Date   
Mode Question

Brad Smith
 

Clint:

Would you please explain if the mode change on AO-92 affects an Arrow antenna user?  also, where can I find your handle modification for the Arrow antenna?

Brad Smith KC9UQR

Re: Mode Question

Clint Bradford
 
Edited

AO-92 has a 1.2GHz Uplink more - which is turned ON for about 24 hours every week or so. 

SO - you can hear its 2M downlink just fine ... but unless you have an antenna and radio capable of 1.2GHz, then you won’t make it ...

AMSAT-NA’s Twitter feed announces the changes ... and you can also watch the OSCAR Status Page to see what is being worked ...

https://www.amsat.org/status/

My Arrow “mods” are on the PHOTOS page at ...

http://www.k6lcs.com

And a couple aesthetic mods are at ...

http://work-sat.com/HAMJAM-2018.html

Re: Mode Question

Clint Bradford
 

After seeing a photo of my Arrow with a USB fan attached, a viewer asked, “Why? Why a FAN on a satellite antenna?”

It was well over 90 degrees in the shade at that event ... and iOS phones shut down when they get too hot.

The fan was keeping air flowing across my smartphone - while running a satellite tracking program.

Re: More ISS SSTV

Clint Bradford
 

From Rudy on the early-April event -

 
From the ISS of 1 and 2 April 2019, they will transmit images to SSTV as part of the Inter-MAI-75 experiment

R4UAB reports that the SSTV images will be transmitted by the Russian ISS 145,800 MHz FM service module using Kenwood TM-D710 and PD-120.


Scheduled between 1400-1900 GMT on Monday and Tuesday 1 and 2 April.

"Inter-MAI-75" - an experiment aimed at combining the efforts of educational universities and amateur radio operators in Russia and the United States to develop technology and tools in astronauts and astronauts in the study and development of the ISS management process, in addition to various methods of transmission and various types of information transmitted (text, voice and telemetry information, black and white and color photos and video from explosions, etc.), obtained by amateur radio examinations on board the ISS.

Available SSTV images transmit at a frequency of 145.800 MHz with a Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver. They are expected to use the SSTV PD-120 format.

Program:
• Monday 1 April 2019 from ~ 14:0019:00 UTC
• Tuesday 2 April 2019 from ~ 14: 0019:00 UTC


WEBSDR receiver: http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

73 of IW2BSF - Rudy

Re: More ISS SSTV

Brad Smith
 

Will this event be available in the U.S?

Brad KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad’s iPad

On Mar 26, 2019, at 3:57 PM, Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

From Rudy on the early-April event -

 
From the ISS of 1 and 2 April 2019, they will transmit images to SSTV as part of the Inter-MAI-75 experiment

R4UAB reports that the SSTV images will be transmitted by the Russian ISS 145,800 MHz FM service module using Kenwood TM-D710 and PD-120.


Scheduled between 1400-1900 GMT on Monday and Tuesday 1 and 2 April.

"Inter-MAI-75" - an experiment aimed at combining the efforts of educational universities and amateur radio operators in Russia and the United States to develop technology and tools in astronauts and astronauts in the study and development of the ISS management process, in addition to various methods of transmission and various types of information transmitted (text, voice and telemetry information, black and white and color photos and video from explosions, etc.), obtained by amateur radio examinations on board the ISS.

Available SSTV images transmit at a frequency of 145.800 MHz with a Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver. They are expected to use the SSTV PD-120 format.

Program:
• Monday 1 April 2019 from ~ 14:0019:00 UTC
• Tuesday 2 April 2019 from ~ 14: 0019:00 UTC


WEBSDR receiver: http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

73 of IW2BSF - Rudy

Re: More ISS SSTV

Fred Hillhouse
 

Hi Brad,

 

No. There is another event later is April that is planned.

 

In Orbitron, the beginning and end times can be entered for your location. I just did my location for grins and there were no passes.

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

From: Work-Sat@groups.io [mailto:Work-Sat@groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Smith via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 5:34 PM
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] More ISS SSTV

 

Will this event be available in the U.S?

 

Brad KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad’s iPad


On Mar 26, 2019, at 3:57 PM, Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

From Rudy on the early-April event -

 

From the ISS of 1 and 2 April 2019, they will transmit images to SSTV as part of the Inter-MAI-75 experiment

R4UAB reports that the SSTV images will be transmitted by the Russian ISS 145,800 MHz FM service module using Kenwood TM-D710 and PD-120.


Scheduled between 1400-1900 GMT on Monday and Tuesday 1 and 2 April.

"Inter-MAI-75" - an experiment aimed at combining the efforts of educational universities and amateur radio operators in Russia and the United States to develop technology and tools in astronauts and astronauts in the study and development of the ISS management process, in addition to various methods of transmission and various types of information transmitted (text, voice and telemetry information, black and white and color photos and video from explosions, etc.), obtained by amateur radio examinations on board the ISS.

Available SSTV images transmit at a frequency of 145.800 MHz with a Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver. They are expected to use the SSTV PD-120 format.

Program:
• Monday 1 April 2019 from ~ 14:0019:00 UTC
• Tuesday 2 April 2019 from ~ 14: 0019:00 UTC


WEBSDR receiver: http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

73 of IW2BSF - Rudy


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: More ISS SSTV

Clint Bradford
 

Original plan was for this early-April event to be for Moscow and vicinity ...

But it wouldn’t hurt to monitor ... Just in case the radio is left ON “accidentally” in between the two scheduled sessions!

Re: More ISS SSTV

Clint Bradford
 

Nothing exciting for Southern California 7am-Noon eithernif those two days ...

Source Materials

Clint Bradford
 

A discussion over on QRZ.com is talking about source materials 
for those new to the satellites.

As you research satellites, just make sure the source material is 
dated ... and don't take as gospel anything over a year old (grin).

"Theory" and "concepts" and "modes" and "antenna theory" will not 
change much over years. But when your brand new source 
(either a printed book or a Web site) does not keep itself updated, 
then you will run into cases of people trying to work satellites that 
no longer exist. 

I received an email message a year or so ago from a Boy Scout 
troop master, who was disappointed that he was not able to work AO-27 
and A0-51 for his kids one weekend, because the Web site from which
he downloaded information had a tutorial under the topic, "For Beginners" 
that INCLUDED working '27 and '51.

Unfortunately, those satellites both have been "dead" for several years ...

So, as you wander the 'Net for information, look for "Last Updated" notations.
And look for those who post contact info for quick answers. And/or support 
messageboards. Heck, a site or two even offer dedicated telephone lines for
urgent (or non-urgent!) requests. 

It is the beauty of the Internet that so much information can be made available. 
Unfortunately for those using the 'Net, many authors do not update their once-
wonderful articles ... or Webmasters many times post an article, then never follow 
with updated info or publishing "addendums" to their works. Finding DATED info 
may take a little more time - but will result in less frustration!

Clint
909-999-SATS


Re: MagPi Magazine to Feature Amateur Radio

Clint Bradford
 

Issue available - from a free .pdf to paid subscription ...

FW: [New post] UPDATE about next SSTV event

Fred Hillhouse
 

 

Micol Ivancic posted: "http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/ **UPDATE - April 3** The MAI-75 activity was a success with ground stations mainly in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America posting received copy of images. All 12 images were eventually posted to the gallery.The ne"

 

New post on ISS Fan Club

 

UPDATE about next SSTV event

by Micol Ivancic

http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

**UPDATE - April 3**
The MAI-75 activity was a success with ground stations mainly in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America posting received copy of images. All 12 images were eventually posted to the gallery.The next big event will be the ARISS SSTV event that starts Thursday, April 11 about 18:00 UTC and will be operational until about 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14. Since this event will run continuously for 72 hours, folks in the higher latitudes should have a pretty good chance to receive all 12 of the images. Operators in the mid latitudes should be able to get most of them depending on location. Good Luck and Enjoy!

 

Micol Ivancic | 3rd Apr 2019 at 4:27 pm | Categories: Communications, SSTV | URL: https://wp.me/pazzl8-re

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ARISS on Upcoming ISS SSTV Project

Clint Bradford
 

ARISS News Release No. 19-06
 
Dave Jordan, AA4KN 
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...
Russian SSTV Transmission Event Planned
 
April 6, 2019: 
 
ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions from the International Space Station. The transmissions begin Thursday, April 11, 2019 around 18:00 UTC and run continuously until approximately 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14, 2019. This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver. Once these images are received by ham radio operators and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, many participants will post them for viewing at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ . The transmissions will be broadcast at 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.
 
Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.
 
Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@..., the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status. 
 
About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.
 
Also join us on Facebook:  Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
Follow us on Twitter:  ARISS_status
 
Media Contact:
Dave Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR
aa4kn@...

Re: ARISS on Upcoming ISS SSTV Project

Clint Bradford
 

... and the award that is being made available for this SSTV session ...

https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/?fbclid=IwAR1V_sLbWxIOzkKSymaNI5kgfmQjWJ1oVr1dfN-z5hepfHsN-1UzArpfkOs

Scott and Mark Kelly Study Results

Clint Bradford
 

  April 08, 2019 
MEDIA ADVISORY M19-026 
NASA Hosts Media Teleconference to Share Twins Study Results
Former astronauts Scott Kelly and Mark Kelly
Former astronaut Scott Kelly (right), who was the Expedition 45/46 commander during his one-year mission aboard the International Space Station, along with his twin brother, former astronaut Mark Kelly (left).
Credits: NASA/ Robert Markowitz

NASA will host a media teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT Thursday, April 11, to share the results of a study – embargoed by the journal Science until that time – evaluating identical twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. A Reddit iAMA will follow the media teleconference at 4 p.m.

 

The briefing participants are:

  • Scott Kelly, retired NASA astronaut, study participant
  • Mark Kelly, retired NASA astronaut, study participant
  • Steven Platts, Ph.D., NASA Human Research Program deputy chief scientist
  • Susan M. Bailey, Ph.D., Colorado State University, principal investigator, Telomeres
  • Andrew Feinberg, MD, Johns Hopkins University, principal investigator, Epigenomics
  • Stuart M. C. Lee, Ph.D. KBRwyle, principal investigatorMetabolomics 
  • Christopher E. Mason, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, principal investigatorGene Expression
  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D., Stanford University, principal investigator, Integrative Omics

 

Teleconference audio will stream live at:

 

https://www.nasa.gov/live

 

Reporters interested in obtaining a copy of the embargoed Science study should reach out to the Science press package team at scipak@.... For reporters registered with EurekAlert!, the embargoed study also is available at: 

 

https://www.eurekalert.org/jrnls/sci/

 

The Twins Study is helping scientists better understand the impacts of spaceflight on the human body through the study of identical twins. The Twins Study research encompassed 10 separate investigators who coordinated and shared all data and analysis as one large, integrated research team. Retired astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in low-Earth orbit aboard the International Space Station while retired astronaut Mark Kelly, his identical twin, remained on Earth. The twins’ genetic similarity provided scientists with a reduced number of variables and an ideal control group, both important to scientific investigation.

 

For dial-in information, media must contact NASA’s Johnson Space Center newsroom in Houston, at 281-483-5111 no later than 1 p.m. April 11. Questions may be submitted on Twitter during the teleconference using the hashtag #askNASA. Questions can be submitted to the Reddit iAMA event when it begins at 4 p.m.

 

For more information about NASA’s Twin Study, visit:

 

https://www.nasa.gov/twins-study

 

https://www.nasa.gov/hrp

 

-end-

 

Press Contacts

 

Stephanie Schierholz
Headquarters, Washington
stephanie.schierholz@...
202-358-4997

 

Shaneequa Vereen
Johnson Space Center, Houston
shaneequa.y.vereen@...
281-483-5111

   
 

FO-29 Question

Brad Smith
 

Is there any activity on FO-29? I tried to listen to a couple of passes and heard no voices on either pass.

Brad KC9UQR

Re: FO-29 Question

Clint Bradford
 

Absolutely!!!

Mode V/U (J) Linear Transponder (Inverting):
Uplink: 145.9000 – 146.0000 MHz SSB/CW
Downlink 435.8000 – 435.9000 MHz SSB/CW

Mode U Beacon:
Downlink 435.7950 MHz CW

Mode U Digitalker (Rarely Used):
Downlink 435.9100 MHz FM

Re: FO-29 Question

Charlie
 

I'm replying to your response since I don't want to hijack this thread. Let me know if I should post this as a separate topic. I just heard FO-29 for the first time a few days ago. Copied two call signs, but not quite sure how to transmit on the linear satellites. Just recently acquired a Kenwood TS-490A. It seems as though the Inverting satellites are matched low to high on the input/output. So If I hear someone at the upper end of the band-pass on the downlink and I want to call him, should I be transmitting at the lower end of the band-pass on the uplink?

Re: FO-29 Question

Clint Bradford
 

Some great info on getting started on those satellites:

http://www.work-sat.com/SSB_CITES.html

My ISS Passes for SSTV Event

Clint Bradford
 

For So CA’s Inland Empire region ... ISS SSTV projected expected to begin April 11 at 8am local time - to 8am April 14.

Re: FO-29 Question

Brad Smith
 

Hi Charles:

So far I have not been successful with FO-29. I use an 847, which is made for satellites. One You start at mid band on both bands and you send code to the satellite and tune the 70cm band until you can hear your code. You can call CQ satellite right there. If you move to another portion of the bands, one band goes up and the other goes down. The 847 has a coupling feature that if engaged, will tune each band opposite the other, Then you have to either send code again or whistle into the mic to find the sweet spot. But I am 0 for 2, so far. Snowing today, so I didn't go out to try another pass.

Brad KC9UQR

In a message dated 4/10/2019 11:24:03 AM Central Standard Time, charles@... writes:

I'm replying to your response since I don't want to hijack this thread. Let me know if I should post this as a separate topic. I just heard FO-29 for the first time a few days ago. Copied two call signs, but not quite sure how to transmit on the linear satellites. Just recently acquired a Kenwood TS-490A. It seems as though the Inverting satellites are matched low to high on the input/output. So If I hear someone at the upper end of the band-pass on the downlink and I want to call him, should I be transmitting at the lower end of the band-pass on the uplink?