Topics

source code of plugins

Glen Mabey
 

Hello,

From what I can gather, SDRSharp is not an open source project, but installers are freely available at https://airspy.com/download/ . I do see that certain tools/drivers are available under permissive open source licenses at https://github.com/airspy but it seems that those would be most useful for interfacing other SDR programs to AirSpy hardware.  I'm especially interested in the source code for the plugins listed at https://sdrchile.cl/en/ in particular the PAL/Secam TV one.  I thought that I saw a download link for source at http://www.rtl-sdr.ru/ but it was broken and now I can't find it.

Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Glen

Muhammad Shabazz
 

Went to google typed in 
'PAL/Secam TV sdr download' this page loaded: 'https://www.rtl-sdr.com/new-sdr-plugin-pal-secam-tv/'. 

There was a link on page that went to the link below.

If your using chrome it might auto translate, I had to click button on android.

Went to this page 'http://www.rtl-sdr.ru/page/no-title-2' bottom of page is Download link, at least on android it is.

 I'm not installing it at this moment, download at your own risk. Scan before you unzip to be on safe side. Downloads a file called tv.zip it's almost 10k. Happy steaming. 


On Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 1:59 PM Glen Mabey <gmabey@...> wrote:
Hello,

From what I can gather, SDRSharp is not an open source project, but installers are freely available at https://airspy.com/download/ . I do see that certain tools/drivers are available under permissive open source licenses at https://github.com/airspy but it seems that those would be most useful for interfacing other SDR programs to AirSpy hardware.  I'm especially interested in the source code for the plugins listed at https://sdrchile.cl/en/ in particular the PAL/Secam TV one.  I thought that I saw a download link for source at http://www.rtl-sdr.ru/ but it was broken and now I can't find it.

Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Glen

Glen Mabey
 

Thank you for that response.  In the links you included, there were only .dll files within .zip files -- no source code.

Is there no single body of source code for all of the plugins that Rodrigo provides with the community installer?

Thank you ...
Glen


On Wed, Nov 27, 2019 at 9:30 PM Muhammad Shabazz <korosu.san@...> wrote:
Went to google typed in 
'PAL/Secam TV sdr download' this page loaded: 'https://www.rtl-sdr.com/new-sdr-plugin-pal-secam-tv/'. 

There was a link on page that went to the link below.

If your using chrome it might auto translate, I had to click button on android.

Went to this page 'http://www.rtl-sdr.ru/page/no-title-2' bottom of page is Download link, at least on android it is.

 I'm not installing it at this moment, download at your own risk. Scan before you unzip to be on safe side. Downloads a file called tv.zip it's almost 10k. Happy steaming. 


On Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 1:59 PM Glen Mabey <gmabey@...> wrote:
Hello,

From what I can gather, SDRSharp is not an open source project, but installers are freely available at https://airspy.com/download/ . I do see that certain tools/drivers are available under permissive open source licenses at https://github.com/airspy but it seems that those would be most useful for interfacing other SDR programs to AirSpy hardware.  I'm especially interested in the source code for the plugins listed at https://sdrchile.cl/en/ in particular the PAL/Secam TV one.  I thought that I saw a download link for source at http://www.rtl-sdr.ru/ but it was broken and now I can't find it.

Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Glen

Rodrigo Pérez
 

I think you need to contact to plugin developers to ask about source code.

Regards

Edward MacDonald
 

Plugins are usually created by independant programmers, in their spare time, for free. Not many I have seen are open source.

You will have to ask each individual plugin coder for their source code. Good luck with that.

However your best bet may be the route many of us took and teach yourself how to code plugins yourself. Search in the user forums. Ask questions in the forums and be specific as possible.

To get started there is a download link on the Airspy download page towards the bottom. The author has included 3 examples (I think) in the zip file which are the Zoom FFT plugin, the Band Plan and one other. They are nicely commented and the API naming conventions explain what the functions do. The author is also very good at responding to new questions when asked.

Plugins are coded in C# and require the compiler directive to use Unsafe Code.

You must also be aware that since SDR# is not open source the API is proxied and relies on interfaces to implement your plugins. Do not the make the mistakes I did and try to circumvent the proxy. (I was uneducated at the time to the authors social contract). 

I am not an expert on SDR# plugin coding bit if you need help you can ask. My limited knowledge may be a start for you.

Good luck.




Glen Mabey
 

Thank you for the reply, Rodrigo.  I suppose that's how you got the source code, then?

Does anyone have contact information for the PAL/Secam plugin author?  Or, a name?

Thanks ...
Glen


On Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 11:59 AM Rodrigo Pérez <bilson@...> wrote:
I think you need to contact to plugin developers to ask about source code.

Regards

Glen Mabey
 

Thank you for your input, Edward. 

I don't know much about the culture surrounding SDR#, but it seems to me that if the authors of individual plugins were willing to publish their source code in a repository such as github, it would foster innovation within the user base, since anyone could improve others' plugins.  The original authors would not be obligated to accept contributions, but they could if they like them (easily, using the github interface).

Also, with many examples of how to write plugins available, it seems to me that this would make it easier for new users to write their own plugins.

If the original authors have some motivation to retain their source code, then surely they should keep it closed source.  But if they wrote it in their spare time and don't plan on trying to make money on it, they might as well share their expertise far and wide -- their generosity will surely come back to them someday.

Just some thoughts ...
Glen


On Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 12:20 PM Edward MacDonald <edwardmacdonald74@...> wrote:
Plugins are usually created by independant programmers, in their spare time, for free. Not many I have seen are open source.

You will have to ask each individual plugin coder for their source code. Good luck with that.

However your best bet may be the route many of us took and teach yourself how to code plugins yourself. Search in the user forums. Ask questions in the forums and be specific as possible.

To get started there is a download link on the Airspy download page towards the bottom. The author has included 3 examples (I think) in the zip file which are the Zoom FFT plugin, the Band Plan and one other. They are nicely commented and the API naming conventions explain what the functions do. The author is also very good at responding to new questions when asked.

Plugins are coded in C# and require the compiler directive to use Unsafe Code.

You must also be aware that since SDR# is not open source the API is proxied and relies on interfaces to implement your plugins. Do not the make the mistakes I did and try to circumvent the proxy. (I was uneducated at the time to the authors social contract). 

I am not an expert on SDR# plugin coding bit if you need help you can ask. My limited knowledge may be a start for you.

Good luck.




Rodrigo Pérez
 

No. I don't have source code. The installer download plugins from developer home page and configure for you. 

For PAL/Secam plugin you can go to plugin home page and you have a link to contact the author. http://rtl-sdr.ru/category/contactsanddonates

Regards.

Edward MacDonald
 

I agree with you somewhat, for me figuring out how to get the API calls working was the rewarding part and I wouldn't want to rob any newcomer of that. However, alot of passers by have an idea in their heads sometimes that we as coders are obligated to release our source code as open source. Usually not understanding the time and sacrifices coders sometimes make to produce said code, or alternatively they modify the code, claim its theirs when it works and blame the original coder when they break that code themselves.

If there is anything I can help you with please let me know. I don't mind sharing my code for most thing I code and I am an advocate of open source. I just dont publically post my SDR# code open source but will share when asked.



On Mon, Dec 2, 2019, 2:34 PM Glen Mabey, <gmabey@...> wrote:
Thank you for your input, Edward. 

I don't know much about the culture surrounding SDR#, but it seems to me that if the authors of individual plugins were willing to publish their source code in a repository such as github, it would foster innovation within the user base, since anyone could improve others' plugins.  The original authors would not be obligated to accept contributions, but they could if they like them (easily, using the github interface).

Also, with many examples of how to write plugins available, it seems to me that this would make it easier for new users to write their own plugins.

If the original authors have some motivation to retain their source code, then surely they should keep it closed source.  But if they wrote it in their spare time and don't plan on trying to make money on it, they might as well share their expertise far and wide -- their generosity will surely come back to them someday.

Just some thoughts ...
Glen

On Mon, Dec 2, 2019 at 12:20 PM Edward MacDonald <edwardmacdonald74@...> wrote:
Plugins are usually created by independant programmers, in their spare time, for free. Not many I have seen are open source.

You will have to ask each individual plugin coder for their source code. Good luck with that.

However your best bet may be the route many of us took and teach yourself how to code plugins yourself. Search in the user forums. Ask questions in the forums and be specific as possible.

To get started there is a download link on the Airspy download page towards the bottom. The author has included 3 examples (I think) in the zip file which are the Zoom FFT plugin, the Band Plan and one other. They are nicely commented and the API naming conventions explain what the functions do. The author is also very good at responding to new questions when asked.

Plugins are coded in C# and require the compiler directive to use Unsafe Code.

You must also be aware that since SDR# is not open source the API is proxied and relies on interfaces to implement your plugins. Do not the make the mistakes I did and try to circumvent the proxy. (I was uneducated at the time to the authors social contract). 

I am not an expert on SDR# plugin coding bit if you need help you can ask. My limited knowledge may be a start for you.

Good luck.