Topics

QSL Cards, LOTW

Clint Bradford
 

While watching a visible-to-the-naked eye pass of the ISS last night, a 
friend asked me about the ARRL "LoTW - Logbook of the World" program, 
and whether or not she should be using it.

Those who are working towards awards and certificates use LoTW, as
well as many who aren't. Mandatory for sat workers? Absolutely not.

From the ARRL:

Logbook of the World (LoTW) is an online service that enables you to

  • electronically submit contacts (QSOs) for confirmation
  • view your submitted QSOs and resulting confirmations online
  • view your DXCCVUCCWASWAZ and WPX award progress online
  • electronically submit confirmations for credit toward DXCC, VUCC, WAS, WAZ and WPX award
The more helpful submission of contacts made - and those NOT made when 
you believe it should have happened - is the LIVE OSCAR Status Page ...

http://www.amsat.org/status/

There you can see which birds have been recently worked, and those that
have not. YOUR input there is valuable not only to fellow hams, but also to 
the control operator teams involved!

What is fun is "trading" QSL cards with your contacts. If you like stamp collecting,
you'll love 
QSL cards! Amateur radio operators exchange QSL cards to confirm 
contacts with other stations. QSL cards are traditionally a graphic or photo on the
front with your callsign, then more data and a "blank form" where you can write
details of the contact, the other station and operator, and other data.

At minimum, QSL cards should both your callsign and the other station's
callsign, the time and date of the contact (state whether UTC or local time),
the frequency / band / satellite used, the mode of transmission (FM voice
for these easy birds), and a signal report.

The International Amateur Radio Union and its member societies recommend 

a maximum size for QSL cards: 3.5 x 5.5 inches.

There are several good QSL print shops ... I will post a few a little later.

Is is MANDATORY to send QSL cards to all your contacts? Absolutely not. But 
it can be fun for both you and your contacts to "trade" 'em!

Clint Bradford

PS Those who have attended my satellite presentations are told all this, by the 
way ... and have been for many years.

 

Kelly Bird <spooky1369@...>
 

GREAT Info Clint.....
THANKS for the Live Oscar Link !

73
Kelly Bird KF5DDA 


On Sat, Jun 9, 2018 at 8:56, Clint Bradford
<clintbradford@...> wrote:
While watching a visible-to-the-naked eye pass of the ISS last night, a 
friend asked me about the ARRL "LoTW - Logbook of the World" program, 
and whether or not she should be using it.

Those who are working towards awards and certificates use LoTW, as
well as many who aren't. Mandatory for sat workers? Absolutely not.

From the ARRL:

Logbook of the World (LoTW) is an online service that enables you to

  • electronically submit contacts (QSOs) for confirmation
  • view your submitted QSOs and resulting confirmations online
  • view your DXCCVUCCWASWAZ and WPX award progress online
  • electronically submit confirmations for credit toward DXCC, VUCC, WAS, WAZ and WPX award
The more helpful submission of contacts made - and those NOT made when 
you believe it should have happened - is the LIVE OSCAR Status Page ...

http://www.amsat.org/status/

There you can see which birds have been recently worked, and those that
have not. YOUR input there is valuable not only to fellow hams, but also to 
the control operator teams involved!

What is fun is "trading" QSL cards with your contacts. If you like stamp collecting,
you'll love 
QSL cards! Amateur radio operators exchange QSL cards to confirm 
contacts with other stations. QSL cards are traditionally a graphic or photo on the
front with your callsign, then more data and a "blank form" where you can write
details of the contact, the other station and operator, and other data.

At minimum, QSL cards should both your callsign and the other station's
callsign, the time and date of the contact (state whether UTC or local time),
the frequency / band / satellite used, the mode of transmission (FM voice
for these easy birds), and a signal report.

The International Amateur Radio Union and its member societies recommend 

a maximum size for QSL cards: 3.5 x 5.5 inches.

There are several good QSL print shops ... I will post a few a little later.

Is is MANDATORY to send QSL cards to all your contacts? Absolutely not. But 
it can be fun for both you and your contacts to "trade" 'em!

Clint Bradford

PS Those who have attended my satellite presentations are told all this, by the 
way ... and have been for many years.

 

tnsley@sbcglobal.net <tnsley@...>
 

I upload all contacts to LOTW and send cards when I receive them. Some will request upload to risk..done....some to qrz......done.
However you want it....done

Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE device

Clint Bradford
 

Trading cards - or making contact entries - is fun for many. Not a 
mandatory task ... and you may not want to send EVERY contact a 
card nor make an entry. 

Try LoTW and other electronic means ... and design a QSL card for 
yourself! I need to get a list of good QSL card printers ...

GROUP - Who have you used and were pleased with for making your 
QSL cards???