Date   
Another good handle for an Arrow antenna

David Spoelstra
 

I had a 20% off coupon so I went to Harbor Freight. Ran across a this compass saw for $3.99:

Two screws later and I have this nice handle with a wide flat top to fit against the Arrow boom. I also have two screw holes to boot that I plan to run cable ties through.
Handle only.jpg
-Daviid, N9KT

Re: Sheer Idiocity

Clint Bradford
 

Thanks, Randy, for the kind words.

For those who don't know, "Hams in Space" is the registered name of Randy's wonderful 
Web site ...

http://www.hamsinspace.com/

Bookmark it and take some time there - some great work has been accomplished over the years 
by his team!

Re: Another good handle for an Arrow antenna

Clint Bradford
 

Use some really good double-sided adhesive tape, and consider an additional Zip tie on the inside of the grip - right at where 
the arrow (pun intended) is pointing.

Clint

Re: Another good handle for an Arrow antenna

David Spoelstra
 

Yeah, I was already planning to put one there. The double sided tape is a great idea. Thanks!


On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 7:49 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Use some really good double-sided adhesive tape, and consider an additional Zip tie on the inside of the grip - right at where 
the arrow (pun intended) is pointing.

Clint

Re: Sheer Idiocity

z_ kevino <z_kevino@...>
 

You have a cool NASA meatball shirt on, Clint! 

No trees were killed in the sending of this message. However, a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced !

On Jul 8, 2018, at 16:31, Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

I know ... they really are not worth my time.

And the guy who took that photo saw exactly how I was  “workin’ the crowd” yesterday - properly and successfully.

They scream, “Clint must work full-duplex.” But when I work full-duplex AND accommodate my audience perfectly, they scream, “You shouldn’t work full-dGomez in front of a crowd ... “

They continue to prove that I am doing absolutely nothing wrong ...

And so it goes.

Clint

Re: ISS SSTV - Again?!?! YES!

Brad Smith
 

Clint:

I need your expertise. We were traveling today during an 80 degree pass of the ISS, so I hooked my VX7R ht to the 1/4 wave, 2m, whip antenna on the car roof, just for grins, in case a SSTV signal came from them. Using the SSTV app on my phone, I received a beautiful picture while traveling 75 mph. ( My XYL was driving.) If a whip antenna has a donut shaped receive pattern that mirrors the transmit pattern, it should not receive well for near vertices signals, like 80 degrees. Do you have an explanation for this? It was much better than using a 1/4 wave, 2m antenna directly attached to the ht.

Brad KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad’s iPad

On Jul 7, 2018, at 1:38 PM, Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

No idea - this was a pleasant surprise. Watch the AMSAT Live OSCAR page for reception reports! I am at HRO-Anaheim all day ...

Re: ISS SSTV - Again?!?! YES!

Clint Bradford
 

It is difficult NOT to receive 20 Watts or so lone of site! (Grin)

Of you tried to work, say, SO-50 and its 1/4 Watt signal, you would not have succeeded.

Now, then, tell us the truth: Was someone else REALLY driving???

Re: Sheer Idiocity

Clint Bradford
 

But the next wardrobe change was into a shirt from Buzz Aldrin!!!!

Re: Sheer Idiocity

Randy Schulze
 

Clint,

Thanks for the tip of the hat!

I have to  admit that I need to do some updates to the site. 


Randy Schulze
KDØHKD
Kansas City, Missouri
Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S8.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Clint Bradford via Groups.Io" <clintbradford@...>
Date: 7/8/18 6:43 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: Work-Sat@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Work-Sat] Sheer Idiocity

Thanks, Randy, for the kind words.

For those who don't know, "Hams in Space" is the registered name of Randy's wonderful 
Web site ...

http://www.hamsinspace.com/

Bookmark it and take some time there - some great work has been accomplished over the years 
by his team!

Re: ISS SSTV - Again?!?! YES!

Brad Smith
 

Thanks, Clint. Yes, the XYL was driving. We are on our way for a riverboat cruise  

Brad KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Jul 8, 2018, at 8:33 PM, Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

It is difficult NOT to receive 20 Watts or so lone of site! (Grin)

Of you tried to work, say, SO-50 and its 1/4 Watt signal, you would not have succeeded.

Now, then, tell us the truth: Was someone else REALLY driving???

Re: ISS SSTV Project UP AND RUNNING!

Brad Smith
 

I got my certificate today too. Way too cool.

Brad KC9UQR 

Sent from Brad’s iPad

On Jul 5, 2018, at 11:45 AM, Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

As usual (grin), this truly international project prepared a beautiful participation 
certificate for us. From the team ...


Hello,

Thank you for taking part in the receiving SSTV images event broadcast
from the International Space Station and for sending the report.
Images commemorated the various satellites that were deployed manually
with the ISS.

The picture on the diploma shows Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (on the left)
- Russian scientist (of Polish origin), space flight theoretician.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konstantin_Tsiolkovsky The picture also
has a "SuitSat" satellite https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SuitSat and
below the "Tanusha" satellite https://amsat-uk.org/tag/tanusha/. On
the right - russian kosmonaut Oleg Artemyev with satellite "Chasqui -
1"

The event was realized thanks to great commitment of Sergey Samburov
RV3DR from ARISS Russia and Frank Bauer KA3HDO – ARISS International
Chair, as well as many other people.

Awards are provided by ARISS Award Committee:
- Oliver DG6BCE (chair)
- Armand SP3QFE
- Francesco IK0WGF
- Larry UA6HZ
- Tatjana Kolmykova
- Bruce W6WW
- Keigo JA1KAB
- Darin VE3OIJ
- Ian VE9IM

In the attachment I am sending the "ARISS SSTV Award".


-- 
73 - Sławek SQ3OOK
ARISS SSTV Award Manager
<10663.png>

Am I Really This Old?

Clint Bradford
 

16GB USB sticks were introduced by SanDisk in the 4th quarter of 2006.

I gladly paid $199.95 for one. They were NEW, they were exciting, they were 
recognized by my then-new 17' MacBook Pro. Many other devices could 
NOT recognize such devices.

But that was 4Q 2006. TODAY, faster-speed 16GB USB sticks are available 
for less that ten bucks each. AND they have much faster read/write speeds ...

It's a wonderful time to be alive ... (grin)

Clint

Re: Am I Really This Old?

Rob McClure
 

Clint,

I know how you feel.  I was thinking about purchasing memory for a non-ham computer at the house.  16 GB for around $100 thanks to all the bitcoin mining morons out there.
Way back in the when, I remember paying that much or more for 16 MEGS of memory and thought, "Wow I'll never use all of this..."

Yep, we're old!

73, Rob, KC5RET

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 11:06 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
16GB USB sticks were introduced by SanDisk in the 4th quarter of 2006.

I gladly paid $199.95 for one. They were NEW, they were exciting, they were 
recognized by my then-new 17' MacBook Pro. Many other devices could 
NOT recognize such devices.

But that was 4Q 2006. TODAY, faster-speed 16GB USB sticks are available 
for less that ten bucks each. AND they have much faster read/write speeds ...

It's a wonderful time to be alive ... (grin)

Clint

Re: Am I Really This Old?

Randy Schulze
 

I can remember Bill Gates was a guest on a late night talk show, where he said he could not foresee any computer ever needing more than 8Gb of RAM.  I think that was around 1996 or 97.

I can remember that same era when I purchased a 2 Gb hard drive for about $200, and I was happy to get it!  The standard processor at the time was an Intel Pentium, (P-60,) also known as the "Whoops Inside" as it had issues with the internal math co-processor.

Honestly, that's back when IT was fun!  Everything was new, cutting edge, and rapidly advancing.  I really miss those days and the team I worked with.  Today, IT is just a job....

Randy Schulze
KDØHKD
Kansas City, Missouri


On 7/9/2018 7:34 AM, Rob McClure wrote:
Clint,

I know how you feel.  I was thinking about purchasing memory for a non-ham computer at the house.  16 GB for around $100 thanks to all the bitcoin mining morons out there.
Way back in the when, I remember paying that much or more for 16 MEGS of memory and thought, "Wow I'll never use all of this..."

Yep, we're old!

73, Rob, KC5RET

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 11:06 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
16GB USB sticks were introduced by SanDisk in the 4th quarter of 2006.

I gladly paid $199.95 for one. They were NEW, they were exciting, they were 
recognized by my then-new 17' MacBook Pro. Many other devices could 
NOT recognize such devices.

But that was 4Q 2006. TODAY, faster-speed 16GB USB sticks are available 
for less that ten bucks each. AND they have much faster read/write speeds ...

It's a wonderful time to be alive ... (grin)

Clint

--


Re: Am I Really This Old?

Siegfried Jackstien
 

my first pc had 4 megs ram ... a green monitor

20mb harddrive

and cpu speed was incredible 4.77 megahertz

and while my friends had only a 300 baud acoustik coupler i had a super fast 2400 baud hayes modem

dg9bfc sigi


Am 09.07.2018 um 12:34 schrieb Rob McClure:

Clint,

I know how you feel.  I was thinking about purchasing memory for a non-ham computer at the house.  16 GB for around $100 thanks to all the bitcoin mining morons out there.
Way back in the when, I remember paying that much or more for 16 MEGS of memory and thought, "Wow I'll never use all of this..."

Yep, we're old!

73, Rob, KC5RET

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 11:06 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
16GB USB sticks were introduced by SanDisk in the 4th quarter of 2006.

I gladly paid $199.95 for one. They were NEW, they were exciting, they were 
recognized by my then-new 17' MacBook Pro. Many other devices could 
NOT recognize such devices.

But that was 4Q 2006. TODAY, faster-speed 16GB USB sticks are available 
for less that ten bucks each. AND they have much faster read/write speeds ...

It's a wonderful time to be alive ... (grin)

Clint

Re: Another good handle for an Arrow antenna

Siegfried Jackstien
 

use the double sided tape that is used for mounting mirrors in the bathroom (with the small foam layer in between)

that sticks very good and has some flexiness

dg9bfc sigi

Am 08.07.2018 um 23:58 schrieb David Spoelstra:

Yeah, I was already planning to put one there. The double sided tape is a great idea. Thanks!

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 7:49 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Use some really good double-sided adhesive tape, and consider an additional Zip tie on the inside of the grip - right at where 
the arrow (pun intended) is pointing.

Clint

Re: Another good handle for an Arrow antenna

Randy Schulze
 

This is what I had for my first PC:  The COMPAQ Lugable!

This one pictured here is not one of my actual computers, but I still own two of them!  This was the grand-father to the laptop, and was the subject of the ground breaking law suite between COMPAQ and IBM which broke the monopoly on companies other than IBM being allowed to manufacture and sell PC computers with the Intel 8088 chip set and it's successors.  PC, (Personal Computer,) was after all, an IBM brand name.

These came with a 10 Mb Hard Drive, and a 5.25 Inch Floppy Drive.  Both of mine had the "Expansion Board" which included more memory and a Serial / COM Port.  The memory consisted of several rows of 64 bit IC chips, (Remember the Commodore 64?  It used one of these same chips,) any of which would blow on occasion, causing a parity error at boot.  I would keep a medicine bottle containing extra chips to make repairs when this happened.  I networked the two computers together via the COM Port and a Null Modem Cable.  This allowed not only file sharing and messaging, but also allowed me to execute programs from one machine or the other.

The screen on this example is showing XTREE.  This application, and it's successor, XTREE Gold was the world's BEST DOS utility.  You could run it from the hard drive, or from a floppy disk.  Before the start of my IT career, and for the first few years as an IT Professional, XTREE was the most commonly used tool in my bag of tricks.  I used it well into the Windows 95 era.

Randy Schulze
KDØHKD
Kansas City, Missouri



On 7/9/2018 11:29 AM, Siegfried Jackstien wrote:

use the double sided tape that is used for mounting mirrors in the bathroom (with the small foam layer in between)

that sticks very good and has some flexiness

dg9bfc sigi

Am 08.07.2018 um 23:58 schrieb David Spoelstra:
Yeah, I was already planning to put one there. The double sided tape is a great idea. Thanks!

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 7:49 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Use some really good double-sided adhesive tape, and consider an additional Zip tie on the inside of the grip - right at where 
the arrow (pun intended) is pointing.

Clint


--


Re: Another good handle for an Arrow antenna

Siegfried Jackstien
 

in dos days norton commander ... now windows commander ... swiss army knife

dg9bfc sigi


Am 09.07.2018 um 16:59 schrieb Randy Schulze:

This is what I had for my first PC:  The COMPAQ Lugable!

This one pictured here is not one of my actual computers, but I still own two of them!  This was the grand-father to the laptop, and was the subject of the ground breaking law suite between COMPAQ and IBM which broke the monopoly on companies other than IBM being allowed to manufacture and sell PC computers with the Intel 8088 chip set and it's successors.  PC, (Personal Computer,) was after all, an IBM brand name.

These came with a 10 Mb Hard Drive, and a 5.25 Inch Floppy Drive.  Both of mine had the "Expansion Board" which included more memory and a Serial / COM Port.  The memory consisted of several rows of 64 bit IC chips, (Remember the Commodore 64?  It used one of these same chips,) any of which would blow on occasion, causing a parity error at boot.  I would keep a medicine bottle containing extra chips to make repairs when this happened.  I networked the two computers together via the COM Port and a Null Modem Cable.  This allowed not only file sharing and messaging, but also allowed me to execute programs from one machine or the other.

The screen on this example is showing XTREE.  This application, and it's successor, XTREE Gold was the world's BEST DOS utility.  You could run it from the hard drive, or from a floppy disk.  Before the start of my IT career, and for the first few years as an IT Professional, XTREE was the most commonly used tool in my bag of tricks.  I used it well into the Windows 95 era.

Randy Schulze
KDØHKD
Kansas City, Missouri



On 7/9/2018 11:29 AM, Siegfried Jackstien wrote:

use the double sided tape that is used for mounting mirrors in the bathroom (with the small foam layer in between)

that sticks very good and has some flexiness

dg9bfc sigi

Am 08.07.2018 um 23:58 schrieb David Spoelstra:
Yeah, I was already planning to put one there. The double sided tape is a great idea. Thanks!

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 7:49 PM Clint Bradford via Groups.Io <clintbradford=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Use some really good double-sided adhesive tape, and consider an additional Zip tie on the inside of the grip - right at where 
the arrow (pun intended) is pointing.

Clint


--



HamJam '18 Photographs

Clint Bradford
 

Just posted a few photographs from Ham Radio Outlet - Anaheim's Ham Jam festivities last Saturday!

http://work-sat.com/HAMJAM-2018.html

And attached here is a much better photographs of working a satellite outside with an audience. I am 
wearing a headset, so that my transmitted signal while working full-duplex won't cause feedback in 
my transmitted signal. But you see in the background a few folks surrounding another satellite antenna 
setup - receiving only. THEY were able to hear everything. 

We had a blast!

Screenshot courtesy of this great ham who made a 12-minute video of the event. Watch it here:

https://youtu.be/drGpxtPv_xU

Workin' the Crowd

Clint Bradford
 

A friend videotaped the HamJam and made a great video that you can view at ...

https://youtu.be/drGpxtPv_xU

Some malcontent somewhere didn't like my sat demo technique, writing somewhere that I was wearing a headset. 
Correct! Working full duplex is the ideal way to work the FM birds. NOT mandatory, but when it is crazy busy on 
the birds like it is on the weekends, it is nice to know you aren't accidentally stepping on anyone else.

But the caption further stated, “Clint stupidly is working full-duplex with a headset - no one can hear 
the downlink when he wears a headset! What's the point of demonstrating like that?”

Well, check out the attached photo. Look in the background. See the other sat station being held by an attendee?

I had three antenna/radio setups with me - all programmed for the birds - and I always choose an “assistant” from the gathering to use one of them. THEY were tuned in and hearing the downlink just fine, as I planned. No one missed a thing. And by separating ourselves  by that approximately 20 feet, I was not introducing audio feedback in to my transmitted uplink.

Others took more videos showing how easy it is to hold and maneuver an Arrow antenna when you counter-balance it and add an ergonomically correct handle to it. I am sure he will post them soon - for the betterment of sat operators everywhere.

Same guy videotapes successful contacts we made, too. Sure those will be posted quickly, also.

And so it goes ...

PS Picked up THREE more dates for satellite presentations yesterday! One a return visit ... the other two for my first time to their clubs.