ISS Crossband Repeater ON for Field Day


Clint Bradford
 

                                                                                                                        ARISS News Release                                                                                             No.21-39

Dave Jordan, AA4KN 

ARISS PR

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

ARISS Offers More Fun to ARRL Field Day Operators

 

June 20, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) plans to have its ARISS InterOperable Radio System (IORS) in crossband repeater mode for ARRL Field Day. The IORS ham station is located in the Columbus Module of the International Space Station. 

ARRL Hq has confirmed that successful radio contacts made through the ARISS IORS, in crossband repeater mode, will count for an ARRL Field Day QSO point, but also for Field Day bonus points! Another fun opportunity for points. Don’t forget the rule limiting stations to 1 QSO per any single channel FM satellite. On-orbit astronauts always have very busy schedules, but if a voice contact were to be made with them, it would count as a QSO credit but not for satellite bonus points. Only an ARISS crossband repeater QSO qualifies for the bonus. Crossband repeater contacts are also valid for AMSAT Field Day for satellite operations, held concurrently with the ARRL event.   

 

Frequencies for ARISS crossband repeater operation are as follows: 145.990 MHz up, 67 Hz tone and 437.800 MHz down. If you haven’t used the ISS repeater yet, be sure to practice with it before Field Day (June 25 - 26, 2022). These contacts can be tricky, but hams can practice right now…can you do it?

 

 

 

About ARISS: 

 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab-Space Station Explorers, Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) and NASA’s Space communications and Navigation program. The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics topics. ARISS does this by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities take part in hands-on learning activities tied to space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org

 

 

Media Contact: Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR - aa4kn@...

 

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