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Upcoming SpaceX Mission

Clint Bradford
 

From ARISS ...

The spouse of ARISS Hardware team member Ed Krome, K9EK, pointed out that the ARISS next generation radio system (InterOperable Radio System--IORS) is prominently described as a primary payload (note:  not secondary) on the SpaceX CRS-20 mission which will be launched no earlier than March 6(ET).
See the Wikipedia URL:  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpaceX_CRS-20.




The ARISS Team wants to express our heartfelt thanks to all of you that have contributed to helping us realize this major milestone.  



It should be noted that the ARISS hardware team is still very busy on IORS
development and final certification.  While certified for launch and stowage
on ISS,  are still in deep into the final certification of the IORS for
flight operations.  Also, our build of the second flight unit is in progress
in Florida and San Diego.  So while CRS-20 represents the launch of SN
1001-our first flight unit--it also represents the beginning of the "ARISS
factory build" and certification of all 10 units.  



ARISS-helping AMSAT and all our partners keep Amateur Radio in Space!  

Note:  November 13, 2020 will represent the 20th year of ARISS continuous
amateur radio operation on ISS!!



73,  Frank KA3HDO

--------------------------------------------

Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO

ISS Ham Radio Program Manager & PI

ARISS International Chair

AMSAT V.P. for Human Spaceflight Programs

Clint Bradford
 

  March 07, 2020 
RELEASE 20-023
SpaceX Dragon Heads to Space Station with NASA Science, Cargo
SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft launches on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40
SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft launches on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 11:50 p.m. EST March 6, 2020. Dragon will deliver more than 4,300 pounds of NASA cargo and science investigations to the International Space Station, including a new science facility scheduled to be installed to the outside of the station during a spacewalk this spring.
Credits: NASA Television

A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station after launching at 11:50 p.m. EST Friday. Dragon will deliver more than 4,300 pounds of NASA cargo and science investigations, including a new science facility scheduled to be installed to the outside of the station during a spacewalk this spring.

 

The spacecraft launched on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and is scheduled to arrive at the orbital outpost on Monday, March 9. Coverage of the spacecraft’s approach and arrival at the space station will begin at 5:30 a.m. EDT on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

 

Dragon will join three other spacecraft currently at the station. When it arrives, NASA Flight Engineer Andrew Morgan will grapple Dragon, backed up by NASA’s Jessica Meir. Coverage of robotic installation to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module will begin at 8:30 a.m.

 

Dragon is scheduled to remain at the space station until April 9, when the spacecraft will return to Earth with research and cargo.

 

This delivery, SpaceX’s 20th cargo flight to the space station under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract, will support dozens of new and existing investigations. NASA’s research and development work aboard the space station contributes to the agency’s deep space exploration plans, including future Moon and Mars missions.

 

Here are details about some of the scientific investigations Dragon is delivering:

 

New Facility Outside the Space Station

The Bartolomeo facility, created by ESA (European Space Agency) and Airbus, attaches to the exterior of the European Columbus Module. Designed to provide new scientific opportunities on the outside of the space station for commercial and institutional users, the facility offers unobstructed views both toward Earth and into space. Potential applications include Earth observation, robotics, material science and astrophysics.

 

Studying the Human Intestine On a Chip

Organ-Chips as a Platform for Studying Effects of Space on Human Enteric Physiology (Gut on Chip) examines the effect of microgravity and other space-related stress factors on biotechnology company Emulate’s human innervated Intestine-Chip (hiIC). This Organ-Chip device enables the study of organ physiology and diseases in a laboratory setting. It allows for automated maintenance, including imaging, sampling, and storage on orbit and data downlink for molecular analysis on Earth.

 

Growing Human Heart Cells

Generation of Cardiomyocytes From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiac Progenitors Expanded in Microgravity (MVP Cell-03) examines whether microgravity increases the production of heart cells from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The investigation induces stem cells to generate heart precursor cells and cultures those cells on the space station to analyze and compare with cultures grown on Earth.

 

These are just a few of the hundreds of investigations providing opportunities for U.S. government agencies, private industry, and academic and research institutions to conduct microgravity research that leads to new technologies, medical treatments and products that improve life on Earth. Conducting science aboard the orbiting laboratory will help us learn how to keep astronauts healthy during long-duration space travel and demonstrate technologies for future human and robotic exploration beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars.

 

For almost 20 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the International Space Station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. As a global endeavor, 239 people from 19 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 2,800 research investigations from researchers in 108 countries.

 

For more information about the International Space Station, its research, and crew, visit:

 

https://www.nasa.gov/station

 

-end-

 

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Headquarters, Washington
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Courtney Beasley
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
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