Date   

Re: If you like SDR#, Don't Pirate SDR#

prog
 

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 01:25 PM, Brian Gregory wrote:

What do you regard as a decent AV then?

I've just given up with Malwarebytes since they seem incapable of releasing something that doesn't break lots of other things on my PC.

Most people say just use Microsoft because they at least have some idea how to hook into Windows without breaking other stuff.

It seems that the instructions Microsoft gave me to force a virus database update when I reported spyserver.exe as a false positive were wrong and actually left me with a corrupt virus database. But I've fixed it now by doing

MpCmdRun.exe -RemoveDefinitions -All

and rebooting immediately afterwards.

I use Kaspersky since a few years.


Where is Spyserver.exe? #sdrsharp #spyserver

Pekka Sorjonen
 

Title says it. Can not find it.

73´s
Pekka


Re: If you like SDR#, Don't Pirate SDR#

Brian Gregory <bdgregory@...>
 

What do you regard as a decent AV then?

I've just given up with Malwarebytes since they seem incapable of releasing something that doesn't break lots of other things on my PC.

Most people say just use Microsoft because they at least have some idea how to hook into Windows without breaking other stuff.

It seems that the instructions Microsoft gave me to force a virus database update when I reported spyserver.exe as a false positive were wrong and actually left me with a corrupt virus database. But I've fixed it now by doing

MpCmdRun.exe -RemoveDefinitions -All

and rebooting immediately afterwards.

Brian Gregory.
bdgregory@...
www.Brian-Gregory.me.uk
(Home)
On 16/10/2020 08:00, prog wrote:

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 10:07 PM, Brian Gregory wrote:
This pirating of SDR#?
 
It must be someone who works at Microsoft.
 
More and more bits of the revised less piratable SDR# keep getting quarantined by Microsoft AV!
It's ridiculous.
I just lost SDRSharp.exe because Microsoft quarantined it!!
False positive. Get a decent antivirus.


Re: If you like SDR#, Don't Pirate SDR#

Alberto I2PHD
 

On 2020-10-16 6:28, jdow wrote:
You can tell all AVs I've ever used to leave specific files or folders alone. I use that quite often. It is so bad that my entire development tree is "leave me alone." I pull files I might share out of there and test them from time to time as a check.

Another possibility is to not use an anti-virus software at all..... I stopped using Kaspersky a couple of years ago, and my PC is completely clean, as testified by MalwareBytes Anti Malware and other scanning tools which I run from time to time, despite running Windows as administrator, with the bl**dy UAC completely turned off.

You should act as the anti-virus yourself...  just pay attention to the Web sites you visit, don't blindly click here and there, and wash your mail with Mail Washer before opening your email client, in my case Thunderbird.  Only the unwary get infected.... 

--
73 Alberto I2PHD
<<< http://www.weaksignals.com >>>



Re: New SDR# AM co-channel interference canceller

jdow
 

I should dig out some notes from the late 70s I took with regards to my thinking and experimenting with that concept. It should do in any patents that are still unexpired. (In the US it appears patents last 17 years from grant or 20 years from application per owner's choice. So 1999 sounds like either prior art to revoke a patent or long enough the patent is surely dead.)

{o.o}

On 20201016 01:17:31, Simon Brown wrote:

FWIW

 

"Tune SSB Automatically", Robert Dick, QEX, January 1999, pp 9-18 may possibly be patented , I remember seeing articles for very similar technology which certainly are patented.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io> On Behalf Of h. garcia
Sent: 16 October 2020 06:48
To: airspy@groups.io
Subject: [airspy] New SDR# AM co-channel interference canceller

 

Hi prog, everyone,

 

prog, I'm completely amazed with the results you shared Twitter of the new AM co-channel interference canceller (links below). Awesome results!!!

 

I wonder if you could also explain a bit what's the basic signal processing or physical properties used to achieve such good results. I wonder if your work is a distant relative of phenomena described on the article "Tune SSB Automatically", Robert Dick, QEX, January 1999, pp 9-18 (kudos to Simon Brown to bring the article to this list back on July/2017. The article is attached, and Robert explained he discovered the SSB auto-tuning while researching on voice-over-voice interference mitigation.

 

 

 



Re: New SDR# AM co-channel interference canceller

Simon Brown
 

FWIW

 

"Tune SSB Automatically", Robert Dick, QEX, January 1999, pp 9-18 may possibly be patented , I remember seeing articles for very similar technology which certainly are patented.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io> On Behalf Of h. garcia
Sent: 16 October 2020 06:48
To: airspy@groups.io
Subject: [airspy] New SDR# AM co-channel interference canceller

 

Hi prog, everyone,

 

prog, I'm completely amazed with the results you shared Twitter of the new AM co-channel interference canceller (links below). Awesome results!!!

 

I wonder if you could also explain a bit what's the basic signal processing or physical properties used to achieve such good results. I wonder if your work is a distant relative of phenomena described on the article "Tune SSB Automatically", Robert Dick, QEX, January 1999, pp 9-18 (kudos to Simon Brown to bring the article to this list back on July/2017. The article is attached, and Robert explained he discovered the SSB auto-tuning while researching on voice-over-voice interference mitigation.

 

 

 


Re: If you like SDR#, Don't Pirate SDR#

prog
 

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 10:07 PM, Brian Gregory wrote:
This pirating of SDR#?
 
It must be someone who works at Microsoft.
 
More and more bits of the revised less piratable SDR# keep getting quarantined by Microsoft AV!
It's ridiculous.
I just lost SDRSharp.exe because Microsoft quarantined it!!
False positive. Get a decent antivirus.


New SDR# AM co-channel interference canceller

h. garcia
 

Hi prog, everyone,

prog, I'm completely amazed with the results you shared Twitter of the new AM co-channel interference canceller (links below). Awesome results!!!

I wonder if you could also explain a bit what's the basic signal processing or physical properties used to achieve such good results. I wonder if your work is a distant relative of phenomena described on the article "Tune SSB Automatically", Robert Dick, QEX, January 1999, pp 9-18 (kudos to Simon Brown to bring the article to this list back on July/2017. The article is attached, and Robert explained he discovered the SSB auto-tuning while researching on voice-over-voice interference mitigation.




Re: Basic FLARM or OGN monitor

LA7NO
 

Thanks, Martin,

This was a bit helpful.
And the code is actually quite readable without comments.

I assume there is a document that describes how the Airspy is supposed to be controlled via software, but so far I could not find any.
Maybe looking at the chipset documentation could help. Will look further.

P-T


Re: If you like SDR#, Don't Pirate SDR#

jdow
 

You can tell all AVs I've ever used to leave specific files or folders alone. I use that quite often. It is so bad that my entire development tree is "leave me alone." I pull files I might share out of there and test them from time to time as a check.

{^_^}

On 20201015 13:07:15, Brian Gregory wrote:
This pirating of SDR#?

It must be someone who works at Microsoft.

More and more bits of the revised less piratable SDR# keep getting quarantined by Microsoft AV!
It's ridiculous.
I just lost SDRSharp.exe because Microsoft quarantined it!!


On Sun, 20 Sep 2020 at 12:39, prog <info@...> wrote:
Here we go again with a campaign of piracy for third party hardware. The last time this happened, we decided to restrict the SDR# innovations to our own hardware and a select list of partners. Now things just went savage, which will push the restrictions even further, which is unfortunate for our community.
Some end users even brag about their ability to use pirated software like if there was no tomorrow. I ask you to have some decency.
Finally, whoever writes the pirated dlls: Don't be someone else's fool. The IP law is not forgiving and a big dossier is being built. We know who you are.


--


Re: Basic FLARM or OGN monitor

Martin Smith
 

The important bits to understand are probably from line 848 down to line 1086, which is only 238 line of code to understand how to initialise the device, access devices via their serial number, set gains, set sample rate, tune the frequency, and receive samples via a callback function and finally how to stop receiving samples, and close the device.
https://github.com/airspy/airspyone_host/blob/master/airspy-tools/src/airspy_rx.c#L848 is most of the important code.

https://github.com/airspy/airspyone_host/blob/master/airspy-tools/src/airspy_rx.c#L362 is the rx_callback function (which needs to exit before the next block of samples arrive from the device)

To me looking at the code, it is the documentation.


Re: If you like SDR#, Don't Pirate SDR#

Brian Gregory <bdgregory@...>
 

This pirating of SDR#?

It must be someone who works at Microsoft.

More and more bits of the revised less piratable SDR# keep getting quarantined by Microsoft AV!
It's ridiculous.
I just lost SDRSharp.exe because Microsoft quarantined it!!


On Sun, 20 Sep 2020 at 12:39, prog <info@...> wrote:
Here we go again with a campaign of piracy for third party hardware. The last time this happened, we decided to restrict the SDR# innovations to our own hardware and a select list of partners. Now things just went savage, which will push the restrictions even further, which is unfortunate for our community.
Some end users even brag about their ability to use pirated software like if there was no tomorrow. I ask you to have some decency.
Finally, whoever writes the pirated dlls: Don't be someone else's fool. The IP law is not forgiving and a big dossier is being built. We know who you are.




Re: Basic FLARM or OGN monitor

LA7NO
 

I am looking for something much more basic, and also well commented.
Maybe parts of this file could be helpful.
Are there some detailed explanations of the way it works?

P-T


Re: Basic FLARM or OGN monitor

Martin Smith
 


Basic FLARM or OGN monitor

LA7NO
 

Hello Group,

I am interested in developing a very basic application that can receive and display the data packets transmitted by the FLARM and/or OGN systems in the 868.2 – 868.4 MHz band.
Would like to use a Windows PC. Preferably programming in Visual C or Python.

Does anyone know of some sample code that does the most basic low-level stuff in accessing the USB port and picking up the data-stream from the AIRSPY?

Per-Tore


Re: Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

Simon Brown
 

Hi,

 

I use DirectX/Disrect2D for controls which update regularly or benefit from the better quality tessellation; mainly Spectrum, Waterfall, Signal History and similar. GDI/GDI+ doesn’t use hardware acceleration whereas DirectX does.

 

Although there’s a different learning curve it’s well worth it, CPU load can be < 0.5% when running the full console with the HF+.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io> On Behalf Of jdow

Didn't you have to redesign all the gui elements? Or is the DirectX part only in the spectrum stuff?

{^_^}


Re: Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

jdow
 

Didn't you have to redesign all the gui elements? Or is the DirectX part only in the spectrum stuff?

{^_^}

On 20201014 13:38:18, Simon Brown wrote:

No,

 

Just a few lines. DirectX is designed for multi-threaded programming.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io> On Behalf Of jdow
Sent: 14 October 2020 11:43
To: airspy@groups.io
Subject: Re: [airspy] Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

 

 

On 20201014 03:37:33, Simon Brown wrote:

UI

If you use DirectX / Direct2D then you can write an application which uses multiple threads for the UI, essential for gaming. I assume the same is true with OpenGL.


I bet that is a boatload of code.




Re: Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

jdow
 

Which part of Rockwell and which computer are both questions. It may have been one of the subdivisions Rockwell bought. There was some bragging about the (supposed?) feat floating around the company and reached my semi-black-world department. And it might have been the shuttle. The people doing satellite "stuff" for NASA got us all into trouble repeatedly by their philosophy "It's all government money so what the heck why do we worry about which project we charge for this work?"
(pause for lots of reading.)
Yes, it was the shuttle. Not it was not 3 computers it was 5 overall. Four had the same software load (IBM) and the backup computer, number five, programmed by Rockwell using time slice rather than priority scheduling. Apparently what I heard indicates Rockwell's version used less memory and had fewer problems. I am not at all sure whether the Autonetics (aka Rockwell) D232 computer was used for #5 or not. If what I remember is correct then the Autonetics computer was also used in case there was a systematic hardware or software problem in the primary computers.

{^_^}

On 20201014 06:46:43, n2msqrp wrote:
Which computer are you talking about?

The Apollo Guidance Computer, AGC, was designed by the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory and manufactured by Delco Electronics:


This is the computer Phil is referring to for Apollo 11.

I've attended lectures by Frank O'Brien on the AGC.  He did not mention any  involvement by Rockwell


The Saturn Launch Vehicle Computer was designed and built by IBM:


I haven't read any involvement by Rockwell with this system.

Could you have been referring to the computer used by the Space Shuttle since Rockwell was the prime contractor for the vehicle:


Mike N2MS


On 10/14/2020 5:40 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:


Apollo trivia I learned at Rockwell. Rockwell made the third computer for the Apollo capsule. IBM made the other two. Rockwell's apparently was somewhat better. I forget whether it was size or power. It ran without glitches, which the IBM machines had - as a rebuild of an Apollo computer some one up North helped manage to get running. In the process of bug hunting to repair it they found a subtle timing error. It's all up on YouTube.



Re: Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

Simon Brown
 

No,

 

Just a few lines. DirectX is designed for multi-threaded programming.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: airspy@groups.io <airspy@groups.io> On Behalf Of jdow
Sent: 14 October 2020 11:43
To: airspy@groups.io
Subject: Re: [airspy] Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

 

 

On 20201014 03:37:33, Simon Brown wrote:

UI

If you use DirectX / Direct2D then you can write an application which uses multiple threads for the UI, essential for gaming. I assume the same is true with OpenGL.


I bet that is a boatload of code.



Re: Spyserver, full IQ and multiple users

N2MS
 

Which computer are you talking about?

The Apollo Guidance Computer, AGC, was designed by the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory and manufactured by Delco Electronics:


This is the computer Phil is referring to for Apollo 11.

I've attended lectures by Frank O'Brien on the AGC.  He did not mention any  involvement by Rockwell

<https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/franko.html>

The Saturn Launch Vehicle Computer was designed and built by IBM:


I haven't read any involvement by Rockwell with this system.

Could you have been referring to the computer used by the Space Shuttle since Rockwell was the prime contractor for the vehicle:


Mike N2MS


On 10/14/2020 5:40 AM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:


   

Apollo trivia I learned at Rockwell. Rockwell made the third computer for the Apollo capsule. IBM made the other two. Rockwell's apparently was somewhat better. I forget whether it was size or power. It ran without glitches, which the IBM machines had - as a rebuild of an Apollo computer some one up North helped manage to get running. In the process of bug hunting to repair it they found a subtle timing error. It's all up on YouTube.


    

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