a Pi using XBMC that can do this very thing, I got the whole project in kit form thus came with it some very useful accessories which made using the device more fun, a remote control unit that plugs into one the Pi’s USB ports, this is the transmitter for the supplied infra read remote control, a Wi-Fi dongle for connecting to the Internet etc.
Once the Pi with this XBMC installed software was on the network then it was easy to further enhance the control with the XBMC Media App for your IOS or Android phone.
I have a Raspberry Pi - one of the older Pi’s - controlling my Doorbell system, got the kit from the United Kingdom through eBay.
My doorbell system does several things along with ringing a standard electro mechanical doorbell when the button is pressed.
The most exciting thing about the system as it stands right now is the fingerprint reader installed where the light would normally go behind the button thus the Pi can recognise fingerprints and you can assign labels to each.
Next the Pi can eMail and send you a text SMS, the Pi has Network connectivity to do this.
As well as the electro mechanical doorbell ringing the Pi is able to play MP3 files for you to hear and I’ve mounted a bluetooth speaker just inside the front door to take advantage of this given the latest Pi I upgraded to for this project has Bluetooth so why not take advantage of it.
Depending on how you feel you may need a little help wiring up but you’d be surprised just how simple everything is, plenty of examples of bell tones, plenty of files to edit - scripts - with plenty of examples of how things work etc.
And finally I have a Raspberry Pi here which is a dedicated field recorder.
What are the recording limitations? Well that’s precisely up to the hardware you’re using to record from so the better the attributes of the sound device then the better quality recordings you can make.
The Mac mini is a true champion when it comes to audio as it has both analogue and digital inputs and outputs along with plenty of USB ports to keep you going, I’m assuming your 2011 Mac mini is much the same design as my late 2012 Model.
Audio Hijack on such a machine turns the Mac into a master of audio manipulation.
The latest Sound Forge for Mac is a very nice app now and most of the App is accessible - I say most - so you can go down that route for Audio Editing or use something like the classic Amadeus Pro, Sound Studio etc which for the price demanded are excellent value for money audio tools

On 20 May 2018, at 4:15 am, Anders Holmberg <anders@pipkrokodil.se> wrote:

Hi!
Ok, this might sound like i am going to bash all these machines people seem to have in there houses but i am just curious.
Myself i have a mac mini from 2011 a macbook air which is my daily computer and a very old pc from 2009 which i have linux on.
I have 2 raspberry pie’s which i don’t know what to do with them and 2 ipad minis an Iphone SE and my nokia 8 for daily use.
So i also have a lot of units.
But i am very curious on what you all who have these nuk’s and rasperry pies and other small intresting units do with them?
What can you do in regards to audio and video on these machines.
Can you have for example a raspberry pie 3 as a vpn server so that i can listen through that device to bbc 5 Live which i really want to do.
I guess you can have these things for many tasks but my inspiration is gone right now so i am really wondering i have to have these machines around.
/A

19 maj 2018 kl. 11:56 skrev Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net>:

Thanks for this and I followed up the Gigabyte Brix.
I have two of the Intel Nuc basic versions running at the moment so obviously my third box for want of a better description was going to be something a little more powerful, the Brix and Nuc both offer an Intel I7 that would fit my specifications so now the question is which one to buy?
If anyone’s looking at the basic Nuc and Brix? Well they’re similar but the Nuc does have 2 USB 3.0 ports whereas the Brix has 4 USB 2.0 ports, something to think about.
On the audio side the Intel Nuc has 3 outputs, analogue, SPDIF and HDMI for audio.
I use one of my Intel Nuc machines with JAWS and FS Reader as a dedicated portable DAISLY player.


On 17 May 2018, at 1:34 pm, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

There are many boxes like this and like you, Dane, I think they're excellent. They're particularly good for blind users, running with no screen is simple and they are easy to move and run off a battery if necessary. My favourite are the Gigabyte Brix models, but I have used both the Zotac Zbox and the Intel NUC. All work well.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 6:32 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Intel Nuc

Hi!
For those looking for a box to use as say a media player by the bedside or something to hook up to the entertainment system in the lounge then you might like to take a look at some of Intel’s Nuc offerings.
I’ve built several of these machines here and what amazes me about the Nuc is what you get in the package.
I have one of the basic models in front of me on the desktop now, its around 4 inches square by 3 inches high and yet its dripping with functionality all over it.
Starting on the top lower left hand corner is the power button.
On the front panel are 2 USB 3.0 ports
On the left hand side is a SD card reader And on the back are 2 USB 3.0 ports, input for a power adapter, a HDMI port, headphones/optical digital audio out, VGA Video port and LAN port .
So that’s the connectors and then there’s the built-in stuff like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.
This model is only a Dual Core unit running at 2.6GHZ but fast enough to browse the web, play media files, watch video and so on, I’ve not seen any sluggishness yet in all my tests with the Nuc machines I’ve had and again I’m using the very basic models.
This particular machine I’m using has 8GB of RAM installed and a 500GB to boot though storage wasn’t really an issue given the connectivity of this machine and given I have NAS storage available.
So a nice little piece of kit, the Nuc including parts worked out to well under $500.
I had to purchase the RAM and the Hard drive.
There are stores on eBay who will build the machine up to your particular specifications.












Re: tagging music

John Heath
 

That would be appreciated! And when I get it, perhaps tips on using it. Again thanks!

-----Original Message-----
From: Joe Paton via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 3:39 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] tagging music

Hi,

mp3tag ver 270.

It's accessible, but takes a little getting used to.

good luck
p.s.

If you have trouble locating the program, drop me a note and I'll send
you a DP link.

Joe Paton
telephone: 01702 543624
Mobile: 0 7 9 6 7 3 8 2 9 6 4
web site: http://www.apart.org


Re: tagging music

Joe Paton
 

Hi,

mp3tag ver 270.

It's accessible, but takes a little getting used to.

good luck
p.s.

If you have trouble locating the program, drop me a note and I'll send
you a DP link.

Joe Paton
telephone: 01702 543624
Mobile: 0 7 9 6 7 3 8 2 9 6 4
web site: http://www.apart.org


Re: Intel Nuc

Hamit Campos
 

I'm sure you could do the surver thing. But Dain would know better. As for what people do with these little things I've heard of people hooking them to the TV and using them as a Media Center of sorts. Which is pointless now thanks a lot Microsoft. Yeah yeah there's Plex and stuff but I don't know how all that compairs in epicness to Windows Media Center.

On 5/19/2018 2:15 PM, Anders Holmberg wrote:
Hi!
Ok, this might sound like i am going to bash all these machines people seem to have in there houses but i am just curious.
Myself i have a mac mini from 2011 a macbook air which is my daily computer and a very old pc from 2009 which i have linux on.
I have 2 raspberry pie’s which i don’t know what to do with them and 2 ipad minis an Iphone SE and my nokia 8 for daily use.
So i also have a lot of units.
But i am very curious on what you all who have these nuk’s and rasperry pies and other small intresting units do with them?
What can you do in regards to audio and video on these machines.
Can you have for example a raspberry pie 3 as a vpn server so that i can listen through that device to bbc 5 Live which i really want to do.
I guess you can have these things for many tasks but my inspiration is gone right now so i am really wondering i have to have these machines around.
/A

19 maj 2018 kl. 11:56 skrev Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net>:

Thanks for this and I followed up the Gigabyte Brix.
I have two of the Intel Nuc basic versions running at the moment so obviously my third box for want of a better description was going to be something a little more powerful, the Brix and Nuc both offer an Intel I7 that would fit my specifications so now the question is which one to buy?
If anyone’s looking at the basic Nuc and Brix? Well they’re similar but the Nuc does have 2 USB 3.0 ports whereas the Brix has 4 USB 2.0 ports, something to think about.
On the audio side the Intel Nuc has 3 outputs, analogue, SPDIF and HDMI for audio.
I use one of my Intel Nuc machines with JAWS and FS Reader as a dedicated portable DAISLY player.


On 17 May 2018, at 1:34 pm, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

There are many boxes like this and like you, Dane, I think they're excellent. They're particularly good for blind users, running with no screen is simple and they are easy to move and run off a battery if necessary. My favourite are the Gigabyte Brix models, but I have used both the Zotac Zbox and the Intel NUC. All work well.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 6:32 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Intel Nuc

Hi!
For those looking for a box to use as say a media player by the bedside or something to hook up to the entertainment system in the lounge then you might like to take a look at some of Intel’s Nuc offerings.
I’ve built several of these machines here and what amazes me about the Nuc is what you get in the package.
I have one of the basic models in front of me on the desktop now, its around 4 inches square by 3 inches high and yet its dripping with functionality all over it.
Starting on the top lower left hand corner is the power button.
On the front panel are 2 USB 3.0 ports
On the left hand side is a SD card reader And on the back are 2 USB 3.0 ports, input for a power adapter, a HDMI port, headphones/optical digital audio out, VGA Video port and LAN port .
So that’s the connectors and then there’s the built-in stuff like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.
This model is only a Dual Core unit running at 2.6GHZ but fast enough to browse the web, play media files, watch video and so on, I’ve not seen any sluggishness yet in all my tests with the Nuc machines I’ve had and again I’m using the very basic models.
This particular machine I’m using has 8GB of RAM installed and a 500GB to boot though storage wasn’t really an issue given the connectivity of this machine and given I have NAS storage available.
So a nice little piece of kit, the Nuc including parts worked out to well under $500.
I had to purchase the RAM and the Hard drive.
There are stores on eBay who will build the machine up to your particular specifications.









Re: Intel Nuc

Anders Holmberg
 

Hi!
Ok, this might sound like i am going to bash all these machines people seem to have in there houses but i am just curious.
Myself i have a mac mini from 2011 a macbook air which is my daily computer and a very old pc from 2009 which i have linux on.
I have 2 raspberry pie’s which i don’t know what to do with them and 2 ipad minis an Iphone SE and my nokia 8 for daily use.
So i also have a lot of units.
But i am very curious on what you all who have these nuk’s and rasperry pies and other small intresting units do with them?
What can you do in regards to audio and video on these machines.
Can you have for example a raspberry pie 3 as a vpn server so that i can listen through that device to bbc 5 Live which i really want to do.
I guess you can have these things for many tasks but my inspiration is gone right now so i am really wondering i have to have these machines around.
/A

19 maj 2018 kl. 11:56 skrev Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net>:

Thanks for this and I followed up the Gigabyte Brix.
I have two of the Intel Nuc basic versions running at the moment so obviously my third box for want of a better description was going to be something a little more powerful, the Brix and Nuc both offer an Intel I7 that would fit my specifications so now the question is which one to buy?
If anyone’s looking at the basic Nuc and Brix? Well they’re similar but the Nuc does have 2 USB 3.0 ports whereas the Brix has 4 USB 2.0 ports, something to think about.
On the audio side the Intel Nuc has 3 outputs, analogue, SPDIF and HDMI for audio.
I use one of my Intel Nuc machines with JAWS and FS Reader as a dedicated portable DAISLY player.


On 17 May 2018, at 1:34 pm, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

There are many boxes like this and like you, Dane, I think they're excellent. They're particularly good for blind users, running with no screen is simple and they are easy to move and run off a battery if necessary. My favourite are the Gigabyte Brix models, but I have used both the Zotac Zbox and the Intel NUC. All work well.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dane Trethowan
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 6:32 AM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Intel Nuc

Hi!
For those looking for a box to use as say a media player by the bedside or something to hook up to the entertainment system in the lounge then you might like to take a look at some of Intel’s Nuc offerings.
I’ve built several of these machines here and what amazes me about the Nuc is what you get in the package.
I have one of the basic models in front of me on the desktop now, its around 4 inches square by 3 inches high and yet its dripping with functionality all over it.
Starting on the top lower left hand corner is the power button.
On the front panel are 2 USB 3.0 ports
On the left hand side is a SD card reader And on the back are 2 USB 3.0 ports, input for a power adapter, a HDMI port, headphones/optical digital audio out, VGA Video port and LAN port .
So that’s the connectors and then there’s the built-in stuff like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.
This model is only a Dual Core unit running at 2.6GHZ but fast enough to browse the web, play media files, watch video and so on, I’ve not seen any sluggishness yet in all my tests with the Nuc machines I’ve had and again I’m using the very basic models.
This particular machine I’m using has 8GB of RAM installed and a 500GB to boot though storage wasn’t really an issue given the connectivity of this machine and given I have NAS storage available.
So a nice little piece of kit, the Nuc including parts worked out to well under $500.
I had to purchase the RAM and the Hard drive.
There are stores on eBay who will build the machine up to your particular specifications.









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