Topics

New SSTV from ISS Project

Clint Bradford
 

ARISS News Release No. 19-02
 
Dave Jordan, AA4KN 
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...
 
Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event 
 
Feb 2, 2019: 
 
ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 18:25 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram. 
 
When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed. 
 
Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included. Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ . 
 
Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@..., the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status. 
 
About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.
 
Also join us on Facebook: Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
 
Follow us on Twitter: ARISS_status
 
Media Contact:
Dave Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...

Clint Bradford
 

SSTV project for So CA:

swmeow@...
 

Hi Clint, this is VERY helpful! I will plug it on the nets tonight, plus your work-sats web site too!  All the best to you!   gordo


-----Original Message-----
From: Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...>
To: Work-Sat <Work-Sat@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 2:07 pm
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

SSTV project for So CA:

Clint Bradford
 

All but those last two passes “should” provide excitement for our region here in So CA!
 
And receiving those wonderful images can be as simple as holding your smartphone with a $3 app up to your HT’s speaker: NO elaborate wiring necessary for success!
 
 Software and station suggestion links right here;
 
 

Clint Bradford
 

Project transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 18:25 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC.

That’s 10:25 AM Friday Pacific time - to 10:30 AM on Sunday.

Frequency is 145.80 MHz.

SSTV mode is PD120.

Clint

Clint Bradford
 

Concerning the ARISS News Release No. 19-02 sent on Feb 3, please make note that the February 8 start time for the ARISS/NOTA SSTV Event has been changed from 18:25 UTC to 14:00 UTC. A corrected version of the original press release is below. We are sorry for any inconvenience this might have caused.
 
 
ARISS News Release                                    No. 19-02
 
Dave Jordan, AA4KN 
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...
Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event 
Feb 2, 2019: 
 
ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 14:00 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.  
 
When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.  
 
Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) 
images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included. 
 
Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ . 
 
Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@..., the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status. 
 
About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.
 
Also join us on Facebook:  Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
Follow us on Twitter:  ARISS_status
 
Media Contact:
Dave Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...

Fred Hillhouse
 

Greetings,

 

I made it out for the last pass. I had no success.

 

Interesting I hear the signal a couple of minutes into the pass and a few minutes near the end. I heard nothing in the middle.

 

I am using a D72 connected to a 1/4wave antenna (just built). It is mounted on a tripod at about a 6’ height.

The frequency is 145.800, Wideband. Squelch is open.

Passes for my location are determined by Heavens-above Pro. GPS is ON.

 

I think I read that it might be transmitting in narrow band so I hope to give it a try for my 6PM EST pass. I can’t find the reference I believe I read.

 

Last time this event was run, I was using a Diamond RH77ACA. I expect the ¼ to perform better. Last time I did receive at least some image.

 

Any hints?

 

Thanks!

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Clint Bradford via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 3:35 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

 

Concerning the ARISS News Release No. 19-02 sent on Feb 3, please make note that the February 8 start time for the ARISS/NOTA SSTV Event has been changed from 18:25 UTC to 14:00 UTC. A corrected version of the original press release is below. We are sorry for any inconvenience this might have caused.

 

 

ARISS News Release                                    No. 19-02

 

Dave Jordan, AA4KN 

ARISS PR

aa4kn@...

Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event 

Feb 2, 2019: 

 

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 14:00 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.  

 

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.  

 

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) 

images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included. 

 

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ . 

 

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@..., the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status. 

 

About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

 

Also join us on Facebook:  Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)

Follow us on Twitter:  ARISS_status

 

Media Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@...


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Clint Bradford
 

Some gaIn in the antenna will help. A tape measure beam will provide plenty!

Just heard - 5 mins ago - a SSTV transmission while driving. Project is underway!

Fred Hillhouse
 

I do realize more gain would be nice. I have a Yagi at home that needs finishing. I guess I should have brought it to work and completed it.

 

However, hearing the ISS near the beginning and near the end of the pass and not in the middle seems abby-normal. Both times the ISS was under 20 degrees. Normal at its maximum elevation.

 

My 6PM pass will have a max elevation of ~89 degrees so I do expect a null at the top from the ¼ wave antenna.

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Clint Bradford via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 2:49 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

 

Some gaIn in the antenna will help. A tape measure beam will provide plenty!

Just heard - 5 mins ago - a SSTV transmission while driving. Project is underway!


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Fred Hillhouse
 

I also wonder why it would perform remarkably worse than my 17” Diamond HT antenna. Apparently the Diamond is pretty hot!

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Hillhouse
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 3:21 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

 

I do realize more gain would be nice. I have a Yagi at home that needs finishing. I guess I should have brought it to work and completed it.

 

However, hearing the ISS near the beginning and near the end of the pass and not in the middle seems abby-normal. Both times the ISS was under 20 degrees. Normal at its maximum elevation.

 

My 6PM pass will have a max elevation of ~89 degrees so I do expect a null at the top from the ¼ wave antenna.

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Clint Bradford via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 2:49 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

 

Some gaIn in the antenna will help. A tape measure beam will provide plenty!

Just heard - 5 mins ago - a SSTV transmission while driving. Project is underway!

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Brad Smith
 

The 1/4 wave antenna has a silent “donut hole” straight up. With a low transmit and receive angle you won’t hear it directly overhead. 

KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Feb 8, 2019, at 1:25 PM, Fred Hillhouse <fmhillhouse@...> wrote:

Greetings,

 

I made it out for the last pass. I had no success.

 

Interesting I hear the signal a couple of minutes into the pass and a few minutes near the end. I heard nothing in the middle.

 

I am using a D72 connected to a 1/4wave antenna (just built). It is mounted on a tripod at about a 6’ height.

The frequency is 145.800, Wideband. Squelch is open.

Passes for my location are determined by Heavens-above Pro. GPS is ON.

 

I think I read that it might be transmitting in narrow band so I hope to give it a try for my 6PM EST pass. I can’t find the reference I believe I read.

 

Last time this event was run, I was using a Diamond RH77ACA. I expect the ¼ to perform better. Last time I did receive at least some image.

 

Any hints?

 

Thanks!

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Clint Bradford via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 3:35 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

 

Concerning the ARISS News Release No. 19-02 sent on Feb 3, please make note that the February 8 start time for the ARISS/NOTA SSTV Event has been changed from 18:25 UTC to 14:00 UTC. A corrected version of the original press release is below. We are sorry for any inconvenience this might have caused.

 

 

ARISS News Release                                    No. 19-02

 

Dave Jordan, AA4KN 

ARISS PR

Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event 

Feb 2, 2019: 

 

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 14:00 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.  

 

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.  

 

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) 

images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included. 

 

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

 

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@..., the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status. 

 

About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

 

Also join us on Facebook:  Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)

Follow us on Twitter:  ARISS_status

 

Media Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Fred Hillhouse
 

Hi Brad,

 

I am aware of the null at the top. Given that the pass I was attempting to capture peaked at 33 degrees, it should have been at least a bad picture rather than no picture.

 

For the pass at 1800EST, I expect no picture in the middle since it will be in the null.

 

I am working this from two locations (45 miles apart):

1.       Home, currently remote, RTL-SDR/Gpredict/SDR#,VB-Cable/RX-SSTV, no success

2.       Work, not remote, D72/Robot36/Heavens-AbovePro, no success

 

I appreciate the earlier gain comment and if I had a rotor that could be remotely controlled …

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

PS. This is a plot for the ¼ wave antenna with four radials. 25-30 degrees is the sweet spot.

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Smith via Groups.Io

The 1/4 wave antenna has a silent “donut hole” straight up. With a low transmit and receive angle you won’t hear it directly overhead. 

 

KC9UQR 


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Floyd Bixler
 

I saw that the ISS finished prepping and released the Cygnus module yesterday. Later, the Cygnus released a number od cubesats. I was wondering if their gear was even turned on during this time.

Floyd DA1VF/WD8DUP

IPad originated

Fred Hillhouse
 

My latest report:

 

Using my D72 and newly crafted 1/4 wave antenna, I just had a decent pass. The upper white portion is in WFM, The following green is where I gave up, I then remembered I programmed in a NFM memory and the image became real. The green band halfway through is when I went back to the VFO (WFM). I finished the image in NFM. I am happy now. Now to wait impatiently for the next pass.

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Hillhouse
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 5:06 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] New SSTV from ISS Project

 

Hi Brad,

 

I am aware of the null at the top. Given that the pass I was attempting to capture peaked at 33 degrees, it should have been at least a bad picture rather than no picture.

 

For the pass at 1800EST, I expect no picture in the middle since it will be in the null.

 

I am working this from two locations (45 miles apart):

1.      Home, currently remote, RTL-SDR/Gpredict/SDR#,VB-Cable/RX-SSTV, no success

2.      Work, not remote, D72/Robot36/Heavens-AbovePro, no success

 

I appreciate the earlier gain comment and if I had a rotor that could be remotely controlled …

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

PS. This is a plot for the ¼ wave antenna with four radials. 25-30 degrees is the sweet spot.

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Smith via Groups.Io

The 1/4 wave antenna has a silent “donut hole” straight up. With a low transmit and receive angle you won’t hear it directly overhead. 

 

KC9UQR 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com