Topics

Airspy HF+ preselector #airspyhfplus


valerio spagnolo
 

Hello guys, i'm looking to add the preselector inside my Airspy HF+.
I know that a preselector it has been put inside the new Airspy Discovery.
Where i can buy this unit? Anyone could help me?

Tnx, Merry Xmas !

IU3BTY Valerio


Alan G4ZFQ
 

I know that a preselector it has been put inside the new Airspy Discovery.
Where i can buy this unit? Anyone could help me?
Valerio,

It was never sold for the first HF+ and must be integral in the Discovery.

73 Alan G4ZFQ


BryonB
 

I'd be interested in the HF+ preselector also, if it ever became available, as I have both HF+ and Discovery. 

I love the Discovery, but HF+ seems much sturdier, and with the pre-selector and dual antennas (one for VHF) would be super convenient.

What I'd really like is:
- HF+ dual port style, with preselector, 
- slightly bigger metal case, with
BNC or N-Type antenna connectors, 
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
      - or, even better -
- Isolated computer interface that keeps PC noise out of the RF signal detector path
- maybe Direct Ethernet connection to PC or router

Every PC I've tried so far injects too much PC noise via USB port.

Raspberry Pi looks like just another RF noise generator with multiple antennas connected (with all the cable connections needed).


--
--Bryon, NF6M


Martin Smith
 
Edited

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
What I'd *really* like is:
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
That would make it less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).

Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
(ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability )


jdow
 

On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
What I'd *really* like is:
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).

Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
(ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability )

Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters. I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least, dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before the connector.

{^_^}


jdow
 

On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
[Edited Message Follows]

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
What I'd *really* like is:
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
That would make it less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).

Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
(ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability )


What is their rating for cable flexure on the connectors? Connector flexure while plugged in has misaligned at least one USB micro pin. They're bloody fragile little things. Plugging in with a slight misalignment - byebye cable.

{+_+}


Dale Elshoff WB8CJW
 

USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm guessing.  Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀


On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
What I'd *really* like is:
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).

Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
(ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability )

Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters. I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least, dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before the connector.

{^_^}


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Ian Brooks
 

I have a portable USB speaker and a LG smartphone which still basically work except that the microUSB sockets are broken. Neither were plugged or unplugged more than 50 times. I managed to by-pass the USB connector on the speaker, but the smartphone is another matter. MicroUSB sockets that are recessed too far into the plastic case are another problem giving rise to unreliable connexions.

On 03/01/2021 00:17, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm guessing.  Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀


On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
What I'd *really* like is:
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).

Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
(ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability )

Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters. I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least, dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before the connector.

{^_^}


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Joe M.
 

I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out. TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
(and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion. Unfortunately most of
the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
the wrong way. A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀


On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
What I'd *really* like is:
- bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).

Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
(ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability )
Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
the connector.

{^_^}

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Joshuah Rainstar
 

A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
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jdow
 

Because from an RF standpoint SO-239 sucks dead bunnies through garden hoses at RF above about 10-20 MHz. BNC contacts become intermittent over time. N is mostly good up to a couple GHz where it goes to hell. SMA is good "way up there".

The usual failure with SMA would fail the same way,only quicker, for BNC, N. or the sadly misnamed "UHF" connectors, by getting ripped off the PC board. The other mode of SMA failure is over tightening. Those who over tighten get what they earned. Short small coax cables into the boxes with female connectors for the antenna wires is the way to go for reception. For transmission it gets dicey and requires a good layout and chassis mounted connectors.

{^_^}

On 20210102 20:07:32, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon>
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Joshuah Rainstar
 

i hear what you're saying but i think that the SMA connector is not being used because of the frequency response
but rather because it is dirt cheap, like microusb. it offers only -60db of rf isolation and limited power handling.
and most importantly, it is not as gorilla resistant as some of the other connectors.

I cannot be alone in feeling that most if not all amatuer listening supplies are not weatherized in the slightest except amplifiers.
In particular, the youloop balun and crossover housings have no gaskets. the sma cable connectors have no gaskets.
this is somewhat troubling when you realize  the kind of swl'er or ham who buys these receivers and these antennas
 probably makes a lot of their own equipment, probably does a lot of repair work and customizing on their setup. 
these receivers and antennas are not being used "in the shack". they are being used in the field. 

SMA and microusb have no place "in the field", even on a super-duper affordable rig.

 If I had my druthers, we'd be using TNC connectors and magnetized usb-c on fully watertight, sealed systems.
TNC has just as good of a practically usable frequency response, can handle some power, and is pretty durable.

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 12:09 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:
Because from an RF standpoint SO-239 sucks dead bunnies through garden hoses at RF above about 10-20 MHz. BNC contacts become intermittent over time. N is mostly good up to a couple GHz where it goes to hell. SMA is good "way up there".

The usual failure with SMA would fail the same way,only quicker, for BNC, N. or the sadly misnamed "UHF" connectors, by getting ripped off the PC board. The other mode of SMA failure is over tightening. Those who over tighten get what they earned. Short small coax cables into the boxes with female connectors for the antenna wires is the way to go for reception. For transmission it gets dicey and requires a good layout and chassis mounted connectors.

{^_^}

On 20210102 20:07:32, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
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>







jdow
 

Wouldn't it be more fun to use APC-7 connectors? Then you'll never have to find a double male or double female adapter. But still for 18 GHz to 36.5 GHz varieties of SMA are better.

Another "feature" of SMA is that it's not designed for patch cable use. And if you rotate the cable, hence center pin, relative to the socket you risk ruining the connector rather rapidly. However, it's not size compatible anymore. If you want big connectors get a large box, install the bulkhead connector, connect it's cable on the inside of the box to the SMA. Set it all up once and have fun with your bigger connectors to your heart's content.

{O.O}

On 20210103 01:02:45, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
i hear what you're saying but i think that the SMA connector is not being used because of the frequency response
but rather because it is dirt cheap, like microusb. it offers only -60db of rf isolation and limited power handling.
and most importantly, it is not as gorilla resistant as some of the other connectors.

I cannot be alone in feeling that most if not all amatuer listening supplies are not weatherized in the slightest except amplifiers.
In particular, the youloop balun and crossover housings have no gaskets. the sma cable connectors have no gaskets.
this is somewhat troubling when you realize  the kind of swl'er or ham who buys these receivers and these antennas
 probably makes a lot of their own equipment, probably does a lot of repair work and customizing on their setup. 
these receivers and antennas are not being used "in the shack". they are being used in the field. 

SMA and microusb have no place "in the field", even on a super-duper affordable rig.

 If I had my druthers, we'd be using TNC connectors and magnetized usb-c on fully watertight, sealed systems.
TNC has just as good of a practically usable frequency response, can handle some power, and is pretty durable.

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 12:09 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:
Because from an RF standpoint SO-239 sucks dead bunnies through garden hoses at RF above about 10-20 MHz. BNC contacts become intermittent over time. N is mostly good up to a couple GHz where it goes to hell. SMA is good "way up there".

The usual failure with SMA would fail the same way,only quicker, for BNC, N. or the sadly misnamed "UHF" connectors, by getting ripped off the PC board. The other mode of SMA failure is over tightening. Those who over tighten get what they earned. Short small coax cables into the boxes with female connectors for the antenna wires is the way to go for reception. For transmission it gets dicey and requires a good layout and chassis mounted connectors.

{^_^}

On 20210102 20:07:32, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
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Ian Brooks
 

I still have a patch of hard skin on the side of the forefinger of my left hand courtesy of the TNC connectors that were used on the analogue cellphone (TACS) equipment used by my former employer in the UK. Some 15-20 years later it's still there. The equipment also used SMA connectors with solid copper coax U-links to connect the individual units on the shelf together. Operating frequencies were in the 870-960MHz range. When GSM came along, an enterprising colleague converted one of these, using its frequency synthesing capabilities, for the original UK CB FM band in the 900 MHz range.

On 03/01/2021 11:41, jdow wrote:
Wouldn't it be more fun to use APC-7 connectors? Then you'll never have to find a double male or double female adapter. But still for 18 GHz to 36.5 GHz varieties of SMA are better.

Another "feature" of SMA is that it's not designed for patch cable use. And if you rotate the cable, hence center pin, relative to the socket you risk ruining the connector rather rapidly. However, it's not size compatible anymore. If you want big connectors get a large box, install the bulkhead connector, connect it's cable on the inside of the box to the SMA. Set it all up once and have fun with your bigger connectors to your heart's content.

{O.O}

On 20210103 01:02:45, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
i hear what you're saying but i think that the SMA connector is not being used because of the frequency response
but rather because it is dirt cheap, like microusb. it offers only -60db of rf isolation and limited power handling.
and most importantly, it is not as gorilla resistant as some of the other connectors.

I cannot be alone in feeling that most if not all amatuer listening supplies are not weatherized in the slightest except amplifiers.
In particular, the youloop balun and crossover housings have no gaskets. the sma cable connectors have no gaskets.
this is somewhat troubling when you realize  the kind of swl'er or ham who buys these receivers and these antennas
 probably makes a lot of their own equipment, probably does a lot of repair work and customizing on their setup. 
these receivers and antennas are not being used "in the shack". they are being used in the field. 

SMA and microusb have no place "in the field", even on a super-duper affordable rig.

 If I had my druthers, we'd be using TNC connectors and magnetized usb-c on fully watertight, sealed systems.
TNC has just as good of a practically usable frequency response, can handle some power, and is pretty durable.

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 12:09 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:
Because from an RF standpoint SO-239 sucks dead bunnies through garden hoses at RF above about 10-20 MHz. BNC contacts become intermittent over time. N is mostly good up to a couple GHz where it goes to hell. SMA is good "way up there".

The usual failure with SMA would fail the same way,only quicker, for BNC, N. or the sadly misnamed "UHF" connectors, by getting ripped off the PC board. The other mode of SMA failure is over tightening. Those who over tighten get what they earned. Short small coax cables into the boxes with female connectors for the antenna wires is the way to go for reception. For transmission it gets dicey and requires a good layout and chassis mounted connectors.

{^_^}

On 20210102 20:07:32, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
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Greg Ella
 

If you are worried about the mechanical cycle lifetime of the USB connector, mount the SDR on a base, plug in a USB cable, and anchor the cable at the SDR end.
I did this with my original Airspy R0 because the USB connector was surface mount and a couple of people had them pop off.

Greg Ella
N0EMP


On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 6:08 AM Ian Brooks <ian.brooks4073@...> wrote:

I still have a patch of hard skin on the side of the forefinger of my left hand courtesy of the TNC connectors that were used on the analogue cellphone (TACS) equipment used by my former employer in the UK. Some 15-20 years later it's still there. The equipment also used SMA connectors with solid copper coax U-links to connect the individual units on the shelf together. Operating frequencies were in the 870-960MHz range. When GSM came along, an enterprising colleague converted one of these, using its frequency synthesing capabilities, for the original UK CB FM band in the 900 MHz range.

On 03/01/2021 11:41, jdow wrote:
Wouldn't it be more fun to use APC-7 connectors? Then you'll never have to find a double male or double female adapter. But still for 18 GHz to 36.5 GHz varieties of SMA are better.

Another "feature" of SMA is that it's not designed for patch cable use. And if you rotate the cable, hence center pin, relative to the socket you risk ruining the connector rather rapidly. However, it's not size compatible anymore. If you want big connectors get a large box, install the bulkhead connector, connect it's cable on the inside of the box to the SMA. Set it all up once and have fun with your bigger connectors to your heart's content.

{O.O}

On 20210103 01:02:45, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
i hear what you're saying but i think that the SMA connector is not being used because of the frequency response
but rather because it is dirt cheap, like microusb. it offers only -60db of rf isolation and limited power handling.
and most importantly, it is not as gorilla resistant as some of the other connectors.

I cannot be alone in feeling that most if not all amatuer listening supplies are not weatherized in the slightest except amplifiers.
In particular, the youloop balun and crossover housings have no gaskets. the sma cable connectors have no gaskets.
this is somewhat troubling when you realize  the kind of swl'er or ham who buys these receivers and these antennas
 probably makes a lot of their own equipment, probably does a lot of repair work and customizing on their setup. 
these receivers and antennas are not being used "in the shack". they are being used in the field. 

SMA and microusb have no place "in the field", even on a super-duper affordable rig.

 If I had my druthers, we'd be using TNC connectors and magnetized usb-c on fully watertight, sealed systems.
TNC has just as good of a practically usable frequency response, can handle some power, and is pretty durable.

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 12:09 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:
Because from an RF standpoint SO-239 sucks dead bunnies through garden hoses at RF above about 10-20 MHz. BNC contacts become intermittent over time. N is mostly good up to a couple GHz where it goes to hell. SMA is good "way up there".

The usual failure with SMA would fail the same way,only quicker, for BNC, N. or the sadly misnamed "UHF" connectors, by getting ripped off the PC board. The other mode of SMA failure is over tightening. Those who over tighten get what they earned. Short small coax cables into the boxes with female connectors for the antenna wires is the way to go for reception. For transmission it gets dicey and requires a good layout and chassis mounted connectors.

{^_^}

On 20210102 20:07:32, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon>
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>








BryonB
 

The HF+/Discovery receivers have no need for connectors that operate up into the GHz range, since they top out their range at 250 MHz.

I'd honestly be happy with any antenna connector that had a sturdy mechanical chassis grounding setup that prevented rotation and had a decent lifespan. An SO-239 may pull rabbits through, but I've never had one break mechanically or rotate. I feel like the SMA held mechanically by one nut and a few tiny solder blobs on a tiny circuit board is just too easily rotated and broken, especially if the nut ever works loose. I have same issue on the tiny NanoVNA devices. Any device that won't be carefully connected and then tucked away on a shelf forever afterwards needs antenna connectors that can survive a bit of twisting more than once or twice.

USB-C would be more convenient than Micro-USB, but it seems like also being tiny, doesn't allow for very sturdy cables with good shielding. And so far, no USB connection seems to prevent RF from PC using USB wire as antenna. I've also had USB-C connectors that are loose and fall out easily. My only real beef with USB is the RF interference from any and every PC/cable combination I've tried. It ruins the low noise design of the receiver. PC and motherboard makers don't give you any information or choices about USB RF isolation.

I haven't had a USB-B connector fail, but then I usually see them on things like printers which don't get a lot of connect/disconnect action. I have tons of USB-B cables (big "squared" plug), and they always seem to work - built with much more shielding and much more sturdy construction. It is an old standard though, and USB-C seems to have the mind share now, which may make it cheaper. Of course, it implies the newer USB 3.1+ interface standards, which may be incompatible with "RF isolated" function also. 

For an HF receiver, I wonder if a properly designed USB-RF (2GHz wireless dongle type connection with no pairing needed like Bluetooth) would keep PC isolated and give low enough latency and have enough bandwidth. At least that wouldn't allow USB to become antenna for garbage inside PC so easily. That class of wireless connection doesn't seem to require special drivers.
I'd consider a battery powered device - something like a 18650 Lithium battery would last a long time and might operate an SDR more quietly over RF connection than with USB power from PC.

Obviously all those sorts of things add cost, but if it meant I actually got the low noise performance the receiver is capable of, I would consider paying more to get them.

The ability to place the receiver at the antenna (YouLoop or similar) outdoors and away from garbage noise sources might be just the ticket.


--
--Bryon, NF6M


David Eckhardt
 

PLEASE....... let's stick with impedance controlled connectors!  An SO-239 / PL-259 do NOT fall in that category and, heaven forbid (!!!), neither do USB connectors.  Type N would be the choice if one needs a more robust connector.  Even a good BNC is better than the SO-239!  For frequencies below 200 MHz, I usually use adaptors to convert from SMA to BNC.   Remember that the digital designers of today do not necessarily honor long established best engineering practices when it comes to connectors and impedance.  

Dave - WØLEV


On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 6:47 PM BryonB <rf.excitation@...> wrote:
The HF+/Discovery receivers have no need for connectors that operate up into the GHz range, since they top out their range at 250 MHz.

I'd honestly be happy with any antenna connector that had a sturdy mechanical chassis grounding setup that prevented rotation and had a decent lifespan. An SO-239 may pull rabbits through, but I've never had one break mechanically or rotate. I feel like the SMA held mechanically by one nut and a few tiny solder blobs on a tiny circuit board is just too easily rotated and broken, especially if the nut ever works loose. I have same issue on the tiny NanoVNA devices. Any device that won't be carefully connected and then tucked away on a shelf forever afterwards needs antenna connectors that can survive a bit of twisting more than once or twice.

USB-C would be more convenient than Micro-USB, but it seems like also being tiny, doesn't allow for very sturdy cables with good shielding. And so far, no USB connection seems to prevent RF from PC using USB wire as antenna. I've also had USB-C connectors that are loose and fall out easily. My only real beef with USB is the RF interference from any and every PC/cable combination I've tried. It ruins the low noise design of the receiver. PC and motherboard makers don't give you any information or choices about USB RF isolation.

I haven't had a USB-B connector fail, but then I usually see them on things like printers which don't get a lot of connect/disconnect action. I have tons of USB-B cables (big "squared" plug), and they always seem to work - built with much more shielding and much more sturdy construction. It is an old standard though, and USB-C seems to have the mind share now, which may make it cheaper. Of course, it implies the newer USB 3.1+ interface standards, which may be incompatible with "RF isolated" function also. 

For an HF receiver, I wonder if a properly designed USB-RF (2GHz wireless dongle type connection with no pairing needed like Bluetooth) would keep PC isolated and give low enough latency and have enough bandwidth. At least that wouldn't allow USB to become antenna for garbage inside PC so easily. That class of wireless connection doesn't seem to require special drivers.
I'd consider a battery powered device - something like a 18650 Lithium battery would last a long time and might operate an SDR more quietly over RF connection than with USB power from PC.

Obviously all those sorts of things add cost, but if it meant I actually got the low noise performance the receiver is capable of, I would consider paying more to get them.

The ability to place the receiver at the antenna (YouLoop or similar) outdoors and away from garbage noise sources might be just the ticket.


--
--Bryon, NF6M



--
Dave - WØLEV
Just Let Darwin Work


Steve Sykes
 

I agree with Dave! SO-239/PL-259 connectors are crap.  I like the SMA just fine for these small SDR radios. Cables built with them are more difficult to build, a small price to pay for a proper RF connector
73
Steve KD2OM

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 14:23 David Eckhardt <davearea51a@...> wrote:
PLEASE....... let's stick with impedance controlled connectors!  An SO-239 / PL-259 do NOT fall in that category and, heaven forbid (!!!), neither do USB connectors.  Type N would be the choice if one needs a more robust connector.  Even a good BNC is better than the SO-239!  For frequencies below 200 MHz, I usually use adaptors to convert from SMA to BNC.   Remember that the digital designers of today do not necessarily honor long established best engineering practices when it comes to connectors and impedance.  

Dave - WØLEV

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 6:47 PM BryonB <rf.excitation@...> wrote:
The HF+/Discovery receivers have no need for connectors that operate up into the GHz range, since they top out their range at 250 MHz.

I'd honestly be happy with any antenna connector that had a sturdy mechanical chassis grounding setup that prevented rotation and had a decent lifespan. An SO-239 may pull rabbits through, but I've never had one break mechanically or rotate. I feel like the SMA held mechanically by one nut and a few tiny solder blobs on a tiny circuit board is just too easily rotated and broken, especially if the nut ever works loose. I have same issue on the tiny NanoVNA devices. Any device that won't be carefully connected and then tucked away on a shelf forever afterwards needs antenna connectors that can survive a bit of twisting more than once or twice.

USB-C would be more convenient than Micro-USB, but it seems like also being tiny, doesn't allow for very sturdy cables with good shielding. And so far, no USB connection seems to prevent RF from PC using USB wire as antenna. I've also had USB-C connectors that are loose and fall out easily. My only real beef with USB is the RF interference from any and every PC/cable combination I've tried. It ruins the low noise design of the receiver. PC and motherboard makers don't give you any information or choices about USB RF isolation.

I haven't had a USB-B connector fail, but then I usually see them on things like printers which don't get a lot of connect/disconnect action. I have tons of USB-B cables (big "squared" plug), and they always seem to work - built with much more shielding and much more sturdy construction. It is an old standard though, and USB-C seems to have the mind share now, which may make it cheaper. Of course, it implies the newer USB 3.1+ interface standards, which may be incompatible with "RF isolated" function also. 

For an HF receiver, I wonder if a properly designed USB-RF (2GHz wireless dongle type connection with no pairing needed like Bluetooth) would keep PC isolated and give low enough latency and have enough bandwidth. At least that wouldn't allow USB to become antenna for garbage inside PC so easily. That class of wireless connection doesn't seem to require special drivers.
I'd consider a battery powered device - something like a 18650 Lithium battery would last a long time and might operate an SDR more quietly over RF connection than with USB power from PC.

Obviously all those sorts of things add cost, but if it meant I actually got the low noise performance the receiver is capable of, I would consider paying more to get them.

The ability to place the receiver at the antenna (YouLoop or similar) outdoors and away from garbage noise sources might be just the ticket.


--
--Bryon, NF6M



--
Dave - WØLEV
Just Let Darwin Work


Joe M.
 

But other Airspy units go much higher and there is
something to be said for uniformity across products.

The UHF would be a far worse choice.

Really, the argument being presented is that you would
rather see the board be torn than the connector break.

The solution is to simply not torque the connector
as you would a gas pipe fitting - problem solved!

Personally I like BNCs, but on the other hand I've never broken an SMA.

But, if you want to connect using UHF, by all means buy a UHF pigtail.

Joe M.

On 1/3/2021 1:46 PM, BryonB wrote:
The HF+/Discovery receivers have no need for connectors that operate up
into the GHz range, since they top out their range at 250 MHz.


jdow
 

I always dug around for the oddball wrench I had in the tool drawer. It worked with SMA. It was small enough it was easy not to over tighten the connectors to distort them. And it allowed good tightening without generating sore fingers.

That was at work, At home I pulled all the SO-239 connectors on my ham gear and replaced them with an N or BNC connector depending on the usage pattern.

And this reminds me of the frustration with trying to tighten PL-259 connectors. They do not tighten and do not stay tightened without using a hand knurling device like vice grips. And even then if the cable swayed in the breeze it would loosen. Type N connectors never did that for me.

{^_^}

On 20210103 05:07:42, Ian Brooks wrote:

I still have a patch of hard skin on the side of the forefinger of my left hand courtesy of the TNC connectors that were used on the analogue cellphone (TACS) equipment used by my former employer in the UK. Some 15-20 years later it's still there. The equipment also used SMA connectors with solid copper coax U-links to connect the individual units on the shelf together. Operating frequencies were in the 870-960MHz range. When GSM came along, an enterprising colleague converted one of these, using its frequency synthesing capabilities, for the original UK CB FM band in the 900 MHz range.

On 03/01/2021 11:41, jdow wrote:
Wouldn't it be more fun to use APC-7 connectors? Then you'll never have to find a double male or double female adapter. But still for 18 GHz to 36.5 GHz varieties of SMA are better.

Another "feature" of SMA is that it's not designed for patch cable use. And if you rotate the cable, hence center pin, relative to the socket you risk ruining the connector rather rapidly. However, it's not size compatible anymore. If you want big connectors get a large box, install the bulkhead connector, connect it's cable on the inside of the box to the SMA. Set it all up once and have fun with your bigger connectors to your heart's content.

{O.O}

On 20210103 01:02:45, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
i hear what you're saying but i think that the SMA connector is not being used because of the frequency response
but rather because it is dirt cheap, like microusb. it offers only -60db of rf isolation and limited power handling.
and most importantly, it is not as gorilla resistant as some of the other connectors.

I cannot be alone in feeling that most if not all amatuer listening supplies are not weatherized in the slightest except amplifiers.
In particular, the youloop balun and crossover housings have no gaskets. the sma cable connectors have no gaskets.
this is somewhat troubling when you realize  the kind of swl'er or ham who buys these receivers and these antennas
 probably makes a lot of their own equipment, probably does a lot of repair work and customizing on their setup. 
these receivers and antennas are not being used "in the shack". they are being used in the field. 

SMA and microusb have no place "in the field", even on a super-duper affordable rig.

 If I had my druthers, we'd be using TNC connectors and magnetized usb-c on fully watertight, sealed systems.
TNC has just as good of a practically usable frequency response, can handle some power, and is pretty durable.

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 12:09 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:
Because from an RF standpoint SO-239 sucks dead bunnies through garden hoses at RF above about 10-20 MHz. BNC contacts become intermittent over time. N is mostly good up to a couple GHz where it goes to hell. SMA is good "way up there".

The usual failure with SMA would fail the same way,only quicker, for BNC, N. or the sadly misnamed "UHF" connectors, by getting ripped off the PC board. The other mode of SMA failure is over tightening. Those who over tighten get what they earned. Short small coax cables into the boxes with female connectors for the antenna wires is the way to go for reception. For transmission it gets dicey and requires a good layout and chassis mounted connectors.

{^_^}

On 20210102 20:07:32, Joshuah Rainstar wrote:
A permanent magnetic usb-c terminal with a magnetic tip would solve this problem very well. 
the usb-c standard is all fine and well but the products do not live up to the standard. the cables fail easily.
same thing for everything but usb-b. 

and if we were really concerned with reliability, why do we so readily swallow the use of sma connectors, instead of demanding N/BNC/SO-259?

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 6:50 PM Joe M. <mch@...> wrote:
I have a device (that shall go unnamed) that has a USB Type B on it. I
swear I'm going to pull the whole thing off the board and out of the
case when I try to unplug it. I doubt my wife could pull it out.
TERRIBLE! USB Type B would also be too large for Airspy units, as the
connector is larger than the case.

I agree that currently the USB-C is the best choice, but I don't know
how much they cost by comparison. The biggest advantage IMHO is that you
can't plug them in 'upside down' - they are bidirectional. Every other
USB connector has that downfall. The downside is that not many PCs have
them overall, and those that do have few of them (often only one).

Maybe Ethernet is the way to go... :-)
  (and then perhaps 10G, but that even more rare and more expensive)

Joe M.

On 1/2/2021 7:17 PM, Dale Elshoff WB8CJW wrote:
> USB B connectors are more robust in my opinion.  Unfortunately most of
> the equipment I have uses the standard-A connectors and after a couple
> months start to have intermittencies from contact oxidation, I'm
> guessing. Windows gives the disconnect/connect alert if I look at them
> the wrong way.  A couple drops of contact cleaner works wonders. 👀
>
>
> On 1/2/2021 6:28 PM, jdow wrote:
>> On 20210102 12:01:12, Martin Smith via groups.io wrote:
>>> On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 07:27 PM, BryonB wrote:
>>>> What I'd *really* like is:
>>>> - bigger and sturdier USB type B female ("square-ish" connector)
>>> That would make is less attractive to many by lowering reliability (~27+ years of use, if connected/disconnected once a day, down to ~4+ years).
>>>
>>> Standard USB has a minimum rated lifetime of 1,500 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Mini-USB receptacle has a minimum rated lifetime of 5,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> Micro-USB and USB-C receptacles have a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal
>>> (ref:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hardware#Durability  )
>>
>> Rated for and actually delivers are two completely different matters.
>> I have yet to have a B connector die. I have three each, at least,
>> dead mini and micro USB connectors. They simply cannot tolerate the
>> stresses involved. With the type B connectors the cable dies before
>> the connector.
>>
>> {^_^}
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon>
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