Date   

Satellite Presentation for YOUR Club!

Clint Bradford
 

>> … Do you record your Zoom meetings? May we have a copy?

Several of the 100+ (so far!) presentations have been recorded, yes - but 
much in each is customized to the group to whom I am speaking.

Better yet - let's set a date for a presentation for your club!

https://www.work-sat.com/miscellaneous.html

The presentations are well-received (pun intended). From my 
in-box:

"I wanted to take a moment to personally thank you for the
wonderful presentation this evening at the Pasadena (CA)
Radio Club. It was one of the very BEST presentations we
have had [a 50-year-old club!] and you did a masterful job
in presenting the material and making it fun at the same
time. I am sure the presentation motivated many of our
club members to get active in working the FM satellites."

- and -

Please let me thank you (and Karen) for an AWESOME
and entertaining presentation. You are one of those very
positive examples of people in this hobby that makes it
so great. Your presentation was informative and very
entertaining, 
and, with the assistance of your wife, Karen,
it was run 
error-free. Our team would highly recommend
this presentation to 
anyone exploring Amateur Radio Satellites.

Jerome Erickson – KK1JE
TeamRadioGA - Radio with Purpose!
GA Southeast District AuxComm/ARES

Clint Bradford K6LCS
909-999-SATS (7287)

PS - No, I am not related to Jerome. But I -will- add him to my 
holiday card mailing list ... (g)


M2 LEO pack circular polarized antennas versus vertically polarized antennas

Don Solberg
 

I just set up a satellite base station with a Cushcraft dual band antenna on the top of my tower, at 82 feet.  I live in a pine forest so this is the only way that I could get a view of the sky.  To compensate for UHF coax loss I am using an SSB mast mounted preamp. I installed a diplexer as a 2M desense filter but even with that I am experiencing desense on the 70 CM downlink so I can't hear my uplink transmission.

I am going to mount the antennas on a fiberglass cross boam and was wondering if there would be a significant improvement if I went with the M2 LEO pack circular polarization antennas or stayed with two vertically polarized antennas.

Does anyone have any experience with the M2 LEO pack?

73,

Don K9AQ


AMSAT-NA Ambassadors

Clint Bradford
 
Edited

So you have the "satellite bug." You want to tell others about your 
experiences getting on the "birds." You have enthusiasm and some
volunteer energy to give to the amateur radio community ...

Take a look at the AMSAT-NA Ambassador program!

https://www.amsat.org/ambassador/

Start with your local club(s). Have they had a satellite speaker/presentation 
recently? Probably not since the new ISS ham equipment was commissioned 
last September! They NEED your information and experiences!

You will have support of fellow AMSAT Ambassadors all the way! From 
presentation preparation to scheduling to - well, just about ANY obstacle 
can be met and overcome with AMSAT's support!

https://www.work-sat.com/presentations.html

Need more information? I am available via email and phone:

https://www.work-sat.com/contact.html

Or please send an email message to Robert Bankston, KE4AL,
Director, AMSAT Ambassadors:  ambassadors AT amsat DOT org

Share your passion - support AMSAT-NA: Consider becoming 
an AMSAT Ambassador!

Clint Bradford K6LCS
909-999-SATS (7287)


ISS SSTV Project!

Clint Bradford
 

November 20: a Moscow Aviation Institute (MAI-75) SSTV event is currently scheduled to begin on Tuesday, December 1 starting at 12:30 UTC, ending at 18:25 UTC and again on Wednesday, December 2 starting at 11:50 UTC and ending at 18:25 UTC. 

Listen for SSTV signals to be downlinked at 145.800 MHz +/- Doppler shift. 

The mode of transmission is expected to be PD 120. 

These times will allow for one pass over the Eastern USA near the end of the scheduled times. Received images of reasonable quality can be posted at the ARISS SSTV Gallery at ...

https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

Any future updates on this event will be posted on ARISS’ Facebook page and on their Twitter account at ARISS_status.


Re: Great Information

Clint Bradford
 

I am reminded of a Gmail add-on: After toy composed an email and hit SEND, it would "delay" sending for 5 or 10 minutes ...

In case you, well, changed your mind ... (g)

Many a time I will ask publicly for something - then remember where the info was just a few minutes afterwards ...


Re: ZOOM Session Yucca Valley

Clint Bradford
 

I apologize - the Yucca Valley presentation  was intentionally not promoted "nationally." 

Clint


Re: ZOOM Session Yucca Valley

Dan Romanchik KB6NU
 

I'm just seeing this now as I get the daily digest. If you could post these more than a day in advance, perhaps more people could join the meeting.


ZOOM Session Yucca Valley

Clint Bradford
 

From Monte Andress - 

Greetings Radio Friends,

Tuesday evening November 17, 2920 at 7:00pm PST, an exciting and informative Zoom meeting will take place. For you new hams consider this meeting to be an important first part of your Ham Boot Camp. Sponsored by The Yucaipa Valley Amateur Radio Club, the meeting will be conducted by Clint Bradford, K6LCS. Clint is a greatly experienced and highly respected authority on using 2 meter / 70 centimeter hand-held radios for satellite communications. His presentations are much in demand and we are very fortunate to have him with us on Zoom. 

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE ZOOM PROGRAM ON YOUR COMPUTER. [To get Zoom, Google Zoom and follow the instructions] I will send out instructions for how to connect with the meeting.

Using your HT with a $10 easy to build directional antenna YOU CAN, with a minimal investment, talk through the International Space Station (ISS).  NASA takes ham radio seriously.

NASA and the SpaceX-Dragon project just launched four individuals toward the ISS. They are ham-astronauts Michael Hopkins KF5LJG, Victor Glover KI5BKC, Soichi Noguchi KD5TVP, and Shannon Walker KD5DXB (Most astronauts are hams). They will be on ISS for the better part of 6 months so we hope for opportunities to have QSOs with these orbiting hams.

See you tomorrow on Zoom.



Great Information

Howard
 

They say there is no such thing as a stupid question. I was about to disprove that, but then I remembered the old adage about listen before you speak. 5 minutes perusal of this site answered my questions and a few I didn't know I had.

Howard AE0Z


Re: Dealing with doppler for newb...

Howard
 

That really had me puzzled, the reversed doppler adjustment, so thanks for the explanation!

Howard AE0Z 


Re: Neutron-1 Deployment 11/5

Clint Bradford
 

Nor do I have that knowledge ... 

I will pass on any info I find.

I have been told, though, that we might have the ISS crossband repeater back up in a couple weeks!


Re: Neutron-1 Deployment 11/5

Stefan Wagener
 

So far there has not been any confirmed reception reports. It looks like another (unfortunately) dead satellite at this point.

73, Stefan VE4SW

On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 9:58 AM AF7ZA <billnjoano@...> wrote:
Thanks Clint. A fellow sat operator K7IW informed me that BPSK is upper side band and not FM. I had no way of knowing. He suggested I use my RSP1 SDR to decode it then feed the audio into UZ7HO to see it.
It certainly is not as simple as working a FM bird.
I was hoping to find information telling what equipment is needed to decode this satellite, but a certain amount of prior knowledge is required which I don’t possess…yet.

Bill

On Nov 15, 2020, at 11:12 23AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

Here’s Gunter’s info ... I will do some more digging ...





On Nov 15, 2020, at 09:02, AF7ZA <billnjoano@...> wrote:

Clint.
On a whim I thought I’d try to see if I could receive beacons from this Satellite. I finally found and imported the TLE into Gpredict so at least I can track it.
I can’t seem to find it listed on clestrak nor any other Amateur radio satellite listing. No NORAD number either.And more importantly, I can’t find out what software to use should I be able to actually hear it beacon as it flies over.
A letter to W1HJK Dave (FLdigi),tells me that BPSK 1200 is not supported by FLdigi. I was hoping to use my Mac to decode, but I do have UZ7HO on a PC but haven’t tried that yet.

Has anyone received beacons from this, and how did you do it ?

Your thoughts ?
Bill

On Nov 4, 2020, at 6:14 46AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

The 3-U Neutron-1 CubeSat is scheduled for deployment from the International Space Station (ISS) on November 5 at 10:40 UTC. For the satellite’s first month and during its commissioning phase, the Neutron-1 beacon will transmit 1,200 bps BPSK telemetry every 60 seconds on 435.300 MHz. Developed by the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), the satellite’s payload includes a VU FM amateur radio repeater during available times and according to the spacecraft’s power budget. The Neutron-1 science mission is spelled out in a formal paper, Neutron-1 Mission: Low Earth Orbit Neutron Flux Detection and COSMOS Mission Operations Technology Demonstration.

HSFL operates and maintains a satellite UHF, VHF, and L/S-band amateur radio ground station at Kauai Community College.

The primary mission of Neutron-1 is to measure low-energy neutron flux in low-Earth orbit (LEO). The science payload, a small neutron detector developed by Arizona State University, will focus on measurements of low-energy secondary neutrons — a component of the LEO neutron environment.

A number of other amateur radio satellites are expected to launch or be deployed in the next few months. AMSAT’s RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) is expected to go into orbit by year’s end on Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne vehicle. RadFxSat-2 carries a 30 kHz wide VU linear transponder.

The Tevel Mission — a series of eight Israeli 1U CubeSats, each carrying a UV FM transponder — is expected to launch from India on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in December. Also from the Herzliya Science Center is a 3U CubeSat called Tausat-1, which is scheduled to launch on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ISS resupply mission in February for subsequent deployment. Tausat-1 carries an FM transponder.

AMSAT-Spain (AMSAT-EA) reports that its PocketQubes, EASAT-2, and HADES, have been integrated for launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in December, while GENESIS-L and GENESIS-N have been integrated for launch on Firefly’s Alpha rocket.

In other amateur satellite news, Jérôme LeCuyer, F4DXV, set yet another record, this time via EO-88, on October 28, working Vladimir Vassiljev, R9LR, at a distance of 4,560 kilometers (2,827 miles). F4DXV is now a distance-record contact partner on 10 LEO satellites, while R9LR is a contact partner for records set on four LEO satellites. AMSAT tracks claimed distance records. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service 




Re: Neutron-1 Deployment 11/5

AF7ZA
 

Thanks Clint. A fellow sat operator K7IW informed me that BPSK is upper side band and not FM. I had no way of knowing. He suggested I use my RSP1 SDR to decode it then feed the audio into UZ7HO to see it.
It certainly is not as simple as working a FM bird.
I was hoping to find information telling what equipment is needed to decode this satellite, but a certain amount of prior knowledge is required which I don’t possess…yet.

Bill

On Nov 15, 2020, at 11:12 23AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

Here’s Gunter’s info ... I will do some more digging ...





On Nov 15, 2020, at 09:02, AF7ZA <billnjoano@...> wrote:

Clint.
On a whim I thought I’d try to see if I could receive beacons from this Satellite. I finally found and imported the TLE into Gpredict so at least I can track it.
I can’t seem to find it listed on clestrak nor any other Amateur radio satellite listing. No NORAD number either.And more importantly, I can’t find out what software to use should I be able to actually hear it beacon as it flies over.
A letter to W1HJK Dave (FLdigi),tells me that BPSK 1200 is not supported by FLdigi. I was hoping to use my Mac to decode, but I do have UZ7HO on a PC but haven’t tried that yet.

Has anyone received beacons from this, and how did you do it ?

Your thoughts ?
Bill

On Nov 4, 2020, at 6:14 46AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

The 3-U Neutron-1 CubeSat is scheduled for deployment from the International Space Station (ISS) on November 5 at 10:40 UTC. For the satellite’s first month and during its commissioning phase, the Neutron-1 beacon will transmit 1,200 bps BPSK telemetry every 60 seconds on 435.300 MHz. Developed by the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), the satellite’s payload includes a VU FM amateur radio repeater during available times and according to the spacecraft’s power budget. The Neutron-1 science mission is spelled out in a formal paper, Neutron-1 Mission: Low Earth Orbit Neutron Flux Detection and COSMOS Mission Operations Technology Demonstration.

HSFL operates and maintains a satellite UHF, VHF, and L/S-band amateur radio ground station at Kauai Community College.

The primary mission of Neutron-1 is to measure low-energy neutron flux in low-Earth orbit (LEO). The science payload, a small neutron detector developed by Arizona State University, will focus on measurements of low-energy secondary neutrons — a component of the LEO neutron environment.

A number of other amateur radio satellites are expected to launch or be deployed in the next few months. AMSAT’s RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) is expected to go into orbit by year’s end on Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne vehicle. RadFxSat-2 carries a 30 kHz wide VU linear transponder.

The Tevel Mission — a series of eight Israeli 1U CubeSats, each carrying a UV FM transponder — is expected to launch from India on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in December. Also from the Herzliya Science Center is a 3U CubeSat called Tausat-1, which is scheduled to launch on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ISS resupply mission in February for subsequent deployment. Tausat-1 carries an FM transponder.

AMSAT-Spain (AMSAT-EA) reports that its PocketQubes, EASAT-2, and HADES, have been integrated for launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in December, while GENESIS-L and GENESIS-N have been integrated for launch on Firefly’s Alpha rocket.

In other amateur satellite news, Jérôme LeCuyer, F4DXV, set yet another record, this time via EO-88, on October 28, working Vladimir Vassiljev, R9LR, at a distance of 4,560 kilometers (2,827 miles). F4DXV is now a distance-record contact partner on 10 LEO satellites, while R9LR is a contact partner for records set on four LEO satellites. AMSAT tracks claimed distance records. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service 




Re: SpaceX Launch Delayed - Weather

Clint Bradford
 

The four astronauts now heading to the ISS are all amateur radio operators!

Hopkins, Michael KF5LJG
Glover, Victor KI5BKC
Noguchi, Soichi KD5TVP
Walker, Shannon KD5DXB

We just might have the crossband repeater activated in about two weeks ...


Re: SARCNET Software

Andrew Stephens
 

Well, I was able to reach out to the author of the site shortly after posting this original message—which posted with some delay. He was able to provide the rotator files and I utilize the rest with N4MACKs build a pi project. 


Re: SpaceX Launch Delayed - Weather

Clint Bradford
 

T MINUS TWO HOURS, THIRTY-FIVE MINUTES ...

http://www.nasa.gov


SARCNET Software

Andrew Stephens
 

Good evening; I've sourced most of my parts and thought that I read the software image was available for download somewhere. I have not been able to locate it, however. Does anyone know where I can find the Raspberry Pi download for the mk4?


73s
Andrew 
N8ADK


Re: Neutron-1 Deployment 11/5

Clint Bradford
 

Here’s Gunter’s info ... I will do some more digging ...

On Nov 15, 2020, at 09:02, AF7ZA <billnjoano@...> wrote:

Clint.
On a whim I thought I’d try to see if I could receive beacons from this Satellite. I finally found and imported the TLE into Gpredict so at least I can track it.
I can’t seem to find it listed on clestrak nor any other Amateur radio satellite listing. No NORAD number either.And more importantly, I can’t find out what software to use should I be able to actually hear it beacon as it flies over.
A letter to W1HJK Dave (FLdigi),tells me that BPSK 1200 is not supported by FLdigi. I was hoping to use my Mac to decode, but I do have UZ7HO on a PC but haven’t tried that yet.

Has anyone received beacons from this, and how did you do it ?

Your thoughts ?
Bill

On Nov 4, 2020, at 6:14 46AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

The 3-U Neutron-1 CubeSat is scheduled for deployment from the International Space Station (ISS) on November 5 at 10:40 UTC. For the satellite’s first month and during its commissioning phase, the Neutron-1 beacon will transmit 1,200 bps BPSK telemetry every 60 seconds on 435.300 MHz. Developed by the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), the satellite’s payload includes a VU FM amateur radio repeater during available times and according to the spacecraft’s power budget. The Neutron-1 science mission is spelled out in a formal paper, Neutron-1 Mission: Low Earth Orbit Neutron Flux Detection and COSMOS Mission Operations Technology Demonstration.

HSFL operates and maintains a satellite UHF, VHF, and L/S-band amateur radio ground station at Kauai Community College.

The primary mission of Neutron-1 is to measure low-energy neutron flux in low-Earth orbit (LEO). The science payload, a small neutron detector developed by Arizona State University, will focus on measurements of low-energy secondary neutrons — a component of the LEO neutron environment.

A number of other amateur radio satellites are expected to launch or be deployed in the next few months. AMSAT’s RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) is expected to go into orbit by year’s end on Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne vehicle. RadFxSat-2 carries a 30 kHz wide VU linear transponder.

The Tevel Mission — a series of eight Israeli 1U CubeSats, each carrying a UV FM transponder — is expected to launch from India on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in December. Also from the Herzliya Science Center is a 3U CubeSat called Tausat-1, which is scheduled to launch on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ISS resupply mission in February for subsequent deployment. Tausat-1 carries an FM transponder.

AMSAT-Spain (AMSAT-EA) reports that its PocketQubes, EASAT-2, and HADES, have been integrated for launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in December, while GENESIS-L and GENESIS-N have been integrated for launch on Firefly’s Alpha rocket.

In other amateur satellite news, Jérôme LeCuyer, F4DXV, set yet another record, this time via EO-88, on October 28, working Vladimir Vassiljev, R9LR, at a distance of 4,560 kilometers (2,827 miles). F4DXV is now a distance-record contact partner on 10 LEO satellites, while R9LR is a contact partner for records set on four LEO satellites. AMSAT tracks claimed distance records. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service 



Re: Neutron-1 Deployment 11/5

AF7ZA
 

Clint.
On a whim I thought I’d try to see if I could receive beacons from this Satellite. I finally found and imported the TLE into Gpredict so at least I can track it.
I can’t seem to find it listed on clestrak nor any other Amateur radio satellite listing. No NORAD number either.And more importantly, I can’t find out what software to use should I be able to actually hear it beacon as it flies over.
A letter to W1HJK Dave (FLdigi),tells me that BPSK 1200 is not supported by FLdigi. I was hoping to use my Mac to decode, but I do have UZ7HO on a PC but haven’t tried that yet.

Has anyone received beacons from this, and how did you do it ?

Your thoughts ?
Bill

On Nov 4, 2020, at 6:14 46AM, Clint Bradford via groups.io <clintbradford@...> wrote:

The 3-U Neutron-1 CubeSat is scheduled for deployment from the International Space Station (ISS) on November 5 at 10:40 UTC. For the satellite’s first month and during its commissioning phase, the Neutron-1 beacon will transmit 1,200 bps BPSK telemetry every 60 seconds on 435.300 MHz. Developed by the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), the satellite’s payload includes a VU FM amateur radio repeater during available times and according to the spacecraft’s power budget. The Neutron-1 science mission is spelled out in a formal paper, Neutron-1 Mission: Low Earth Orbit Neutron Flux Detection and COSMOS Mission Operations Technology Demonstration.

HSFL operates and maintains a satellite UHF, VHF, and L/S-band amateur radio ground station at Kauai Community College.

The primary mission of Neutron-1 is to measure low-energy neutron flux in low-Earth orbit (LEO). The science payload, a small neutron detector developed by Arizona State University, will focus on measurements of low-energy secondary neutrons — a component of the LEO neutron environment.

A number of other amateur radio satellites are expected to launch or be deployed in the next few months. AMSAT’s RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) is expected to go into orbit by year’s end on Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne vehicle. RadFxSat-2 carries a 30 kHz wide VU linear transponder.

The Tevel Mission — a series of eight Israeli 1U CubeSats, each carrying a UV FM transponder — is expected to launch from India on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in December. Also from the Herzliya Science Center is a 3U CubeSat called Tausat-1, which is scheduled to launch on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ISS resupply mission in February for subsequent deployment. Tausat-1 carries an FM transponder.

AMSAT-Spain (AMSAT-EA) reports that its PocketQubes, EASAT-2, and HADES, have been integrated for launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in December, while GENESIS-L and GENESIS-N have been integrated for launch on Firefly’s Alpha rocket.

In other amateur satellite news, Jérôme LeCuyer, F4DXV, set yet another record, this time via EO-88, on October 28, working Vladimir Vassiljev, R9LR, at a distance of 4,560 kilometers (2,827 miles). F4DXV is now a distance-record contact partner on 10 LEO satellites, while R9LR is a contact partner for records set on four LEO satellites. AMSAT tracks claimed distance records. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service 



20 Years!

Clint Bradford
 

ARISS:  Celebrating 20 Years of Continuous Operations on ISS!!
 
November 13, 2020—Twenty years ago today, the Expedition-1 crew turned on the ARISS Ericsson radio for the first time and completed several contacts with ARISS ground stations around the world to validate the radio communications system.  These inaugural contacts launched an incredible two-decade operations journey on ISS, enabling ARISS to inspire, engage and educate our next generation of explorers and provide the ham radio community a platform for lifelong learning and experimentation. 
 
In celebration of the ISS 20th anniversary, ARISS was part of an ISS Research and Development Conference Panel session entitled “20 years of STEM Experiments on the ISS.”  The video below, developed for this panel session, describes our program, celebrates our 20th anniversary, conveys some key lessons learned over the past 20 years and describes the ARISS team’s vision for the future.  Enjoy watching!
 
20 years of continuous operations is a phenomenal accomplishment.  But what makes it even more extraordinary is that ARISS has achieved this through hundreds of volunteers that are passionate in “paying it forward” to our youth and ham radio community.  On behalf of the ARISS International team, I would like to express our heartfelt thanks to every volunteer that has made ARISS such an amazing success over the past 20 years. Your passion, drive, creativity and spirit made it happen!!
 
Congratulations ARISS team!!!
 
Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ARISS International Chair