Date   

ARISS in FM Repeater Mode

Roger Hackler
 

First Element of ARISS Next Generation (Next-Gen)
Radio System Installed in ISS Columbus Module


ARISS News Release                                                                                                  No.   20-13      

 
September 2, 2020—The ARISS team is pleased to announce that set up and installation of the first element of our next generation radio system was completed and amateur radio operations with it are now underway. This first element, dubbed the InterOperable Radio System (IORS), was installed in the International Space Station Columbus module. The IORS replaces the Ericsson radio system and packet module that were originally certified for spaceflight on July 26, 2000.
 
Initial operation of the new radio system is in FM cross band repeater mode using an uplink frequency of 145.99 MHz with an access tone of 67 Hz and a downlink frequency of 437.800 MHz. System activation was first observed at 01:02 UTC on September 2. Special operations will continue to be announced.
 
The IORS was launched from Kennedy Space Center on March 6, 2020 on board the SpaceX CRS-20 resupply mission. It consists of a special, space-modified JVC Kenwood D710GA transceiver, an ARISS developed multi-voltage power supply and interconnecting cables. The design, development, fabrication, testing, and launch of the first IORS was an incredible five-year engineering achievement accomplished by the ARISS hardware volunteer team. It will enable new, exciting capabilities for ham radio operators, students, and the general public. Capabilities include a higher power radio, voice repeater, digital packet radio (APRS) capabilities and a Kenwood VC-H1 slow scan television (SSTV) system.
 
A second IORS undergoes flight certification and will be launched later for installation in the Russian Service module. This second system enables dual, simultaneous operations, (e.g. voice repeater and APRS packet), providing diverse opportunities for radio amateurs. It also provides on-orbit redundancy to ensure continuous operations in the event of an IORS component failure. 
 
Next-gen development efforts continue. For the IORS, parts are being procured and a total of ten systems are being fabricated to support flight, additional flight spares, ground testing and astronaut training. Follow-on next generation radio system elements include an L-band repeater uplink capability, currently in development, and a flight Raspberry-Pi, dubbed “ARISS-Pi,” that is just beginning the design phase.  The ARISS-Pi promises operations autonomy and enhanced SSTV operations. 

 

 

 


Re: Upcoming Zoom Satellite Presentations

Clint Bradford
 

THAT was a great 2-1/4 hours!

I am referring to presenting my satellite show to the GARDEN STATE AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION ...

https://www.gsara.club/

Their September newsletter ...

https://www.gsara.club/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/SEPTEMBER-2020-PROPAGATOR.pdf

What made the presentation great was their wonderful Q&A afterward. THEY made the show!

(And I just KNEW that a club that had in its membership a rabbi and a Roman Catholic priest 
would enjoy my wife's favorite joke - inserted in an appropriate spot:

A priest, a minister, and a rabbit walk into a bar. The rabbit says, "I think I'm a typo."
 
Next presentations  September 14 and October 27 (the October one is almost full).

And the Q&A turned into a general conversation. NO politics. Just a bunch o' hams 
chatting about what they are doing in their region, and the amateur and commercial
radio industries.

Clint
909-999-SATS 



Re: ISS FM Repeater

AF7ZA
 

Thanks for the heads up Clint
Bill

On Sep 2, 2020, at 10:48 12AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

New
The ARISS team is pleased to announce that set up and installation of the first element of our next generation radio system was completed and amateur radio operations with it are now underway. 

This first element, dubbed the InterOperable Radio System (IORS), was installed in the International Space Station Columbus module. 


The IORS replaces the Ericsson radio systemand packet module that were originally certified for spaceflight on July 26, 2000.


Initial operation of the new radio system is in FM cross band repeater mode using an uplink frequency of 145.99 MHz with an access tone of 67 Hz and a downlink frequency of 437.800 MHz. 

System activation was first observed at 01:02 UTC on September 2. Special operations will continue to be announced.


The IORS was launched from Kennedy Space Center on March 6, 2020 on board the SpaceX CRS-20 resupply mission. 

It consists of a special, space-modified JVC Kenwood D710GA transceiver, an ARISS developed multi-voltage power supply and interconnecting cables. 

The design, development, fabrication, testing, and launch of the first IORS was an incredible five-year engineering achievement accomplished by the ARISS hardware volunteer team. It will enable new, exciting capabilities for ham radio operators, students, and the general public. 

Capabilities include a higher power radio, voice repeater, digital packet radio (APRS) capabilities and a Kenwood VC-H1 slow scan television (SSTV) system.


A second IORS undergoes flight certification and will be launched later for installation in the Russian Service module. This second system enables dual, simultaneous operations, (e.g. voice repeater and APRS packet), providing diverse opportunities for radio amateurs. It also provides on-orbit redundancy to ensure continuous operations in the event of an IORS component failure.


Next-gen development efforts continue. For the IORS, parts are being procured and a total of ten systems are being fabricated to support flight, additional flight spares, ground testing and astronaut training. Follow-on next generation radio system elements include an L-band repeater uplink capability, currently in development, and a flight Raspberry-Pi, dubbed “ARISS-Pi,” that is just beginning the design phase. The ARISS-Pi promises operations autonomy and enhanced SSTV operations.



ARISS–Celebrating 20 years of continuous amateur radio operations on the ISS!


info by ARISS team .


73 de IW2BSF - Rudy


Re: Upcoming Zoom Satellite Presentations

Clint Bradford
 

Please send me a quick email to ...

k6lcs@...

... and just say “Zoom” ... it will send you to a quick Survey Monkey survey ...


Re: Upcoming Zoom Satellite Presentations

noslracgl@...
 

Hi, Clint...

I attended your last presentation, but I had to leave midway to take my exam for my Amateur Extra license (I passed).

I would like to try again for the September 14 presentation. Please send me the details.

Thank you,

Larry, N6LGC

On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 10:57 PM Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Need to shut down accepting additional attendees for the September 2 
presentation ...
 
But still accepting requests to attend either of these two dates:
 
- September 14
- October 27

If you might be interested in attending either of these Zoom presentations, 
please send me a private email for exact times and Zoom meeting number! 
 
And don't not forget to update your Zoom app regularly - ONLY by going 
directly to their Web site or using the app's drop-down option, "Check for 
updates."

Clint Bradford K6LCS
909-999-SATS (7287)
k6lcs@...
 


ISS FM Repeater

Clint Bradford
 
Edited

 
The ARISS team is pleased to announce that set up and installation of the first element of our next generation radio system was completed and amateur radio operations with it are now underway. 


This first element, dubbed the InterOperable Radio System (IORS), was installed in the International Space Station Columbus module. 


The IORS replaces the Ericsson radio systemand packet module that were originally certified for spaceflight on July 26, 2000.


Initial operation of the new radio system is in FM cross band repeater mode using an uplink frequency of 145.99 MHz with an access tone of 67 Hz and a downlink frequency of 437.800 MHz. 

System activation was first observed at 01:02 UTC on September 2. Special operations will continue to be announced.


The IORS was launched from Kennedy Space Center on March 6, 2020 on board the SpaceX CRS-20 resupply mission. 

It consists of a special, space-modified JVC Kenwood D710GA transceiver, an ARISS developed multi-voltage power supply and interconnecting cables. 

The design, development, fabrication, testing, and launch of the first IORS was an incredible five-year engineering achievement accomplished by the ARISS hardware volunteer team. It will enable new, exciting capabilities for ham radio operators, students, and the general public. 

Capabilities include a higher power radio, voice repeater, digital packet radio (APRS) capabilities and a Kenwood VC-H1 slow scan television (SSTV) system.


A second IORS undergoes flight certification and will be launched later for installation in the Russian Service module. This second system enables dual, simultaneous operations, (e.g. voice repeater and APRS packet), providing diverse opportunities for radio amateurs. It also provides on-orbit redundancy to ensure continuous operations in the event of an IORS component failure.


Next-gen development efforts continue. For the IORS, parts are being procured and a total of ten systems are being fabricated to support flight, additional flight spares, ground testing and astronaut training. Follow-on next generation radio system elements include an L-band repeater uplink capability, currently in development, and a flight Raspberry-Pi, dubbed “ARISS-Pi,” that is just beginning the design phase. The ARISS-Pi promises operations autonomy and enhanced SSTV operations.



ARISS–Celebrating 20 years of continuous amateur radio operations on the ISS!


info by ARISS team .


73 de IW2BSF - Rudy


Satellite Re-entry

Clint Bradford
 

I found this webpage and thought you might like it  ...

https://www.space.com/ogo-1-satellite-reentry-coming.html


Re: AO-92 - Battery Situation

Clint Bradford
 

From AMSAT News -

AO-92 has been experiencing low battery voltage during many night time passes over the last several weeks.


While the satellite is in eclipse 
voltage has been dropping low enough (3.6v IIRC) to cause an automatic shift to safe mode. It emerges from eclipse toward the end of night passes over North America and the transponder will then switch on, usually with a minute or two remaining in the pass. As we move to winter in the northern hemisphere, the end of the eclipse should shift over the pole and to the beginning of the descending part of the orbit, and this issue should change for at least the northern hemisphere ops.

[ANS thanks Andrew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AMSAT VP Operations, and Nate White, N5LEX, for the above information]


Re: PO-101 and SO-50 with an Elk and Baofeng UV-5X3

Ramesh SA
 

I use  a Woxun with a Nagoya whip antenna and can access the AO91 and A092 sats perfectly...I am from India...So51 has always been a problem ...


Re: Upcoming Zoom Satellite Presentations

Clint Bradford
 

Need to shut down accepting additional attendees for the September 2 
presentation ...
 
But still accepting requests to attend either of these two dates:
 
- September 14
- October 27

If you might be interested in attending either of these Zoom presentations, 
please send me a private email for exact times and Zoom meeting number! 
 
And don't not forget to update your Zoom app regularly - ONLY by going 
directly to their Web site or using the app's drop-down option, "Check for 
updates."

Clint Bradford K6LCS
909-999-SATS (7287)
k6lcs@...
 


Re: PO-101 and SO-50 with an Elk and Baofeng UV-5X3

Brad Smith
 

Arup:
 
Read what Clint uses for a radio. It is cheap and works very well. Great to start out with. I used a cheap Yaesu FT-60 (Just an older model of the same) for 7 years and worked many many passes.
 
Brad KC9UQR


Re: PO-101 and SO-50 with an Elk and Baofeng UV-5X3

Arup
 

Hi Clint - 

I tried using a Nagoya whip about a week ago and was not able to hear even AO91 or AO92 (but this was during the working hours around 1500 UTC so the birds may have been quiet).

Over the weekend I splurged and bought an Elk LPDA. Even with the Elk I was not able to hear PO-101 today (which has a 2M downlink).

Since I'm not able to even hear the downlinks at times I have not yet attempted to talk over the birds. I contacted the person who gave a satellites talk at QSO Today virtual expo and he seemed to think my radio is partly to blame. I just wanted some more opinions to decide if I need to get a better radio.

Arup
KE8OTP


PO-101 and SO-50 with an Elk and Baofeng UV-5X3

Arup
 

Good day - and WELCOME to the group!

YES - The 2M downlinks from AO-91/92 are MUCH stronger than a LEO's 440mHZ 
similar-TX-power downlinks.

And - depending upon time of day - you might just have been one of a very few 
Listening" for SO-50 ... In which case you need to transmit a 74.4 tone for a few 
seconds to turn its 10-minute timer ON. THEN others (who may not know that!) 
might be there for you.

What antenna(s) are you using? The 2M downlinks are able t be heard with 
stock ducks - although you really need some gain to properly work the 
satellites.

Clint K6LCS


------------------------
I was able to listen to either AO-91 or AO-92 on Monday with my set-up at about 20:00 or 20:30 UTC, though not very well. Today I tried to listen to both SO-50 and PO-101 at about 18:45 UTC and heard neither. On the AMSAT website SO-50 was heard at about 18:45 UTC from FM19. I'm in FN01 and was on top of a parking garage today with a clear view of the sky in all directions. 

Are my issues stemming from the cheap radio or was no one on the birds when I tried to listen? At first I reasoned that I could not hear SO-50 as the downlink is 70cm. When I couldn't hear PO-101 I started to scratch my head a bit. I've seen youtube videos where folks are successful with the baofengs, but I have yet to find success. Anyone have thoughts?

Arup


AO-92 - Battery Situation

Clint Bradford
 

For the time being, please use AO-92 as "normal." The satellite is 
going through a battery problem - so you may find it OFF at the end of 
an eclipse.


Upcoming Zoom Satellite Presentations

Clint Bradford
 

The announcement of my 8/15/2020 session with the TRGA club is still on the home page at QRZ.com and elsewhere ...

BUT - there is good news! I am conducting "working the easy satellites" sessions via Zoom on ...

- September 2
- September 14
- October 27

If you might be interested in attending either of these Zoom presentations, please send me a private email for exact times and Zoom meeting number! And don't not forget to update your Zoom app regularly - ONLY by going directly to their Web site or using the app's drop-down option, "Check for updates."

Clint Bradford K6LCS
909-999-SATS (7287)
k6lcs@...


Re: Satellite Show in Georgia (US) 8/15/2020

Clint Bradford
 

Clint,

 

Please let me thank you (and Karen) for an AWESOME and entertaining presentation. You are one of those very positive examples of people in this hobby that makes it so great.

 

Your presentation was informative and very entertaining, and with the assistance of your wife Karen it was run error-free. 

 

Our team would highly recommend this presentation to anyone exploring Amateur Radio Satellites.

 

 

Thanks – 73

Jerome Erickson – KK1JE
TeamRadioGA - Radio with Purpose!

GA Southeast District AuxComm/ARES
Net - Tuesday 1900 hours
-146.745 pl 97.4 / Guyton ARES repeater

Echolink 738635 / AllStar 45029

www.trga.us

 

 

 


Re: Satellite Show in Georgia (US) 8/15/2020

Clint Bradford
 

Bill - not a dumb question at all!

There are a couple “private” upcoming sessions (like a Boy Schot troop and their parents). 

OTHERWISE, I will usually state at the bottom, “send email for the link.”

Would LOVE to “see” you either 9/2, 9/14, and/or 10/27!

Clint



On Aug 17, 2020, at 7:39 AM, AF7ZA <billnjoano@...> wrote:

Thanks for your work Clint.
I have a dumb question, but can anyone join your Zoom presentations with appropriate login & PW ?



Re: Satellite Show in Georgia (US) 8/15/2020

AF7ZA
 

Thanks for your work Clint.
I have a dumb question, but can anyone join your Zoom presentations with appropriate login & PW ?

Bill

On Aug 16, 2020, at 10:10 22PM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

>> ... K6LCS will be presenting his "Working Amateur Satellites With Your HT” session at the Saturday, August 15, 2020 meeting of the Team Radio GA in southeast Georgia. The session will begin at 9AM Georgia time ...
 
Uh, yes - that was 6AM California time ... (g)
 
We had a great time. Including THREE licensed students in attendance. A GREAT Q&A afterwards.
 
Answers for the club ...
 
-Icom ID-5100 - Yes
 
-After a successful operating period of 3 ½ years, AMSAT OSCAR-21 (RS-14), unfortunately and suddenly, fell silent on 12 October 1994. For financial reasons, the command operation of the main satellite "INFORMATOR-1", which had completed its primary mission, was completely discontinued. On 16 September the command station had already switched off all on-board systems, including active temperature and attitude control. Only the operational supply for AO-21/RS-14 remained switched on. In addition, the command system of the mother satellite was permanently deactivated. Without constant intervention of the INFORMATOR-1 ground station the mother satellite got out of control relatively fast, so that finally the power supply failed. AO-21 was never heard again since then.
 
12/10/2018 - The receiver on the newly launched Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 CubeSat seems to have suffered a receiver failure that could render the satellite unusable, AMSAT said over the weekend. Efforts continue by AMSAT Engineering to establish the cause of the problem and determine if a fix is possible. AMSAT Vice President-Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, reported over the weekend that the issue cropped up during efforts to commission Fox-1Cliff/AO-95.
 
“After a few days of tests, analysis, and discussion, it appears that Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 will not be commissioned as our fourth Fox-1 Amateur Radio satellite,” Buxton said. Commissioning began on December 4, right after the CubeSat’s successful launch a day earlier.
 
- The first D-STAR satellite QSO occurred between Michael, N3UC, FM-18 in Haymarket, Virginia and Robin, AA4RC, EM-73 in Atlanta, Georgia while working AMSAT's AO-27 microsatellite (Miniaturized satellite) in 2007. The two experienced minor difficulty with doppler shift during the QSO.
 
- It was the SPROUT microsatellite in 2014 - a project of Nihon University - that included CW telemetry, an FM digipeater, digitalker and message box, and live and preloaded SSTV pictures.
 
-The Icom ID-52 promises simultaneous reception in V/V, U/U, V/U as well as DV/DV.
 
THANK YOU to TR Georgia! More Z0om presentations coming on September 2, September 14, October 27 - and more!

Clint Bradford K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com


Re: Satellite Show in Georgia (US) 8/15/2020

Clint Bradford
 
Edited

>> ... K6LCS will be presenting his "Working Amateur Satellites With Your HT” session at the Saturday, August 15, 2020 meeting of the Team Radio GA in southeast Georgia. The session will begin at 9AM Georgia time ...
 
Uh, yes - that was 6AM California time ... (g)
 
We had a great time. Including THREE licensed students in attendance. A GREAT Q&A afterwards.
 
Answers for the club ...
 
-Icom ID-5100 - Yes
 
-After a successful operating period of 3 ½ years, AMSAT OSCAR-21 (RS-14), unfortunately and suddenly, fell silent on 12 October 1994. For financial reasons, the command operation of the main satellite "INFORMATOR-1", which had completed its primary mission, was completely discontinued. On 16 September the command station had already switched off all on-board systems, including active temperature and attitude control. Only the operational supply for AO-21/RS-14 remained switched on. In addition, the command system of the mother satellite was permanently deactivated. Without constant intervention of the INFORMATOR-1 ground station the mother satellite got out of control relatively fast, so that finally the power supply failed. AO-21 was never heard again since then.
 
- 12/10/2018 - The receiver on the newly launched Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 CubeSat seems to have suffered a receiver failure that could render the satellite unusable, AMSAT said over the weekend. Efforts continue by AMSAT Engineering to establish the cause of the problem and determine if a fix is possible. AMSAT Vice President-Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, reported over the weekend that the issue cropped up during efforts to commission Fox-1Cliff/AO-95.
 
“After a few days of tests, analysis, and discussion, it appears that Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 will not be commissioned as our fourth Fox-1 Amateur Radio satellite,” Buxton said. Commissioning began on December 4, right after the CubeSat’s successful launch a day earlier.
 
- The first D-STAR satellite QSO occurred between Michael, N3UC, FM-18 in Haymarket, Virginia and Robin, AA4RC, EM-73 in Atlanta, Georgia while working AMSAT's AO-27 microsatellite (Miniaturized satellite) in 2007. The two experienced minor difficulty with doppler shift during the QSO.
 
- It was the SPROUT microsatellite in 2014 - a project of Nihon University - that included CW telemetry, an FM digipeater, digitalker and message box, and live and preloaded SSTV pictures.
 
-The Icom ID-52 promises simultaneous reception in V/V, U/U, V/U as well as DV/DV. But, alas, is NOT full-duplex.
 
THANK YOU to TR Georgia! More Zoom presentations coming on September 2, September 14, October 27 - and more!

Clint Bradford K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com


Re: More Mac Titles from RTSystems

danny
 

WOW!!

As a forever Mac user, this is really great. Thank you to all who put these together!

Daniel
W6xx6

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