Topics

Windows or Linux

Ryan Barbier <ryanbarbierdesousa56@...>
 

Hi everyone,

I'm looking to get a single board computer compatible with SDR#, some people seem to have installed the software successfully with Mono for Linux. But some reported it working whereas others said the developers "removed" this possibility by making the code closed source.

Is installing and using SDR# still possible on Linux ? And if I have the choice between installing on Windows or Linux, is one more performant than the other or are they equal ?

Thank you

David J Taylor
 

Hi everyone,

I'm looking to get a single board computer compatible with SDR#, some people seem to have installed the software successfully with Mono for Linux. But some reported it working whereas others said the developers "removed" this possibility by making the code closed source.

Is installing and using SDR# still possible on Linux ? And if I have the choice between installing on Windows or Linux, is one more performant than the other or are they equal ?

Thank you
================================

Ryan,

My view is to choose the programs you need to run first, and then the OS which best suits those programs. On that basis, Windows is the choice.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as an inexpensive single board computer that runs Windows. Not bought new, anyway.

One possible option for running SDR# on the cheap is to track down one of the inexpensive Windows tablets that were sold a few years ago. Mostly they came with Windows 8, but if you get one with 2GB RAM and 32GB flash it can be upgraded to Windows 10 without difficulty (and still for free), and it will run SDR# well. CPU utilization will be high, but if you're only running the one application that's not a problem.

If you don't care about size and portability, just about any Windows laptop made in the past 10 years will suffice.

On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 3:44 PM David J Taylor via Groups.Io <david-taylor=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm looking to get a single board computer compatible with SDR#, some people
seem to have installed the software successfully with Mono for Linux. But
some reported it working whereas others said the developers "removed" this
possibility by making the code closed source.

Is installing and using SDR# still possible on Linux ? And if I have the
choice between installing on Windows or Linux, is one more performant than
the other or are they equal ?

Thank you
================================

Ryan,

My view is to choose the programs you need to run first, and then the OS
which best suits those programs.  On that basis, Windows is the choice.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv




Marcus D. Leech
 

On 02/05/2020 06:14 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:
Unfortunately, there is no such thing as an inexpensive single board computer that runs Windows. Not bought new, anyway.

One possible option for running SDR# on the cheap is to track down one of the inexpensive Windows tablets that were sold a few years ago. Mostly they came with Windows 8, but if you get one with 2GB RAM and 32GB flash it can be upgraded to Windows 10 without difficulty (and still for free), and it will run SDR# well. CPU utilization will be high, but if you're only running the one application that's not a problem.

If you don't care about size and portability, just about any Windows laptop made in the past 10 years will suffice.
Define "Inexpensive"??

A BeeLink BT3 comes with W10 already installed, for example, and is available for fairly cheap on Amazon...



On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 3:44 PM David J Taylor via Groups.Io <david-taylor=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm looking to get a single board computer compatible with SDR#, some people
seem to have installed the software successfully with Mono for Linux. But
some reported it working whereas others said the developers "removed" this
possibility by making the code closed source.

Is installing and using SDR# still possible on Linux ? And if I have the
choice between installing on Windows or Linux, is one more performant than
the other or are they equal ?

Thank you
================================

Ryan,

My view is to choose the programs you need to run first, and then the OS
which best suits those programs.  On that basis, Windows is the choice.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv





Ryan Barbier <ryanbarbierdesousa56@...>
 

I'll probably resort to a LattePanda then. The 2G/32G version is like 90$, but I might just get the 4G/64G to be sure.

Brian Gregory
 

On 05/02/2020 23:25, Ryan Barbier wrote:
I'll probably resort to a LattePanda then. The 2G/32G version is like 90$, but I might just get the 4G/64G to be sure.
You might find an Atom isn't really powerful enough so that you'll need to slow down the scrolling waterfall and/or restrict the bandwidth before it works well.

Brian Gregory.
@BrianG61UK
www.Brian-Gregory.me.uk
(Home)

Tom Snyder
 

Intel compute sticks run about $150, HDMI, two usb ports, microSD slot.

tom


From: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io> on behalf of Shirley Dulcey KE1L <mark@...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 5, 2020 15:14
To: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [airspy] Windows or Linux
 
Unfortunately, there is no such thing as an inexpensive single board computer that runs Windows. Not bought new, anyway.

One possible option for running SDR# on the cheap is to track down one of the inexpensive Windows tablets that were sold a few years ago. Mostly they came with Windows 8, but if you get one with 2GB RAM and 32GB flash it can be upgraded to Windows 10 without difficulty (and still for free), and it will run SDR# well. CPU utilization will be high, but if you're only running the one application that's not a problem.

If you don't care about size and portability, just about any Windows laptop made in the past 10 years will suffice.

On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 3:44 PM David J Taylor via Groups.Io <david-taylor=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm looking to get a single board computer compatible with SDR#, some people
seem to have installed the software successfully with Mono for Linux. But
some reported it working whereas others said the developers "removed" this
possibility by making the code closed source.

Is installing and using SDR# still possible on Linux ? And if I have the
choice between installing on Windows or Linux, is one more performant than
the other or are they equal ?

Thank you
================================

Ryan,

My view is to choose the programs you need to run first, and then the OS
which best suits those programs.  On that basis, Windows is the choice.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv




Greg Ella
 

Try running GQRX, SDRAngel and CubicSDR on Linux, and see if they will do what you need.  The current stable release of Debian (10.2) already has the
most current release of GQRX in it's software repo, so it is very easy to install.

Greg Ella
N0EMP


On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 11:51 PM Brian Gregory <bdgregory@...> wrote:
On 05/02/2020 23:25, Ryan Barbier wrote:
> I'll probably resort to a LattePanda then. The 2G/32G version is like
> 90$, but I might just get the 4G/64G to be sure.

You might find an Atom isn't really powerful enough so that you'll need
to slow down the scrolling waterfall and/or restrict the bandwidth
before it works well.

Brian Gregory.
bdgregory@...
www.Brian-Gregory.me.uk
(Home)




Martin Smith
 

SDR# still possible on Linux
The x86_64 and x86_32 library files required to run SDR# using Mono on Linux have not been updated since August 2017 ( https://groups.io/g/airspy/files ). So my gut feeling, without any testing, is no it is not going to work under x86 Linux using Mono to provide the .NET framework.

Back in 2015 before the external shark library was needed, I ran SDR# (v1363) once on an Odroid-XU4 using Mono and it did work, just about (https://twitter.com/sdrsharp/status/643509258001219584 I'm not even sure if I got the sound working or not, there was something oddball about that boards hardware when it came to audio, I do remember having a lot of problems. The CPUs all hit 90°C (194°F) and that was only sampling at 2.5MSPS using the Airspy R2, so needless to say I only ran SDRsharp.exe via Mono for a few seconds at a time. Mono required a lot of resources and was not as mature, as I am sure it is now, and there were many GUI glitches, like misalignment of text in menu pull downs, and the waterfall was mostly red and yellow, unable to get blue or black. And I only tried to run it on an 8 core ARM processor because I had the board and wanted to see if it could work. I was told that it was a bad idea, and I knew it was a bad idea before attempting, it was just me messing around, if I was being serious I would have tried it on x86 where there were more optimisation available for Mono.

For comparison running GQRX on the same board, used at least 90% less resources. Mono was a hog.

Anyhow from my experience if you want to use SDR# your only option is Windows (or a possibly a virtual machine running windows).

Mike Murphree N4MHO
 


On Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 10:37 AM Greg Ella <gregella53@...> wrote:
Try running GQRX, SDRAngel and CubicSDR on Linux, and see if they will do what you need.  The current stable release of Debian (10.2) already has the
most current release of GQRX in it's software repo, so it is very easy to install.

Greg Ella
N0EMP

On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 11:51 PM Brian Gregory <bdgregory@...> wrote:
On 05/02/2020 23:25, Ryan Barbier wrote:
> I'll probably resort to a LattePanda then. The 2G/32G version is like
> 90$, but I might just get the 4G/64G to be sure.

You might find an Atom isn't really powerful enough so that you'll need
to slow down the scrolling waterfall and/or restrict the bandwidth
before it works well.

Brian Gregory.
bdgregory@...
www.Brian-Gregory.me.uk
(Home)




Ross Keatinge
 

I know it's probably not the solution you're looking for but, for what it's worth, I have SDR# working nicely on Windows 10 in VirtualBox on Kubuntu 18.04 on a laptop.

I run SpyServer on the Linux host and access it via the network. I didn't have much luck using the USB passthrough directly. It worked but not very well.

I didn't have to buy Windows 10. I just downloaded it (legally) from Microsoft. It has the "Please activate" watermark in the lower right corner and I don't think I can customize the task bar but other than that it works normally.

Larry Dighera
 

On Wed, 5 Feb 2020 14:14:50 +0100, "Ryan Barbier"
<ryanbarbierdesousa56@...> wrote:

I'm looking to get a single board computer compatible with SDR#,

I use one of the Udoo X86 boards for Windows (and Linux, either
natively or through WSL): https://shop.udoo.org/products/x86.html
UDOO X86 II is 10 times more powerful than Raspberry Pi 3, able to
drive up to three 4K screens at the same time

CPU: Intel Celeron N3160 2.24 Ghz
4 GB DDR3L Dual Channel RAM
Intel HD Graphics 400. Up to 640 MHz
32GB eMMC storage
Arduino Leonardo-compatible and compatible with most arduino shields
5V compliant.
IR interface.
LPC - 2 x I2C - GPIOs - Touch Screen support.
Management signals on expansion connector.
RTC Battery + Connector Included.
3 x USB 3.0 type-A sockets.