Topics

Low-noise WiFi Router

Richard Langley
 

This might be a tad off topic but I'm shopping for a new Wi-Fi router (no just a Wi-Fi extender) and would like to get one that produces a minimum amount of hash in the SW bands that might affect my Airspy and other SDR receivers. Are there specific models now on the market I should stay away from and/or is there a favoured model? It certainly used to be the case that some were worse than others in the amount of RFI they generated. Feel free to direct me to another group or website as appropriate. Thanks.

-- Richard Langley

Bjarne Mjelde
 

I have yet to find a wifi router that produces noticeable amounts of RFI. I have used Huawei and TP-Link routers. It is usually the power supplies. Most will run on 12VDC so it should be quite straightforward to find a good power supply.
--
Bjarne Mjelde
arcticdx.blogspot.com
Remote receivers: 
arcticsdr.ddns.net:8073/
kongsdr.ddns.net:8074

Robert Nobis
 

I have used wireless routers from Apple, Ubiquity, and Synology, and have not experienced any noise. Any noise issue with wireless ruers are most likely caused by switch mode power supplies, and can be easily handled.


Bob Nobis 
n7rjn@...


Richard Langley
 

Thanks for all the great advice both in the forum and directly. When I get a new unit, I'll check the power supply in particlar and choke it (!) or replace it as necessary.

-- Richard Langley

KD2OM
 

 I also haven't found any RFI from the routers, only the power supplies. I always use shielded CAT 5 cables and put a plastic ethernet coupler in each line to be sure I don't get a ground loop.
--
Steve KD2OM

Stephen QRP
 

Hello Steve

I am curious, what difference do plastic ethernet couplers make ? I have ethernet cables running all over the house, some shielded whilst others are not.
I am not aware that these ethernet cables are causing problems. Whilst the coupler might break the earth link on shielded cables, I have always understood that the twisted cable pairs do a good job of isolation .

73 Stephen
M0GWI

Mike Bott
 

I'm currently using an older Netgrear WN2500RP to support my kiwiSDR.  Purchased refurbished for $15.00.  No noise detected from it or the PSU.  Been in use about 2 years now.  Will go brain dead evary 4 months or so and takes about 10 minutes to reset and retrain.
I actually purchased 2 and the other one is still boxed.  I bought these to prove the concept and just continued using this one.  Some day I might invest in one that doesn't go loopy every 4 months.

Hope this helps.

--
Mike

On 1/6/2020 16:51:49, Richard Langley wrote:
This might be a tad off topic but I'm shopping for a new Wi-Fi router (no just a Wi-Fi extender) and would like to get one that produces a minimum amount of hash in the SW bands that might affect my Airspy and other SDR receivers. Are there specific models now on the market I should stay away from and/or is there a favoured model? It certainly used to be the case that some were worse than others in the amount of RFI they generated. Feel free to direct me to another group or website as appropriate. Thanks.

-- Richard Langley

Mike Bott
 

I'm currently using an older Netgrear WN2500RP to support my kiwiSDR. Purchased refurbished for $15.00. No noise detected from it or the PSU. Been in use about 2 years now. Will go brain dead every 4 months or so and takes about 10 minutes to reset and retrain.
I actually purchased 2 and the other one is still boxed. I bought these to prove the concept and just continued using this one. Some day I might invest in one that doesn't go loopy every 4 months.

Hope this helps.

--
Mike

Steve Sykes
 

Hi Stephen,
I always use shielded cables, some are shielded twisted pairs and some have overall shields only.  The coupler breaks the shield on all of them. I am not sure that it makes a real difference but it can’t hurt.
I originally saw the suggestion on the Flexradio site. I believe the twisted pairs provide good balance but the shields can cause ground loops. Ferrites can stop the common mode currents on the outside shield but I am not sure what they do for the individual internal shields.

73
Steve KD2OM
 

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 16:00 Stephen QRP via Groups.Io <stephen_qrp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Steve

I am curious, what difference do plastic ethernet couplers make ? I have ethernet cables running all over the house, some shielded whilst others are not.
I am not aware that these ethernet cables are causing problems. Whilst the coupler might break the earth link on shielded cables, I have always understood that the twisted cable pairs do a good job of isolation .

73 Stephen
M0GWI

Greg Ella
 

My house came pre-wired for Ethernet to every room, and I initially used Ethernet for most of my computers, even lap tops.
After putting an SDR on line full time, and trying to fight Ethernet RFI, the light bulb finally went on.  Now I have only one device, a Kiwi SDR, on a LAN cable (CAT 7 shielded twisted pair, big ferrites on both ends).  EVERYTHING else, including tower computers, is on WiFi.  Noise is way down.

Greg Ella
N0EMP


On Sat, Jan 11, 2020 at 10:18 AM Steve Sykes <sesykes71@...> wrote:
Hi Stephen,
I always use shielded cables, some are shielded twisted pairs and some have overall shields only.  The coupler breaks the shield on all of them. I am not sure that it makes a real difference but it can’t hurt.
I originally saw the suggestion on the Flexradio site. I believe the twisted pairs provide good balance but the shields can cause ground loops. Ferrites can stop the common mode currents on the outside shield but I am not sure what they do for the individual internal shields.

73
Steve KD2OM
 

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 16:00 Stephen QRP via Groups.Io <stephen_qrp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Steve

I am curious, what difference do plastic ethernet couplers make ? I have ethernet cables running all over the house, some shielded whilst others are not.
I am not aware that these ethernet cables are causing problems. Whilst the coupler might break the earth link on shielded cables, I have always understood that the twisted cable pairs do a good job of isolation .

73 Stephen
M0GWI

fudge@...
 

I use a Netgear WNR2000v5 router with no problems. It is powered by a AC/DC Walwart type +12Vdc supply. The wireless transceiver frequencies are much higher than the max operating frequency of my SDR so there is no RFI present.
Beware of this type of Netgear router as there are problems with establishing a proper IP address and Domain Name Server. Of you have any doubts, use the Ethernet wired connection.
--
John VA3JQ Barry's Bay, Ontario, Canada