Date   

CAS-6 Activation Delayed

Clint Bradford
 

CAMSAT Says CAS-6 Activation for Amateur Use has been Delayed publicado en: / published in: https://qrznow.com/camsat-says-cas-6-activation-for-amateur-use-has-been-delayed/ 
 
Chinese Amateur Satellite Group (CAMSAT) CEO Alan Kung, BA1DU, tells ARRL that some problems with the precise attitude determination of the newly launched CAS-6 amateur radio satellite have delayed deployment of the antennas. The satellite was to have been put into service within 3 days.
 
“If the V/UHF antennas are deployed now, additional torque may affect determination of the satellite attitude,” Kung said. “Engineers need to modify and upload the software, which will take some time.” He said that taking into consideration the upcoming long Chinese New Year holiday, the test work is planned to be completed sometime in late February or early March. At that time, VHF/UHF antennas will be deployed, and the amateur radio payload will be available for use.
 
Kung points out that the satellite’s CW beacon has been turned on, although the antenna has not yet been deployed. “If you have a ‘big ear,’ you may be able to receive weak signal leaked from an undeployed antenna on 145.910 MHz,” he said. “A polyimide cover on the antenna chassis can help to leak some RF signal.”
 
CAS-6 launched successfully on December 20, piggybacked on a TIANQIN-1 technology test satellite. The microsatellite will be known as CAS-6/TIANQIN-1, and the call sign is BJ1SO. The primary launch payload was the China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite, CBERS-4A.
 
CAS-6 is in a sun-synchronous orbit with an apogee of 390 miles. It carries a U/V linear transponder, with a downlink of 145.925, 20 kHz passband (inverted) and an uplink of 435.28 MHz. The CW telemetry beacon is on 145.910 MHz, while 4k9 baud GMSK telemetry will be transmitted on 145.890 MHz.
 
CAMSAT has provided CAS-6 Satellite Digital Telemetry Description and CW Telemetry Beacon Encoding Format documents. — Thanks to Alan Kung, BA1DU 
 
Source: ARRL



Re: IC-9700 and the SATS

David Spoelstra
 

We bought an IC-9700 for W9IVY and the club loves it! Works great with SatPC32 on Win10 and Gpredict on Ubuntu.


On Thu, Jan 2, 2020 at 3:57 PM Jer W <jplanner@...> wrote:
I wanted to ask everyone on the board that owns the  IC-9700 about how do you like it and is it great for the SATS and doppler effect?
I understand it also has D-Star, but that mode is rather dead in my area so I could care less about it.  I would have liked to purchase the
Kenwood 2000, but it is not in production anymore and I do not want to get a used one.
Your input is welcomed.
Thanks,

Jerry...W8RQM


IC-9700 and the SATS

Jer W
 

I wanted to ask everyone on the board that owns the  IC-9700 about how do you like it and is it great for the SATS and doppler effect?
I understand it also has D-Star, but that mode is rather dead in my area so I could care less about it.  I would have liked to purchase the
Kenwood 2000, but it is not in production anymore and I do not want to get a used one.
Your input is welcomed.
Thanks,

Jerry...W8RQM


Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Randal Rutkowski
 

Thanks so much!  


On Dec 30, 2019, at 3:44 PM, Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs@...> wrote:

You have to adjust your phase and skew adjustments in the app. 

KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Dec 30, 2019, at 5:06 PM, Randal Rutkowski <randyrutkowski@...> wrote:


<image0.jpeg>

So this was my first try with a 1/4 wave antenna and a HT Baofeng.
Any ideas on how to clear it up so I can get this? Photo?
<image1.jpeg>

Thanks everyone!
Randy
KM6RBG 

On Dec 30, 2019, at 2:22 PM, Brad Ko6kL via Groups.Io <jhill_81@...> wrote:


sync is at 1200hz and highest freq is about 2800hz
you can filter out the 0-1000hz and 2900hz and up.
tracking the iss this weekend with my aprs radio i see the bandwidth is about the same from 2m packet as sstv
as viewed on the sstv waterfall display.
73 Brad Ko6kL
looks like iss is still sending today.

I wonder what frequency the iss radio is receiving in between sending pics.... Hmmm






Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Brad Smith
 

You have to adjust your phase and skew adjustments in the app. 

KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Dec 30, 2019, at 5:06 PM, Randal Rutkowski <randyrutkowski@...> wrote:


<image0.jpeg>

So this was my first try with a 1/4 wave antenna and a HT Baofeng.
Any ideas on how to clear it up so I can get this? Photo?
<image1.jpeg>

Thanks everyone!
Randy
KM6RBG 

On Dec 30, 2019, at 2:22 PM, Brad Ko6kL via Groups.Io <jhill_81@...> wrote:


sync is at 1200hz and highest freq is about 2800hz
you can filter out the 0-1000hz and 2900hz and up.
tracking the iss this weekend with my aprs radio i see the bandwidth is about the same from 2m packet as sstv
as viewed on the sstv waterfall display.
73 Brad Ko6kL
looks like iss is still sending today.

I wonder what frequency the iss radio is receiving in between sending pics.... Hmmm






Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Stefan Wagener
 

Hi Brad,

Since the ISS transmissions (SSTV) are coming from the Russian Zvezda module, using the Kenwood radio set to 145.800MHz, the APRS transmissions from the Columbus module are still active on 145.825MHz. If you have a SDR receiver/software running you actually see both transmissions on your waterfall at the same time. So, the ISS is receiving on 145.825MHz for APRS messages/contacts simultaneously. Two different radios, two different frequencies, one for TX only, the other one for TX/RX. Hope this helps.


73, Stefan VE4SW


Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Randal Rutkowski
 


So this was my first try with a 1/4 wave antenna and a HT Baofeng.
Any ideas on how to clear it up so I can get this? Photo?

Thanks everyone!
Randy
KM6RBG 

On Dec 30, 2019, at 2:22 PM, Brad Ko6kL via Groups.Io <jhill_81@...> wrote:


sync is at 1200hz and highest freq is about 2800hz
you can filter out the 0-1000hz and 2900hz and up.
tracking the iss this weekend with my aprs radio i see the bandwidth is about the same from 2m packet as sstv
as viewed on the sstv waterfall display.
73 Brad Ko6kL
looks like iss is still sending today.

I wonder what frequency the iss radio is receiving in between sending pics.... Hmmm






Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Brad Ko6kL
 

sync is at 1200hz and highest freq is about 2800hz
you can filter out the 0-1000hz and 2900hz and up.
tracking the iss this weekend with my aprs radio i see the bandwidth is about the same from 2m packet as sstv
as viewed on the sstv waterfall display.
73 Brad Ko6kL
looks like iss is still sending today.

I wonder what frequency the iss radio is receiving in between sending pics.... Hmmm






QSL Card for ISS SSTV Reception

Clint Bradford
 

Did you know you can receive (pun intended) a QSL card for merely receiving signals from the ISS?

You do not need to complete a voice contact with an astronaut ... If you simply receive signals, or receive 
SSTV or packet - you can acquire a QSL card!

Per the ARISS.org Web site - 

Please send your QSL report by mail  to the address of the office listed below for your region. Include in your QSL report: date, time in UTC, frequency and mode (voice, packet or sstv). If you wish to receive a card, you must include a self-addressed, stamped envelope with proper postage or with sufficient International Reply Coupons (at least 2 IRCs). 

Email addresses listed below are provided for inquiries only-- you must apply for QSL cards by mail.

Send your QSL cards or reports to one of the following addresses: 

USA:
Bruce Hunter, W6WW
ARISS USA QSL Manager
13436 Lakota Road
Apple Valley CA 92308
Email

Canada and the Americas, except USA:
Radio Amateurs of Canada
ARISS QSL
720 Belfast Road, Suite 217
Ottawa Ontario
K1G 0Z5

Europe, Africa and the Middle East:
Christophe Candébat , F1MOJ
ARISS Europe QSL Manager
19 Chemin des Escoumeilles
66820 Vernet les Bains
France
Email

Japan, Asia, Pacific and Australia:
ARISS Japan QSL
JARL International Section
Otsuka HT Bldg.
3-43-1 Minamiotsuka
Toshima-ku
Tokyo 170-8073
JAPAN

Russia:
Alexander Davydov, RN3DK
Novo - Mytishchinsky prospekt 52 - 111
Mytishchi 18, Moskovskaya obl.
141018, RUSSIA
Email


/end/


Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Clint Bradford
 

Just Narrowband FM ...


Re: ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Clint Bradford
 


ISS SSTV, Bandwidth

Jim Iden
 

Dear Folks, I'm setting-up SDRSharp to hopefully capture an image from the ISS tomorrow.  Is 8 kHz an appropriate bandwidth to use for this signal?  Thanks and best regards, Jim, KI5EWG


Re: Yes - Another ISS SSTV Project!

Ken Campbell
 

Clint,

Many thanks fo the information! I may just give this a try. Never worked a SAT or the ISS before. 👍🏻😁
Happy New Year to you and your family!
--
All the best,
Ken Campbell
N6PCD


Re: Yes - Another ISS SSTV Project!

Clint Bradford
 

For those who are new to our SSTV events, occasionally throughout the year, ARISS coordinates with the ISS crew to set up our ham station on board the ISS to automatically downlink SSTV images over several days, allowing radio enthusiasts on Earth to receive them and post them online at the ARISS SSTV Gallery.
We will be starting such an event tomorrow and you can review details about it in a post I sent out on this time line a few days ago.

Below I've reposted a tutorial on an easy way you can get in on the action.

-------------------

A Quick and easy way to receive the SSTV transmissions from the ISS

I know everyone gets really excited when they hear about an upcoming ARISS SSTV Event. These events currently run at 145.8 MHz using the PD-120 mode. So here is an easy and portable way that I use to receive and store the SSTV images. In my case, it involves using my Android Smartphone and a handheld 2 meter handy talkie or more commonly referred to as an HT. As long as you have a radio that will receive the 2 meter ham band in FM mode and at least a ¼ wave whip antenna or better, you should be able to receive pretty clear images during the downlinking depending on the maximum height of the pass and a moderately reasonable audio level coming from the ISS.

But first, if you don’t already have an app that predicts when the ISS will pass over your location, you can search for a free app online that does this. I use ISS Detector myself and found it gives me all the information I’m looking for plus a real time tracking map, but there are other tracking apps out there that should work just as well for what we are doing here. You can also visit the AMSAT website at www.amsat.org, go to Pass Predictions under the Satellite Info dropdown, configure your location and other parameters and print upcoming passes for the period of the event.

So now to acquire the SSTV images, I like to use a free app called Robot36 that I found using Google and installed on my Smartphone. Don’t let the name fool you. This software is capable of demodulating more SSTV modes than just Robot 36 and as I mentioned before, the mode we’ll be going for is PD 120. So once you have the software installed, launch it and it will automatically begin scanning. It will probably default to Auto Mode when you launch the app. If not, you can press on the three vertical dots in the top right hand corner of your screen to open the main menu. Here I press Select Mode and then press either Auto Mode or PD 120. You’ll see the screen just scanning noise before the signal is heard. If you want to be sure you phone mic is working before the pass, you can whistle a steady tone into the phone for a few seconds and you should see where the noise smoothed out on your screen, proving the mic heard your whistle and is in working order.

Once the pass begins, hold your phone close to your radio speaker and before too long, you should hear the SSTV signal start up and your screen should begin printing the top edge of the image. Once the image begins to print to the screen, I immediately press the X in the top screen tool bar, resetting the scan to the top of the screen. The printing continues down the screen until the entire image is displayed. For Apple users, see the note at the end for available software.

So now you’re set up to know when the next ISS pass will occur over your area and you have a way to capture and view the images. You’re almost done! All you need to do now is switch on your 2 meter rig. If it’s a multimode rig, but sure it’s switched to receive FM signals. Tune the rig to receive 145.8 MHz, raise the volume to a reasonable listening level, place it near your smartphone and YOU’RE DONE!

Once you receive an image you’re proud of, you can submit it online at the ARISS SSTV Gallery at https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/ for all the world to see and to really make your day, you can receive a really nice SSTV ARISS Award just for posting your image. See details about this at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ .

Now for a few hints and details.

I suggest you start listening for the image at least 5 minutes prior to the posted start time. That way you’re pretty much guaranteed to not miss any of the action and the best passes only last around 10 minutes.

Whip antennas work pretty well, but a small 3 element handheld 2 meter beam works much better for getting a clear image with little if any noise lines. These beam antennas can be purchased or you can use the DIY method from directions available from online sources.

Using your tracking app, figure out where along the horizon to expect the ISS to start rising so you will know where to point your directional antenna if you’re using one and not miss any of the action.

Due to Doppler shift, you may find that the audio of the SSTV signal begins to take on noise that can erode the quality of the image as you are receiving it. If that begins to happen during a pass, you should slightly retune your radio to the correct signal frequency coming from the ISS. Try moving your frequency slightly up or down (no more than +/- 3 KHz from 145.8 MHz).You may find this attenuates the noise and improves your image reception.

To save and send your images from your Robot36 app, press the “share” symbol at the top of the screen and then choose See All to list all the choices for image transfer or storage. Also you can use the symbol at the top of the screen that resembles an old floppy disc. That’s another way to store an image.

For Apple users, I did a quick survey of fellow hams to see what SSTV viewer was their favorite for IPods, IPhones and IPads. Black Cat Systems for Ipod, IPhone and IPad was most mentioned as a source for apps.

That’s All,
Now it’s time to tune in and have some fun!

Dave, AA4KN
ARISS PR


Re: IC-9700 and the SATS

Jer W
 

Thanks Brad,
I thought that with already having two 2M/70cm rigs, I certainly do not need a third one.
Hopefully we can make a contact on the birds after the first of the year.

Jerry...W8RQM




On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 2:58:39 PM EST, Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs@...> wrote:


Hi Jerry:

That would work, but the 72A is full duplex. I record right from my 72A. I try to keep things simple.

73 Brad KC9UQR

In a message dated 12/23/2019 7:51:15 PM Central Standard Time, jplanner@... writes:


Brad,
   I have both the Kenwood TH-D72A  HT and Yeasu FTM-400XDR. Any thoughts on using the HT for the up link and the Yeasu for the down link?

Jerry...W8RQM







On Monday, December 23, 2019, 6:45:59 PM EST, Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs@...> wrote:


I use two antennas, both differently polarized, on the roof of my vehicle. The Comet CA-2x4SR NMO is vertically polarized and has properties that suit satellite work. This antenna is placed in the center of the roof. http://www.cometantenna.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/CA-2x4SR1.pdf

 

The COMPACTENNA is elliptically polarized and a very good satellite antenna. It must be placed on the corner of the vehicle. It is their 2 meter/440 model. https://compactenna.com/products/  On this site, there are explanations and videos that explain this antenna.

 

I use a AB switch to switch between the two antennas, depending on which one is performing the best at the moment. The COMPACTENNA is also very good at working directly overhead. Being omni-directional, there is no “doughnut hole”.

 

KC9UQR


In a message dated 12/19/2019 7:22:12 PM Central Standard Time, LaneKG@... writes:

Brad, 

Can you provide some details about your antennas? I have some success with the vertically polarized mobile whip and the 710GA. What other antenna do you use on your vehicle?

Greg N4KGL

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019, 9:17 AM Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, I manually Doppler tune the TM-D710GA. I work portable with this radio, from my van, with two differently polarized antennas that I place on the van roof, and an A-B switch to switch between the two. I do love the radio.

 



Re: IC-9700 and the SATS

Brad Smith
 

Hi Jerry:

That would work, but the 72A is full duplex. I record right from my 72A. I try to keep things simple.

73 Brad KC9UQR

In a message dated 12/23/2019 7:51:15 PM Central Standard Time, jplanner@... writes:


Brad,
   I have both the Kenwood TH-D72A  HT and Yeasu FTM-400XDR. Any thoughts on using the HT for the up link and the Yeasu for the down link?

Jerry...W8RQM







On Monday, December 23, 2019, 6:45:59 PM EST, Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs@...> wrote:


I use two antennas, both differently polarized, on the roof of my vehicle. The Comet CA-2x4SR NMO is vertically polarized and has properties that suit satellite work. This antenna is placed in the center of the roof. http://www.cometantenna.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/CA-2x4SR1.pdf

 

The COMPACTENNA is elliptically polarized and a very good satellite antenna. It must be placed on the corner of the vehicle. It is their 2 meter/440 model. https://compactenna.com/products/  On this site, there are explanations and videos that explain this antenna.

 

I use a AB switch to switch between the two antennas, depending on which one is performing the best at the moment. The COMPACTENNA is also very good at working directly overhead. Being omni-directional, there is no “doughnut hole”.

 

KC9UQR


In a message dated 12/19/2019 7:22:12 PM Central Standard Time, LaneKG@... writes:

Brad, 

Can you provide some details about your antennas? I have some success with the vertically polarized mobile whip and the 710GA. What other antenna do you use on your vehicle?

Greg N4KGL

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019, 9:17 AM Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, I manually Doppler tune the TM-D710GA. I work portable with this radio, from my van, with two differently polarized antennas that I place on the van roof, and an A-B switch to switch between the two. I do love the radio.

 



Yes - Another ISS SSTV Project!

Clint Bradford
 

ARISS News Release                                                               No. 19-18
 
Dave Jordan, AA4KN 
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...
Dec. 24, 2019 
SSTV Event Planned for Late December
 
ARISS is planning an SSTV event featuring commemorative images. This event is currently scheduled to begin on December 28, 2019 at 11:00 UTC and ends at 18:20 UTC on January 1, 2020. Please make note that sometimes changes may occur in the crew work schedule that could affect our SSTV transmission dates and times, so frequently check our ARISS Facebook and Twitter accounts shown below for any updates before and throughout the event.   
 
Transmissions will be sent at 145.800 MHz FM in the SSTV mode PD-120. Once received, images can be posted and viewed by the public at

http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

and you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image.

See https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ for details.

Also for simplicity, we have added a new information tab for SSTV events, under the General Contacts pulldown menu at www.ariss.org . 
 
About ARISS:
 
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.
 
ARISS Facebook: Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS)
ARISS Twitter: @ARISS_status
 
Media Contact:
Dave Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...


Re: Another ISS SSTV Project?

Clint Bradford
 

And here is how to get your certificate for SSTV reception for this event ...

https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/


Re: IC-9700 and the SATS

Jer W
 

Brad,
   I have both the Kenwood TH-D72A  HT and Yeasu FTM-400XDR. Any thoughts on using the HT for the up link and the Yeasu for the down link?

Jerry...W8RQM







On Monday, December 23, 2019, 6:45:59 PM EST, Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs@...> wrote:


I use two antennas, both differently polarized, on the roof of my vehicle. The Comet CA-2x4SR NMO is vertically polarized and has properties that suit satellite work. This antenna is placed in the center of the roof. http://www.cometantenna.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/CA-2x4SR1.pdf

 

The COMPACTENNA is elliptically polarized and a very good satellite antenna. It must be placed on the corner of the vehicle. It is their 2 meter/440 model. https://compactenna.com/products/  On this site, there are explanations and videos that explain this antenna.

 

I use a AB switch to switch between the two antennas, depending on which one is performing the best at the moment. The COMPACTENNA is also very good at working directly overhead. Being omni-directional, there is no “doughnut hole”.

 

KC9UQR


In a message dated 12/19/2019 7:22:12 PM Central Standard Time, LaneKG@... writes:

Brad, 

Can you provide some details about your antennas? I have some success with the vertically polarized mobile whip and the 710GA. What other antenna do you use on your vehicle?

Greg N4KGL

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019, 9:17 AM Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, I manually Doppler tune the TM-D710GA. I work portable with this radio, from my van, with two differently polarized antennas that I place on the van roof, and an A-B switch to switch between the two. I do love the radio.

 



Re: IC-9700 and the SATS

Brad Smith
 

I use two antennas, both differently polarized, on the roof of my vehicle. The Comet CA-2x4SR NMO is vertically polarized and has properties that suit satellite work. This antenna is placed in the center of the roof. http://www.cometantenna.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/CA-2x4SR1.pdf

 

The COMPACTENNA is elliptically polarized and a very good satellite antenna. It must be placed on the corner of the vehicle. It is their 2 meter/440 model. https://compactenna.com/products/  On this site, there are explanations and videos that explain this antenna.

 

I use a AB switch to switch between the two antennas, depending on which one is performing the best at the moment. The COMPACTENNA is also very good at working directly overhead. Being omni-directional, there is no “doughnut hole”.

 

KC9UQR


In a message dated 12/19/2019 7:22:12 PM Central Standard Time, LaneKG@... writes:

Brad, 

Can you provide some details about your antennas? I have some success with the vertically polarized mobile whip and the 710GA. What other antenna do you use on your vehicle?

Greg N4KGL

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019, 9:17 AM Brad Smith via Groups.Io <corlissbs=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, I manually Doppler tune the TM-D710GA. I work portable with this radio, from my van, with two differently polarized antennas that I place on the van roof, and an A-B switch to switch between the two. I do love the radio.