Topics

[amsat-bb] FM Birds, New Grids, and Chaos

John Brier <johnbrier@...>
 

Not sure if you do this or not, but consider calling people you hear
rather than just throwing your call out.

You might also consider repeating every call you hear back in your
head so you can do the above more easily. Concentrate and keep trying
and eventually you will be able to surf the chaos. Wipe outs will
still happen. Sometimes you can hang ten.

Can you operate portable so you don't have to deal with the noise that
you pick up in the attic?

73, John Brier KG4AKV


On Sat, Feb 16, 2019 at 10:49 PM Les Rayburn <les@...> wrote:

Since getting back into satellites a few months ago, I set my first goal to be completing VUCC. 76 grids confirmed, and hoping to possibly finish up this week.

I’m meeting with the VUCC card checker this week to sign off on my 2 Meter VUCC. That took over five years, since I’m limited to a single 6 element Yagi in the attic. At least half of those contacts came via WJST meteor scatter.

Thought it would be nice to get both 2 Meter and Satellite at the same time.

Most of my contacts have come on the linear birds, with over 2/3 of them on FO-29. I realize that there is a lot more activity and grid activation on the FM birds—so I need to spend more time there.

But the chaos of that type of operation just doesn’t appeal to me. Plus the noise levels in the attic make it difficult for me to hear the FM birds very well. SO-50 comes in “pretty well” but the AO birds are often covered with noise and difficult to hear.

Any tips to improve my success rate on FM? Other than completely avoiding weekend operation! :-)


73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
Maylene, AL
EM63nf
AMSAT #38965, ARRL Life Member, CVHS Life Member, SVHF Member




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Les Rayburn
 

Those are good suggestions. I try to write down calls and grid squares by “reading the mail” on other QSO’s. Then I call that specific station. 

I rarely (if ever) just throw out my call. Sometimes when I’m up late at night I’ll do that, or even call CQ but only when the bird is dead quiet. 

I’ve got a TH-D72A, and an ELK antenna configured for portable operation. Just waiting on warm and dry days to give it a try from the backyard. This winter has been one of the wettest on record here. 

Do wish more operators would be more considerate when the bird is busy. My “wish list” would include: 

  • Make one QSO, then just monitor the rest of the pass—unless someone calls you. 
  • Check Twitter to see if anyone is activating a rare grid. If so, let them control the flow of contacts on the bird. This is especially true of Western grids. Often the pass is very short for those grids, and stations in the East have a limited time to work them. But the bird is often filled with Eastern stations working other Eastern stations during the whole pass. 
  • Resist turning up the power to “muscle” your way in. 

During one pass earlier this evening, I listened to a single QRO station make 5 or 6 contacts during a very crowded pass—simply by muscling other stations, talking over other operators, etc. 

We clearly need more FM birds because the demand is very high. Meanwhile a lot of the linear satellites are empty or nearly so. 

73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
Maylene, AL 
EM63nf
AMSAT #38965, ARRL Life Member, CVHS Life Member, SVHF Member


Brad Smith
 

There is some very poor etiquette and greed among some hams who work some birds. The “I want all the contacts” and “everyone wants to talk to me” attitude prevails at times. It is sad and drives newbies away from trying to make satellite contacts. There is a big disparity between a high power shack station and a portable station using an Arrow or Elk and a HT. 

Brad KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad's iPod
_._,_._,_

k6vug@sbcglobal.net <k6vug@...>
 

Dear Les N1LF,

You wrote "Do wish more operators would be more considerate when the bird is busy" that rings a bell.  In the last six months or so, the fun of getting into the easy sats is attracting more hams.  It is getting more crowded than ever, and the simple recommendation from AMSAT (below) is starting to make much more sense...

As a good practice, AMSAT recommends NOT to call stations that one has QSO-ed in the recent past, giving others a better chance, esp., when someone has taken the trouble to put a new grid on the air.  I do notice some of the "seasoned" hams  practice this quite literally.  Something to think about...


73!
Umesh
k6vug




On Saturday, February 16, 2019, 8:30:47 PM PST, Les Rayburn <les@...> wrote:


Those are good suggestions. I try to write down calls and grid squares by “reading the mail” on other QSO’s. Then I call that specific station.

I rarely (if ever) just throw out my call. Sometimes when I’m up late at night I’ll do that, or even call CQ but only when the bird is dead quiet.

I’ve got a TH-D72A, and an ELK antenna configured for portable operation. Just waiting on warm and dry days to give it a try from the backyard. This winter has been one of the wettest on record here.

Do wish more operators would be more considerate when the bird is busy. My “wish list” would include:

Make one QSO, then just monitor the rest of the pass—unless someone calls you.
Check Twitter to see if anyone is activating a rare grid. If so, let them control the flow of contacts on the bird. This is especially true of Western grids. Often the pass is very short for those grids, and stations in the East have a limited time to work them. But the bird is often filled with Eastern stations working other Eastern stations during the whole pass.
Resist turning up the power to “muscle” your way in.

During one pass earlier this evening, I listened to a single QRO station make 5 or 6 contacts during a very crowded pass—simply by muscling other stations, talking over other operators, etc.

We clearly need more FM birds because the demand is very high. Meanwhile a lot of the linear satellites are empty or nearly so.


73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
Maylene, AL
EM63nf
AMSAT #38965, ARRL Life Member, CVHS Life Member, SVHF Member


_______________________________________________
Sent via AMSAT-BB@.... AMSAT-NA makes this open forum available
to all interested persons worldwide without requiring membership. Opinions expressed
are solely those of the author, and do not reflect the official views of AMSAT-NA.
Not an AMSAT-NA member? Join now to support the amateur satellite program!
Subscription settings: http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb