Date   

Re: Overcoming local noise.

diyer
 

Unfortunately, many of these power supplies do not receive any testing to see if they meet Class A or B (USA) or EU equiv standards. So they are actually illegal but of course there are bigger fish to fry than these guys.

Don


Re: [SDRSharp] Re: TV software - Which one?

kjs1982 <kjs@...>
 


Which os? If your using Linux then mine works fine with tv headend running onubutntu with the kernel upgraded to 3.10 - xbmc is used as the front-end.

For saorview you'll be fine, but if you are in the north the freeview hd multiplex and the mini mux carrying RTÉ and TG4 are dvb t2 so won't work with the rtl dongles.

Fwiw one of my dongles didn't come with the CD or aerial, some UK based sellers targeting sales at the sdr market remove them to save shipping costs (although I did get a link to download it)

On 25 Aug 2013 17:34, "Akos Czermann" <inrepertum@...> wrote:
 

Hi, 

Thanks for the reply. I'm looking for DVB-T software specifically as in Ireland we have freeview. So which software shall I get? I'd greatly appreciate a link or pointers, more precisely my other half would, as she is not so content watching spikes and a waterfall display as I am :-) 
Thanks in advance, 

Akos

PS. I use 75 ppm frequency correction, seems to work well. 


Re: [SDRSharp] Re: TV software - Which one?

EB4APL <eb4apl@...>
 

Akos,

Didn't you got a CD with your dongle? The drivers and the TV software is on it.
But probably you can't use the dongle for SDR and DVB-T on the same computer, since the programs need different drivers.  Some folks on this list have had success installing the DVB drivers using a different USB port that Zadig used for SDR, but it depends of your computer and OS and the exact reason is not clear.  I could not do it when tried that on 3 different computers.

Regards,
Ignacio EB4APL


On 25/08/2013 18:34, Akos Czermann wrote:
 
Hi, 

Thanks for the reply. I'm looking for DVB-T software specifically as in Ireland we have freeview. So which software shall I get? I'd greatly appreciate a link or pointers, more precisely my other half would, as she is not so content watching spikes and a waterfall display as I am :-) 
Thanks in advance, 

Akos

PS. I use 75 ppm frequency correction, seems to work well. 


Re: [SDRSharp] Re: TV software - Which one?

David J Taylor
 

Hi,

Thanks for the reply. I'm looking for DVB-T software specifically as in Ireland we have freeview. So which software shall I get? I'd greatly appreciate a link or pointers, more precisely my other half would, as she is not so content watching spikes and a waterfall display as I am :-)
Thanks in advance,

Akos

PS. I use 75 ppm frequency correction, seems to work well.
==================

Akos,

Software may have come with your dongle, or at least the supplier should point you to suitable software.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software written to your requirements
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...


Re: TV software - Which one?

Akos Czermann <inrepertum@...>
 

Hi, 

Thanks for the reply. I'm looking for DVB-T software specifically as in Ireland we have freeview. So which software shall I get? I'd greatly appreciate a link or pointers, more precisely my other half would, as she is not so content watching spikes and a waterfall display as I am :-) 
Thanks in advance, 

Akos

PS. I use 75 ppm frequency correction, seems to work well. 


Re: TV signal viewing?

Alberto I2PHD
 

On 8/25/2013 4:35 PM, s.lloydhughes@... wrote:

Remember there is DVB-T2 transmissions here in the UK. Which is likely to
replace DVB-T in a few years time. As they provide more capacity per multiplex.

I asked a local radio and TV reseller here, and he told me that almost all new
TV sets are already equipped with a T2-compliant decoder.

--
73 Alberto I2PHD


Re: [SDRSharp] Overcoming local noise.

Martin <kb0hae@...>
 

Hi Chris. Did you order a generic power supply, or an HP brand replacement? I had a similar experience when I bought a generic supply as a spare for my IBM T43. I got rid of it and got an original IBM supply. No noise from the IBM supplies.

Poorly designed switch mode power supplies are a real problem these days. Many electronic devices including some wireless (WiFi) routers use these RF noise generators. I have many CFL bulbs, none cause interference unless they are less than 6 inches from an antenna. I have read that plasma TVs and many newer furnaces cause a lot of interference too.

I have managed to eliminate most of the noise sources here, and my neighbors are farther away than in most local areas here. Turning things off is not enough. You need to unplug things, since many devices have noisy internal power supplies that are not turned off by the power switch. Do this one thing at a time, leaving things unplugged as you go until you find the culprit.

In the case of external supplies, sometimes you can replace a switch mode supply with a non-switching supply. I managed to find Netgear routers (one as a spare) that have non-switching supplies. Previous routers had very noisy switching supplies.

ttyl

On 08/24/2013 11:46 PM, feralmet wrote:

A few days ago, the 18.5 volt power pack for my HP 311 notebook
failed, so I ordered a new one. The new power pack obliterated radio
reception all over the house, and even interfered with FM radio
broadcasts received on a good outdoor co-ax fed antenna. No amount of
filtration with ferrite blocks or mains filters made any difference.

Things are just going from bad to worse with some of these
switch-mode power supplies.

Other notable noise sources are the charger for my electric bike and
my variable heat soldering iron. Low wattage flouro lamps were a
problem sometimes too, but I have replaced those with LED globes and
they seem to be silent.

So what I am saying is that it's worth investigating possible noise
sources by turning things off around the house. In my case it was
causing considerable de-sensitisation of the dongle, both on VHF and
HF (with HamItUp upconverter).

Hope this might help a newbie or two....

Cheers, Chris VK3CJS




------------------------------------

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--

CUL8R

KBOHAE kb0hae@... Martin Campbell
A Satisfied Aptosid Linux user! To get Aptosid go to: www.aptosid.com
"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little
Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." Benjamin
Franklin (1818). Best privacy policy: Never Ever entrust your data to
anyone but yourself!!!


Re: [SDRSharp]

Philip Jones <pjsl196467@...>
 

while using sdr# I found my cordless mouse operates on a frequency of 27.036 mhz


Re: [SDRSharp] Re: TV signal viewing?

s.lloydhughes@btopenworld.com
 

Remember there is DVB-T2 transmissions here in the UK. Which is likely to replace DVB-T in a few years time. As they provide more capacity per multiplex.

Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



From: josephrot ;
To: ;
Subject: [SDRSharp] Re: TV signal viewing?
Sent: Sat, Aug 24, 2013 3:37:54 PM

NOT trying to be picky...

However, there are four major standards used today worldwide or by certain countries and locations:

DVB-T
ATSC
ISDB-T
DTMB

The first two are the more popular, and all are in active use.

Joe


--- In SDRSharp@..., MCH wrote:
>
> Just responding in kind. I was able to connect the dots that the guy was
> not asking if the DVB-T receiver can receive DVB-T which leaves ATSC as
> the only digital TV mode left. It isn't an epiphany that ruling out the
> inane leaves ATSC.
>
> No, the original post didn't specify ATSC, but it was implied unless you
> consider the poster an idiot. I prefer to believe people are not idiots,
> but obviously there are differing views out there.
>
(  snipped for brevity )



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Re: [SDRSharp] Re: TV signal viewing?

Siegfried Jackstien
 

HA HA .... thanks for the flowers :-)

Nice compliment

Dg9bfc

Sigi

-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: SDRSharp@... [mailto:SDRSharp@...] Im
Auftrag von jdow
Gesendet: Samstag, 24. August 2013 21:46
An: SDRSharp@...
Betreff: Re: [SDRSharp] Re: TV signal viewing?



Near Bremen. And he's not bad looking in a youngish sort of way.

{^_-}

On 2013/08/24 08:29, josephrot wrote:
Thank you for the information, but where is "here", location wise ?

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@... <mailto:SDRSharp%40yahoogroups.co.uk>
, "siegfried jackstien" <siegfried.jackstien@...> wrote:


Switching back and forth is annoying.

{^_^}
Here switching back and forth just takes using another (different) usb
port

Plug and pray :-)

Dg9bfc

Sigi


Re: [SDRSharp] TV signal viewing?

Siegfried Jackstien
 

But you are sitting close to your pc ... why you have to walk to another
room when changing the usb port??? I sit in front of the pc and plugging in
in a different usb port is easy (no need to walk to next room) ... even if I
had the stick in the attic (with a very long cable) I would not need to walk
to the attic when I wanna use a different port ... plug and pray

My windows "remembers" on what port I installed the zadig drivers and on
what port not ... so ... when using the port where the driver...bla bla ...
you know what I wanna say...

I even can use the original soft AND sdrsharp "together" when using 2
dongles and 2 usb ports (one with changed driver and the other with the
original driver) ...

But for that my pc is somewhat slow :-) (... it works with some dropouts)

Dg9bfc

Sigi

-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: SDRSharp@... [mailto:SDRSharp@...] Im
Auftrag von jdow
Gesendet: Samstag, 24. August 2013 21:44
An: SDRSharp@...
Betreff: Re: AW: [SDRSharp] TV signal viewing?



Even that is annoying when the dongle is in another room to get it away
from the computer noise. And on Win 7 all I need to do is plug in the
dongle anywhere and it is found and speaks to rtlsdr.dll automagically.

{^_^}

On 2013/08/24 07:32, siegfried jackstien wrote:

Switching back and forth is annoying.

{^_^}
Here switching back and forth just takes using another (different) usb
port

Plug and pray :-)

Dg9bfc

Sigi




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Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Overcoming local noise.

Philip Jones <pjsl196467@...>
 

though I haven't noticed it on sdr my freeview dvb box obliterated the low to mid hf bands on my Eton g3 reciever I have only got 2 sockets in my room so I have to use extension cables to run everything which adds to the noise


Re: Overcoming local noise.

kevjs1982 <kjs@...>
 

And for other newbies like myself who are getting started by simply connecting to the TV aerial** via a setback booster (used for splitting the incoming signal 6* ways here) the signal booster kills dead any signal above around 950 - you are better using the supplied aerial for things like ADS-B (actually I'm using the one supplied with a PCTV Nova 290e DVB-T2 tuner as the build quality is at least half decent***).

Oh, and if your aerial cable happens to be trailing over a USB FM transmitter set to 90MHz make sure you turn it off / move them at least 30 cm apart otherwise you'll wonder why there is a WFM signal every 90MHz!

* TV and AV Amp via a diplexer, 4 USB DVB-T Tuners on my media centre, the SDR dongle.

** The horror, I know! They certainly are not too good outside the TV bands, you really need a proper aerial - just about hangs on as far as commercial and BBC radio above 93FM (i.e. I can get Radio 4 from Belmont but the stronger signal from Sutton Coldfield is very noisy and no chance of Radio 2 and 3) but seams to pick up a lot of air-band stuff too.

*** gets me about a dozen flights at a time, stuff flying into East Midlands airport remains while I can see/here the planes but then vanishes when they are about 8km from the runway (about 12km ESE here) - stuff in the sky tends to be planes flying over the M62 corridor, not much from the south at all.

--- In SDRSharp@..., "feralmet" <feralmet@...> wrote:

I have noticed a few newbies reporting poor and "washed out" reception. Of course a good antenna is a must and on HF using an upconverter, a pre-selector (or antenna tuner) can help too.

I have a variety of old computers, both laptop and desktop, and have had great fun trying them all out with SDRSharp and HDSDR.

A few days ago, the 18.5 volt power pack for my HP 311 notebook failed, so I ordered a new one. The new power pack obliterated radio reception all over the house, and even interfered with FM radio broadcasts received on a good outdoor co-ax fed antenna. No amount of filtration with ferrite blocks or mains filters made any difference.

Things are just going from bad to worse with some of these switch-mode power supplies.

Other notable noise sources are the charger for my electric bike and my variable heat soldering iron. Low wattage flouro lamps were a problem sometimes too, but I have replaced those with LED globes and they seem to be silent.

So what I am saying is that it's worth investigating possible noise sources by turning things off around the house. In my case it was causing considerable de-sensitisation of the dongle, both on VHF and HF (with HamItUp upconverter).

Hope this might help a newbie or two....

Cheers, Chris VK3CJS


Re: TV software

kjs1982 <kjs@...>
 

Linux has support in the Kernel from about 3.10 or later - I'm using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS with the Kernel 3.10.1 and TV Headend as the DVB-T software - works well enough (aside from it failing to report a signal strength on any multiplex) on with my spare RTL dongle - note that it is DVB-T only so here in the UK doesn't give you access to the DVB-T2 multiplexes - they carry the HD channels across the UK and the Irish channels in Northern Ireland (outside areas covered by Saorview).

IIRC Windows Vista plugged and played the standard BDE drivers so should have been picked up by media centre (I immediately replaced with the SDR stuff so didn't actually try) but even installing the supplied software didn't give me DAB or FM like it was supposed to (one day I'll be able to access DAB from inside TVHeadend so I can schedule recordings / listen to it like I can with the DVB-T/T2/S services!).  SDR# gives me the FM services naturally.  If only SDR-J worked on 32bit windows / SDR# could decode DAB.


Re: [SDRSharp] Re: SDR Frequency Correction for RTL Dongle

jdow <jdow@...>
 

By the way - you also need to consider noise for some uses. Some of
those oscillators have worse noise characteristics than others. TCXOs
and OCXOs are all over the map in this regard. (The VCOCXO, Voltage
Control Oven Control Crystal Oscillator to coin an acronym as it's
usually abbreviated, in the HP Z3801A is unusually well constructed
for low noise, a couple orders of magnitude better than SOME other
OCXOs.) The Rb standards tend to be quite accurate and low noise as
the Rb technology, at least at the old larger sizes, is itself very
low noise. Cs standards are even worse even though their long term
accuracy is significantly (an order of magnitude or two) higher than
Rb standards. And then we get into exotica like laser excited cryogenic
clouds of Ytterbium atoms in laser traps that give one part in
one quintillion level stability. They've not measured it's frequency
well enough to transfer over to that as a standard. Er, that's one
part in 1.6 x 10-18 for those who are quintillion challenged. Erm,
it is the depreciated US quintillion not the British quintillion.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/at-work/test-and-measurement/ytterbium-clock-sets-new-stability-mark

I won't hold my breath until I can get one.

{^_-}

On 2013/08/24 23:47, josephrot wrote:
So noted. One thing the SDR world seems to "gloss over" is that most of the dongle USB units do not use TXCO oscillators -- not with some of the "...25ppm to 55ppm" specifications we see, and sometimes even seen in the higher-end SDR units.

With TXCO, one can and does get the static and over-time variance down to around 3ppm to 5ppm, which is more respectable, and the "new" line of USB dongles prelim specs seem to indicate many OEM source will be using TXCO rated oscillators -- seemingly a good sign. Ditto for some current and future up-converters.

There are even low-power consumption miniature platform OXCO's appearing that drive the static and over-time variance down to the .5ppm to 1ppm range...some the .25ppm range.

Then there's new sub-miniature secondary atomic RB reference oscillators...with the expected 10 to the minus 12+ stability.

But that's another story. Gotta love the yearn for accuracy...

"Our crystals are a cut above the ordinary"...used to be thought of as a bad technology pun.

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@..., jdow <jdow@...> wrote:

Back in the 70s I built an "online" type battery back up for a precision
5 MHz oscillator and over a period of a year got it down to where I was
seeing less than a few uS of time error accumulate over a day. It took
some really gentle tweaks.

Then I had a ham on 6 meters SSB who's suppressed carrier was 50.0985 MHz
who claimed I was wrong, even after patiently explaining to him that his
frequency is not what he measures on a frequency counter for an SSB signal.
He is supposed to keep substantially all his energy within 50.1 MHz to
54 MHz, and he wasn't. Appliance operators - bah.

{^_^} Joanne

On 2013/08/24 15:26, josephrot wrote:
Yep.

Or synthesize the frequency from one's PLL RF generator, and/or check accuracy via one's RB secondary atomic standard, an interesting art form I sometimes practice here.

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@..., jdow <jdow@> wrote:

I've been tempted to put in wee little tweakers. That way accuracy at the
edges of the spectrum display would be slightly enhanced. But, then, the
real way to do that is to synthesize 28.8 MHz from the 10 MHz from my GPS
frequency standards.

{^_-}

On 2013/08/24 14:40, Marion D. Kitchens wrote:


I have 4 dongles here. PPM corrections are all between 8 and 27 PPM. I must
be blessed again :-)
Marion
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 14:35:48 -0000 "siegfried jackstien"
<siegfried.jackstien@ <mailto:siegfried.jackstien@>> writes:

I have six dongles (all with r820t) ... all are between 50 and 70 ppm

And I also have 5 e4k dongles ... also around 50 to 70 ppm

Dg9bfc

Sigi



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: [SDRSharp] Re: SDR Frequency Correction for RTL Dongle

jdow <jdow@...>
 

Sir, I have VERY loudly and some say abrasively commented on the floor
sweepings for crystals that tend to get used in these dongles. Actually,
they are good enough for DVB decoding, probably. But they are pretty
junky by AT cut crystal standards.

And when you have two crystals involved, both the cheap consumer grade
100 ppm sort of crystal with an IF at 60 to 130 MHz AND 1 ppm steps for
the frequency compensation on the dongles, figure accuracy "ain't so
good". You'll have a minimum error setting the dongle up of 3 ppm. All
the relatively accurate frequencies for FM or AM signals are specified
at about 2 ppm themselves. And you can only set to 1 ppm. So somewhere
around 2.5 to 3 ppm is the likely dongle frequency accuracy. That's
150 Hz (60 MHz 2.5ppm) to 390 Hz (130 MHz 3ppm.) So pretuning to a
PSK31 transmission on say 20 Meters means you'll be within about 10
signal bandwidths of where you think you are.

If yer fussy, spend the money and do it right. For what they do these
are splendid toys that can be bent into a level of apparent precision
that's amazing. (I have an argument about his displays. But I do note
that Leif, the author of Linrad has achieved performance out of the
dongles that's outstanding in terms hams usually need for non-calibration
tasks such as easily and unambiguously quantifying spurious emissions.
His spectrum display has characteristics that make it "almost" a real
S-Meter.)

{^_-} Joanne

On 2013/08/24 23:47, josephrot wrote:
So noted. One thing the SDR world seems to "gloss over" is that most of the dongle USB units do not use TXCO oscillators -- not with some of the "...25ppm to 55ppm" specifications we see, and sometimes even seen in the higher-end SDR units.

With TXCO, one can and does get the static and over-time variance down to around 3ppm to 5ppm, which is more respectable, and the "new" line of USB dongles prelim specs seem to indicate many OEM source will be using TXCO rated oscillators -- seemingly a good sign. Ditto for some current and future up-converters.

There are even low-power consumption miniature platform OXCO's appearing that drive the static and over-time variance down to the .5ppm to 1ppm range...some the .25ppm range.

Then there's new sub-miniature secondary atomic RB reference oscillators...with the expected 10 to the minus 12+ stability.

But that's another story. Gotta love the yearn for accuracy...

"Our crystals are a cut above the ordinary"...used to be thought of as a bad technology pun.

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@..., jdow <jdow@...> wrote:

Back in the 70s I built an "online" type battery back up for a precision
5 MHz oscillator and over a period of a year got it down to where I was
seeing less than a few uS of time error accumulate over a day. It took
some really gentle tweaks.

Then I had a ham on 6 meters SSB who's suppressed carrier was 50.0985 MHz
who claimed I was wrong, even after patiently explaining to him that his
frequency is not what he measures on a frequency counter for an SSB signal.
He is supposed to keep substantially all his energy within 50.1 MHz to
54 MHz, and he wasn't. Appliance operators - bah.

{^_^} Joanne

On 2013/08/24 15:26, josephrot wrote:
Yep.

Or synthesize the frequency from one's PLL RF generator, and/or check accuracy via one's RB secondary atomic standard, an interesting art form I sometimes practice here.

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@..., jdow <jdow@> wrote:

I've been tempted to put in wee little tweakers. That way accuracy at the
edges of the spectrum display would be slightly enhanced. But, then, the
real way to do that is to synthesize 28.8 MHz from the 10 MHz from my GPS
frequency standards.

{^_-}

On 2013/08/24 14:40, Marion D. Kitchens wrote:


I have 4 dongles here. PPM corrections are all between 8 and 27 PPM. I must
be blessed again :-)
Marion
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 14:35:48 -0000 "siegfried jackstien"
<siegfried.jackstien@ <mailto:siegfried.jackstien@>> writes:

I have six dongles (all with r820t) ... all are between 50 and 70 ppm

And I also have 5 e4k dongles ... also around 50 to 70 ppm

Dg9bfc

Sigi



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: SDR Frequency Correction for RTL Dongle

josephrot
 

So noted. One thing the SDR world seems to "gloss over" is that most of the dongle USB units do not use TXCO oscillators -- not with some of the "...25ppm to 55ppm" specifications we see, and sometimes even seen in the higher-end SDR units.

With TXCO, one can and does get the static and over-time variance down to around 3ppm to 5ppm, which is more respectable, and the "new" line of USB dongles prelim specs seem to indicate many OEM source will be using TXCO rated oscillators -- seemingly a good sign. Ditto for some current and future up-converters.

There are even low-power consumption miniature platform OXCO's appearing that drive the static and over-time variance down to the .5ppm to 1ppm range...some the .25ppm range.

Then there's new sub-miniature secondary atomic RB reference oscillators...with the expected 10 to the minus 12+ stability.

But that's another story. Gotta love the yearn for accuracy...

"Our crystals are a cut above the ordinary"...used to be thought of as a bad technology pun.

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@..., jdow <jdow@...> wrote:

Back in the 70s I built an "online" type battery back up for a precision
5 MHz oscillator and over a period of a year got it down to where I was
seeing less than a few uS of time error accumulate over a day. It took
some really gentle tweaks.

Then I had a ham on 6 meters SSB who's suppressed carrier was 50.0985 MHz
who claimed I was wrong, even after patiently explaining to him that his
frequency is not what he measures on a frequency counter for an SSB signal.
He is supposed to keep substantially all his energy within 50.1 MHz to
54 MHz, and he wasn't. Appliance operators - bah.

{^_^} Joanne

On 2013/08/24 15:26, josephrot wrote:
Yep.

Or synthesize the frequency from one's PLL RF generator, and/or check accuracy via one's RB secondary atomic standard, an interesting art form I sometimes practice here.

Joe

--- In SDRSharp@..., jdow <jdow@> wrote:

I've been tempted to put in wee little tweakers. That way accuracy at the
edges of the spectrum display would be slightly enhanced. But, then, the
real way to do that is to synthesize 28.8 MHz from the 10 MHz from my GPS
frequency standards.

{^_-}

On 2013/08/24 14:40, Marion D. Kitchens wrote:


I have 4 dongles here. PPM corrections are all between 8 and 27 PPM. I must
be blessed again :-)
Marion
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 14:35:48 -0000 "siegfried jackstien"
<siegfried.jackstien@ <mailto:siegfried.jackstien@>> writes:

I have six dongles (all with r820t) ... all are between 50 and 70 ppm

And I also have 5 e4k dongles ... also around 50 to 70 ppm

Dg9bfc

Sigi


Overcoming local noise.

feralmet
 

I have noticed a few newbies reporting poor and "washed out" reception. Of course a good antenna is a must and on HF using an upconverter, a pre-selector (or antenna tuner) can help too.

I have a variety of old computers, both laptop and desktop, and have had great fun trying them all out with SDRSharp and HDSDR.

A few days ago, the 18.5 volt power pack for my HP 311 notebook failed, so I ordered a new one. The new power pack obliterated radio reception all over the house, and even interfered with FM radio broadcasts received on a good outdoor co-ax fed antenna. No amount of filtration with ferrite blocks or mains filters made any difference.

Things are just going from bad to worse with some of these switch-mode power supplies.

Other notable noise sources are the charger for my electric bike and my variable heat soldering iron. Low wattage flouro lamps were a problem sometimes too, but I have replaced those with LED globes and they seem to be silent.

So what I am saying is that it's worth investigating possible noise sources by turning things off around the house. In my case it was causing considerable de-sensitisation of the dongle, both on VHF and HF (with HamItUp upconverter).

Hope this might help a newbie or two....

Cheers, Chris VK3CJS


Re: [SDRSharp] TV software

jdow <jdow@...>
 

Technically "analog" is better usage. NTSC standards (29.97 etc) are used
over digital TV in the US almost exclusively.

That has the sad property of making image fields take a variable number of
sound samples. I had to be careful with that with the Matrox DSX cards I
worked with for several years.

{^_-}

On 2013/08/24 17:51, MCH wrote:
DVB-T SW should have came with your dongle.

NTSC is available with TVsharp.

Anything else is not available AFAIK.

Joe M.

Akos Czermann wrote:


Hi,

i have a Nooelec Newsky 820T, where can I download the sw for TV?

Many thanks from a newbie,

Akos

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: [SDRSharp] TV software

Joe M.
 

DVB-T SW should have came with your dongle.

NTSC is available with TVsharp.

Anything else is not available AFAIK.

Joe M.

Akos Czermann wrote:

Hi, i have a Nooelec Newsky 820T, where can I download the sw for TV?
Many thanks from a newbie, Akos