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Re: ISS SSTV Projects

Stefan Wagener
 

Now the $5 question:

Is it coming from the Russian module (like in the past) or is it with the new Kenwood radio from the Columbus module?

Stefan

On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 9:35 AM Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
From RF2Space -

MAI #SSTV experiment to operate on

Sep 30 from 13:05 to 18:45 UTC and on

Oct. 1 from 12:30 to 17:45 UTC on 145.800.

Check your pass times! 

#ISSrepeater will remain active during this time on 437.800


Re: ISS SSTV Projects

Clint Bradford
 

From RF2Space -

MAI #SSTV experiment to operate on

Sep 30 from 13:05 to 18:45 UTC and on

Oct. 1 from 12:30 to 17:45 UTC on 145.800.

Check your pass times! 

#ISSrepeater will remain active during this time on 437.800


Re: ISS SSTV Projects

Clint Bradford
 

Possible SSTV activity from the ISS - 145.800, historically PD 120 mode.

09-30-2020,  13:05 UTC to 18:45 UTC

10-01-2020,  12:30 UTC to 17:40 UTC

10-4-2020, 09:30 UTC through 10-8-2020  09:15 UTC


ISS SSTV Projects

Clint Bradford
 

Possible SSTV projects from the ISS coming - receiving their wonderful images can be VERY simple! Check out ...

https://www.work-sat.com/sstv.html

... for more information!


Re: AMSAT-NA's LIVE OSCAR Status Page

Clint Bradford
 

Using and entering YOUR pass data for the ISS’ new crossband repeater is VERY useful - especially since it is turned OFF for ARISS events, and when missions approach/leave the ISS.

It will be turned off approx 0900 UTC this Monday to support an ARISS contact.


AMSAT ELECTIONS - Deleted

Clint Bradford
 

[Post deleted by ADMIN ... ]

Nope, WE4B, you are not welcome here. Your accounts / IPs have been
banned. Just stay away - I respect my audience more than to subject them
to your writings.

Clint Bradford K6LCS


ISS Crossband Repeater - What a Month!

Clint Bradford
 

Just a thanks to ARISS Dave and Dave, Kenneth in Houston, Gordo and Chip in Orange 
County, CA, and to Marvelous Rosalie for ALL the work getting our new asset up and 
running and ham-tested!

AND - OF COURSE - THANKS to ALL the hams and their signal reports!

From the ARISS team -

This project of the InterOperable Radio System (IORS) was launched from Kennedy Space Center on March 6, 2020 on board the SpaceX CRS-20 resupply mission. It consists of a special, space-modified JVC Kenwood D710GA transceiver, an ARISS-developed multi-voltage power supply, and interconnecting cables. The design, development, fabrication, testing, and launch of the first IORS was an incredible five-year engineering achievement accomplished by the ARISS hardware volunteer team. It will enable new, exciting capabilities for ham radio operators, students, and the general public. Capabilities include a higher power radio, voice repeater, digital packet radio (APRS) capabilities and a Kenwood VC-H1 slow scan television (SSTV) system.
 
A second IORS undergoes flight certification and will be launched later for installation in the Russian Service module. This second system enables dual, simultaneous operations, (e.g., voice repeater and APRS packet), providing diverse opportunities for radio amateurs. It also provides on-orbit redundancy to ensure continuous operations in the event of an IORS component failure. 
 
Next-gen development efforts continue. For the IORS, parts are being procured and a total of ten systems are being fabricated to support flight, additional flight spares, ground testing and astronaut training. Follow-on next generation radio system elements include an L-band repeater uplink capability, currently in development, and a flight Raspberry-Pi, dubbed “ARISS-Pi,” that is just beginning the design phase. The ARISS-Pi promises operations autonomy and enhanced SSTV operations. 
 
ARISS is run almost entirely by volunteers, and with the help of generous contributions from ARISS sponsors and individuals. Donations to the ARISS program for next generation hardware developments, operations, education, and administration are welcome -- please go to https://www.ariss.org/donate.html to contribute to these efforts.

/end/


Re: Operating tips

Arup
 

David,

Yes, I do need to turn the squelch off. I thought it was weird that the Yaseu FT-71 was so quiet with the squelch "off". My baofeng did have the white noise. Somehow I was able to get a good recording of PO101 in the middle of the afternoon over the weekend even with the squelch on!

Turns out I just turned the "squelch threshold level" off. As a new ham I don't fully understand the difference between "squelch" and "squelch threshold level", but turning the "squelch" off will definitely help in my endeavors.

And thank you for the advice.

Arup
KE8OTP


Re: Operating tips

David Spoelstra
 

Arup-
One thing about your recording. Mine always has constant background hiss because my squelch is wide open. When you are working the sats, you should have your squelch wide open.
-David, N9KT


On Tue, Sep 22, 2020 at 7:49 PM Arup <Arup.Mallik@...> wrote:
Hi All,

I've attached my recording of the ISS pass tonight at 22:39z with a max elevation of 57 degrees from FN01.

A few questions
1. Can anyone offer tips on how to work a "smoother" pass? As you'll notice if you listen to the recording I often can only hear the call or grid, but not both. As such I'm hesitant to key-up and attempt a contact. I do have the doppler shift programmed in to the memory. I start at 437.815 and go down to 437.785 by 0.005 MHZ and I try to follow the path of the pass using SatSat and the compass on my phone. 

2. Is the choppiness due to being in a mountainous area? Or are people "stepping" on each other?

Arup
KE8OTP


Re: Operating tips

David Spoelstra
 

Off hours is definitely the key. I'm a night owl, so I concentrate on passes from 10pm - 1am. I've been able to make up to six contacts in a pass! During the day, I'm lucky to make one.
-David, N9KT


On Tue, Sep 22, 2020 at 8:40 PM Arup <Arup.Mallik@...> wrote:
Thanks for the reassurance. I tried another working a pass on PO101 earlier today (18:25z) and had the same issue so I was beginning to think it was me. My recording of PO101 sounds similar. 


Re: Operating tips

Arup
 

Thanks for the reassurance. I tried another working a pass on PO101 earlier today (18:25z) and had the same issue so I was beginning to think it was me. My recording of PO101 sounds similar. 


Re: Operating tips

Clint Bradford
 

You are doing nothing wrong! Just too many people all at once, and some without proper tone.


Try more “off-peak” hour passes ... More power is NOT the cure!

It will calm down ...


Operating tips

Arup
 

Hi All,

I've attached my recording of the ISS pass tonight at 22:39z with a max elevation of 57 degrees from FN01.

A few questions
1. Can anyone offer tips on how to work a "smoother" pass? As you'll notice if you listen to the recording I often can only hear the call or grid, but not both. As such I'm hesitant to key-up and attempt a contact. I do have the doppler shift programmed in to the memory. I start at 437.815 and go down to 437.785 by 0.005 MHZ and I try to follow the path of the pass using SatSat and the compass on my phone. 

2. Is the choppiness due to being in a mountainous area? Or are people "stepping" on each other?

Arup
KE8OTP


Re: ISS Crossband Repeater Back UP

Brad Ko6kL
 

the iss was coming in good yesterday afternoon, I heard Patrick , as I was driving on i5 out here...



Re: ISS Crossband Repeater Back UP

Clint Bradford
 

On Mon, Sep 21, 2020 at 05:07 PM, Clint Bradford wrote:
Switches flipped - it is back ON!!!
Got word earlier this afternoon from Houston that a recycling of the radio power took care of the problem.
Soon after that, I heard John, KG4AKV making QSOs and the system sounded good.


ISS Crossband Repeater Back UP

Clint Bradford
 

Switches flipped - it is back ON!!!


FO-29 Sked

Clint Bradford
 

 
ja1ogz
⁦‪@ja1ogz‬⁩
FO-29 Operation schedule

Oct.
4 02:43-04:30-
10 02:28- 04:15-
11 01:35-03:20-
17 01:20-03:05-
18 02:10-03:54-
24 01:55-03:40-
25 02:45-04:30-
31 02:30-04:15-

Nov.
1 01:35-03:20-
2 01:30-03:15-

73's de JA1OGZ


Working the ISS - Notes

Clint Bradford
 
Edited

A few notes from the IORS team designers on the capture effect and hints for operating techniques ...
* If you have tried satellite contacts in the past, follow the same recommendations you learned for a U/V satellite you've worked through.
 
The ham radio good operator rule--try your contact when you hear no one transmitting.

* Listen between 1 and 6 AM your time or whenever it is an “off peak” ham radio quiet time in your area.

* Wherever you live, think about the area of the world around you that has the least ham radio activity--next, check for the time the ISS footprint is in that least-ham-radio-activity area, and then try your contact. For instance, for people in Illinois, when the ISS footprint is over Lake Michigan or heading to Canada, try your contact. Same idea for the US coasts or large national forests, etc.

* The ham radio good operating recommendation for all modes -- run minimum power - 5W - into a 7 dB gain antenna on the uplink.

When tons of people are transmitting at once with more power, the capture effect doesn't allow signals to get through. 
 
It will calm down after a bit and get easier to work our new asset in the sky!


Re: ISS FM Repeater off the air

Clint Bradford
 


ISS FM Repeater off the air

David Spoelstra
 

FYI for anyone trying, the ISS FM Repeater has been off the air for over 24 hours now. Here's a great page to see the status of the birds:

-David, N9KT

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