Date   

Re: Uni-directional Microphones

frank cuta
 

Of course they do hear equally from the front and back but usually they are
what is called a "side addressed" mic in that the xlr connector sticks out
of the top or bottom and technically they pick up equally from both sides.
It is not generally a best choice except when used with another
directional element to pick up from the front.


Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? 
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73










-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.


Re: Uni-directional Microphones

frank cuta
 

I knew I was going to screw that up.
Its 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock! (smile)

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of frank
cuta
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:33 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


A true cardioid pattern has maximum rejection out the xlr end of the mic.
However the 57 and 58 and most other stage mics are super cardioid. They
offer more directivity at the cost of screwing up the perfect cardioid
pattern so that the maximum rejection is about 60 degrees from the xlr
connector or at about 5 o'clock and 7 o'clock

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? 
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73










-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.






-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.


Re: Uni-directional Microphones

frank cuta
 

A true cardioid pattern has maximum rejection out the xlr end of the mic.
However the 57 and 58 and most other stage mics are super cardioid. They
offer more directivity at the cost of screwing up the perfect cardioid
pattern so that the maximum rejection is about 60 degrees from the xlr
connector or at about 5 o'clock and 7 o'clock

Frank

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io [mailto:all-audio@groups.io] On Behalf Of Hamit
Campos
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 8:03 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Uni-directional Microphones


What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt
and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an
SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard
you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too
clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid
side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my
question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company
made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was
talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if
compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to
that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8
mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add
up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right
in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker
will give the best results but there is going to be some handling
noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. 
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well.
If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? 
I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73










-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4855 / Virus Database: 4793/15883 - Release Date: 08/14/18
Internal Virus Database is out of date.


Re: Uni-directional Microphones

Hamit Campos
 

What's a figure 8 mic look like? I keep hearing they hear from the frunt and back. What's that mean? So hear's what I emagin. Something like an SM58 but as well as hearing you at the front end like the 58 it heard you even if you're talking at the XLR end of it. Sorry if this isn't too clear but again I've not used a true figure 8. Only the H6's little mid side ball. But not a true studio figure 8 capable mic. Well I guess my question might be hard to answer as I guess it depends on what company made the mic and what said mic looks like. Also I ask because I was talking to someone and I said that I figure that the human ear drum if compaired to mics would I suspect be omni patterned. Than in replay to that comment someone figured they'd be figure 8. But again if figure 8 mics work as I suspect from what people say about them that doesn't add up. Because why than do you hear things in front of your head and right in back? Figure 8 would be a strange pattern.

On 9/23/2019 10:30 PM, tim cumings wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.  If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73






Re: Uni-directional Microphones

tim cumings
 

Kelly i think you have he right approach.

On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:48 PM, Kelly Pierce <kellytalk@gmail.com> wrote:

I use a dynamic microphone because I figure it is easier to choose one
rather than have many different kinds. My gear is going to be slung
around my neck and shoulders and travel on a city bus or train so I
can’t carry a lot of stuff, like people who drive. It is best to avoid
recording from a distance if you want a quality recording. If the
speaker will be on a public address system, work to get connected to
the sound board and record directly from there. When that is not
possible, I put my microphone right in front of the audio output box
and record the speaker output.

If the person is not using audio amplification, I have a tripod
microphone stand with an extendable boom. I have both 25 foot and 50
foot microphone cords. I can sit far away from the speaker and record
everything. I have been known to wear big over the ear headphones and
follow the speaker with my microphone stand when he walks away
slightly. I am told it looks a little weird in the room, but I am
after a good recording.

Kelly


<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
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</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"
height="1"></a></div>

On 9/23/19, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will
give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise.
Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If
you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I
know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73









Re: Uni-directional Microphones

Kelly Pierce
 

I use a dynamic microphone because I figure it is easier to choose one
rather than have many different kinds. My gear is going to be slung
around my neck and shoulders and travel on a city bus or train so I
can’t carry a lot of stuff, like people who drive. It is best to avoid
recording from a distance if you want a quality recording. If the
speaker will be on a public address system, work to get connected to
the sound board and record directly from there. When that is not
possible, I put my microphone right in front of the audio output box
and record the speaker output.

If the person is not using audio amplification, I have a tripod
microphone stand with an extendable boom. I have both 25 foot and 50
foot microphone cords. I can sit far away from the speaker and record
everything. I have been known to wear big over the ear headphones and
follow the speaker with my microphone stand when he walks away
slightly. I am told it looks a little weird in the room, but I am
after a good recording.

Kelly


<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">
<tr>
<td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a
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alt="" width="46" height="29" style="width: 46px; height: 29px;"
/></a></td>
<td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;
font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a
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target="_blank" style="color: #4453ea;">www.avast.com</a>
</td>
</tr>
</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"
height="1"></a></div>

On 9/23/19, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:
I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the
audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight
microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so
it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You
probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.


On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be
dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that
means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics
hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will
give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise.
Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns
that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the
money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.
If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you
mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If
you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun
microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on
the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and
forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use
headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson
<steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional
microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I
know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a
speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing
feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better
pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any
thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73








Re: Uni-directional Microphones

tim cumings
 

I would not recommend a figure 8 pattern if you are sitting in the audience and want to record the people on stage. A firugre eight microphone picks up equally from the front and the back of the mic, so it would pick up the audience as well as the people on stage. You probably want a pair  of cardioid or shotgun microphones.

On 9/23/2019 10:13 PM, Hamit Campos wrote:
A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location.  If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience?  I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience.  Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73





Re: Uni-directional Microphones

Hamit Campos
 

A pair of Matched SE-7s should do. I was going to ask if it had to be dynamic or condencer but he says he'll be in the audiance so that means he's pretty far. No not realy but I'm not sure how far dynamics hear. So SE-7s would do. They're only $199 for a stereo matched pair.

On 9/23/2019 6:54 PM, Georgina Joyce wrote:
Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73



Re: Looping With Audacity

JM Casey
 

I don't really know how to do this in Audacity ; I was using it a bit for a while but kind of put it on the back burnder. I'm trying to learn Reaper, but the learning curve is a bit steep. I could accomplish this using Goldwave. There is a trim silence feature you can use, and aside from that, you could always just find an appropriate place in the file and just repaste appropriately as needed. I think there are several ways to accomplish this and, maybe you'll have to get creative. If Audacity doesn't have a functino to automatically trim silence, or if it does but it still isn't to your liking (entirely possible), you'll have to edit manually. I have done this before as well but, it's been a while.
Sorry if this isn't too helpful, but, given the tools that you have, you should be able to accomplish something satisfactory. Someone more familiar with Audacity should certainly chime in.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Robbie Curtis
Sent: September 23, 2019 1:45 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Looping With Audacity

Hey Yall!


I need some help with looping a track using Audacity. I am helping a friend with her Youtube video and she wants some background music as she's talking. I know how to make the music repeat but I want to get rid of the silence in between the repetition of the song. I am totally blind so the mouse won't do me any good.


Would like your suggestions please. Thanks in advance.

--
Robbie J. Curtis
essence64@triad.rr.com
"Stay in peace, not pieces!"


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Uni-directional Microphones

Georgina Joyce
 

Hello,

A portable cardioid or shot-gun microphone taken by each speaker will give the best results but there is going to be some handling noise. Unless the mics are very expensive.

The common terms are omni-directional and figure 8 polar patterns that may meet the criteria as expressed.

The choice of microphone depends upon the quality desired and the money available. In addition to the event’s structure and location. If all participants are co-operative.

Gena
On 23 Sep 2019, at 22:09, tim cumings <thcumings@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.
On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson





Gena

Call: M0EBP
DMR ID: 2346259
Loc: IO83PS
73


Re: Uni-directional Microphones

tim cumings
 

Hi, Steve.
It depends what type of microphone you are talking about. If you mean a standard cardioid microphone, that might work fairly well. If you meansomething that is even more directional, like a shotgun microphone, it might be difficult if there are multiple speakers on the stage, since you would have to move the microphone back and forth to capture the audio from all the speakers.
Also in this particular situation I would advise that you use headphones to insure you are getting the best possible recording.

On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:32 AM, Steve Jacobson <steve.jacobson@outlook.com> wrote:

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson




Looping With Audacity

Robbie Curtis
 

Hey Yall!


I need some help with looping a track using Audacity. I am helping a friend with her Youtube video and she wants some background music as she's talking. I know how to make the music repeat but I want to get rid of the silence in between the repetition of the song. I am totally blind so the mouse won't do me any good.


Would like your suggestions please. Thanks in advance.

--
Robbie J. Curtis
essence64@triad.rr.com
"Stay in peace, not pieces!"


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Uni-directional Microphones

Steve Jacobson
 

Does anybody have experience with using a uni-directional microphone to record a presenter at a meeting from the audience? I know there are directional microphones that work well to allow a speaker to be picked up at a close range while suppressing feedback, for example, but I am interested in being able to better pick up a speaker from, say, the first row in the audience. Any thoughts on what degree this is practical would also be of interest.

Best regards,

Steve Jacobson


Re: Simple AM/FM radio?

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

No they won't, the PRD6 is a small bedside portable but will easily fit into a suitcase.
The PRD17 is a bigger set with stereo speakers, perhaps a little too big for your application.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Busboom
Sent: Monday, 23 September 2019 11:58 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: Re: [all-audio] Simple AM/FM radio?

Hey Dane,

Thank you very much for this info. Do you know if these radios wil fit into a shirt or pants pocket?

Thanks.


On 23.09.2019, at 15:22, Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net> wrote:

Yes indeed I can recommend something, the Sangean PRD6 which is as simple a radio as you can get.
The radio has an analogue tuing dial and 2 bands, AM and FM The sound
is great and can be fully adjusted to your taste with bass and treble controls.
AM performance is superb for a $30 radio.
If you want to go a few steps further then you might want to get the Sangean PRD17 AM/FM radio with Voice Prompts.
The PRD17 is an AM/FM unit but has voice readout so you know what frequency you are tuned to, has a useable alarm clock etc.
Both these radio sets are excellent buys.


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike
Busboom
Sent: Monday, 23 September 2019 11:05 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Simple AM/FM radio?

Hello everyone,

For my next trip to the US, where I used to live a long time ago, I’d like to purchase a small AM/FM radio that is simple to use. Many radios of this type these days have digital readouts and work well enough, but I am wondering if radios with just a tuner dial still exist.

Can anyone recommend something for me?

All the best, and thanks in advance,

Mike








Re: Simple AM/FM radio?

Mike Busboom
 

Hey Dane,

Thank you very much for this info. Do you know if these radios wil fit into a shirt or pants pocket?

Thanks.

On 23.09.2019, at 15:22, Dane Trethowan <grtdane@internode.on.net> wrote:

Yes indeed I can recommend something, the Sangean PRD6 which is as simple a radio as you can get.
The radio has an analogue tuing dial and 2 bands, AM and FM
The sound is great and can be fully adjusted to your taste with bass and treble controls.
AM performance is superb for a $30 radio.
If you want to go a few steps further then you might want to get the Sangean PRD17 AM/FM radio with Voice Prompts.
The PRD17 is an AM/FM unit but has voice readout so you know what frequency you are tuned to, has a useable alarm clock etc.
Both these radio sets are excellent buys.


-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Busboom
Sent: Monday, 23 September 2019 11:05 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Simple AM/FM radio?

Hello everyone,

For my next trip to the US, where I used to live a long time ago, I’d like to purchase a small AM/FM radio that is simple to use. Many radios of this type these days have digital readouts and work well enough, but I am wondering if radios with just a tuner dial still exist.

Can anyone recommend something for me?

All the best, and thanks in advance,

Mike








Re: Simple AM/FM radio?

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

Yes indeed I can recommend something, the Sangean PRD6 which is as simple a radio as you can get.
The radio has an analogue tuing dial and 2 bands, AM and FM
The sound is great and can be fully adjusted to your taste with bass and treble controls.
AM performance is superb for a $30 radio.
If you want to go a few steps further then you might want to get the Sangean PRD17 AM/FM radio with Voice Prompts.
The PRD17 is an AM/FM unit but has voice readout so you know what frequency you are tuned to, has a useable alarm clock etc.
Both these radio sets are excellent buys.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Busboom
Sent: Monday, 23 September 2019 11:05 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] Simple AM/FM radio?

Hello everyone,

For my next trip to the US, where I used to live a long time ago, I’d like to purchase a small AM/FM radio that is simple to use. Many radios of this type these days have digital readouts and work well enough, but I am wondering if radios with just a tuner dial still exist.

Can anyone recommend something for me?

All the best, and thanks in advance,

Mike


Simple AM/FM radio?

Mike Busboom
 

Hello everyone,

For my next trip to the US, where I used to live a long time ago, I’d like to purchase a small AM/FM radio that is simple to use. Many radios of this type these days have digital readouts and work well enough, but I am wondering if radios with just a tuner dial still exist.

Can anyone recommend something for me?

All the best, and thanks in advance,

Mike


Re: slightly OT - using tuneIn on the iphone through a vpn

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

And one other thing, what version of Tunein are you using? I'm using Tunein
Pro and things work here with my VPN so I can't say the same for the free
version of Tunein.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of André van
Deventer
Sent: Monday, 23 September 2019 6:27 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] slightly OT - using tuneIn on the iphone through a vpn

Hi all



I realize that this is slightly off topic. My sincere apologies.

I’m trying to get tuneInon the iphone to work through a vpn. The vpn is
definitely working but tuneIn refuses to recognize the vpn. Can someone
help with this?

Thanx and regards

André


Re: slightly OT - using tuneIn on the iphone through a vpn

Dane Trethowan <grtdane@...>
 

The obvious question I guess <smile>, what are you trying to listen to using
Tunein and how are you listening.
Are you wanting to listen to a stream and then stream what you hear to
another device for example? Problems can occur when say receiving a stream
with Tunein and then trying to cast the received stream to a Chromecast
device.

-----Original Message-----
From: all-audio@groups.io <all-audio@groups.io> On Behalf Of André van
Deventer
Sent: Monday, 23 September 2019 6:27 PM
To: all-audio@groups.io
Subject: [all-audio] slightly OT - using tuneIn on the iphone through a vpn

Hi all



I realize that this is slightly off topic. My sincere apologies.

I’m trying to get tuneInon the iphone to work through a vpn. The vpn is
definitely working but tuneIn refuses to recognize the vpn. Can someone
help with this?

Thanx and regards

André


slightly OT - using tuneIn on the iphone through a vpn

André van Deventer
 

Hi all



I realize that this is slightly off topic. My sincere apologies.

I’m trying to get tuneInon the iphone to work through a vpn. The vpn is
definitely working but tuneIn refuses to recognize the vpn. Can someone
help with this?

Thanx and regards

André

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