Date   

Re: Rev. Battle

Ross Hunter <xhunter@...>
 

Other WJMA memories that have come back to me while reading this list
...

- Russ, remember the 'bagpipe player' who obviously frequented the
Orioles games we aired? Strange, I never saw him during my visits to
Memorial Stadium. :-) (You'll be glad to know I reprised that antic
years later at WAYB in Waynesboro ... we may have even had the same
sound effects library)
David, Russ...

What's the bagpipe player story? I never heard that one.

Ross


Re: and that reminds me....

Mark Johnson
 

--- David Taylor <taylordr@...> wrote:
- Remember "Radio Orange weather for Madison, Burr
Hill and Quinque"
Yes!

And that reminds me of something else. LIPS!

A. 64 oz bottle of Plumaid, 99 cents at Pratts Grocery
in Pratts!
B. 4 rolls of Bounty paper towels 1.69 at Pratts
Grocery, in Pratts.
etc etc

Mark Johnson
1981-1984


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Re: Rev. Battle

David Taylor
 

I, too, had the Sunday a.m. shift for a good while (maybe a year and a half? ... memory fails), but I think I actually saw Elder Battle about six times during that time. When he did show it was in a Cadillac that barely fit in the spacious WJMA parking lot. He always seemed to have quite an entourage ... maybe most of his congregation? Anyway, when he didn't show, I was a very uncomfortable 15-year-old white country boy trying to host a black gospel show -- boy, was I a mess when he called to remind me not to forget the prayer!

Other WJMA memories that have come back to me while reading this list ...

- Russ, remember the 'bagpipe player' who obviously frequented the Orioles games we aired? Strange, I never saw him during my visits to Memorial Stadium. :-) (You'll be glad to know I reprised that antic years later at WAYB in Waynesboro ... we may have even had the same sound effects library)

- The Sunday night "Airline" program was ahead of its time and didn't get a lot of calls. But one call I'll never forget came from a female acquaintance of mine. She told Russ that I could "moo like a cow." Russ, of course, couldn't let that go, and eventually got me to imitate a Guernsey on the air ... yep, that led to a fine Monday morning at OCHS!

- Anybody remember the annual opening of the WJMA swimming pool? Wish we had a tape of that!

- Remember "Radio Orange weather for Madison, Burr Hill and Quinque"

And, for now, just one other that somebody needs to confirm ... I only know about it second hand. Before I left to go to college, I did OCHS basketball play-by-play. Phil Goodwin worked with me. I was supposed to "break him in" (kinda the blind leading the blind at that time) so he could take over the games the following season. The next year I asked how Phil was doing. Seems on his first game Phil didn't receive a team roster from Orange's opponent -- William Monroe. So the players on the floor became Bill Monroe, Willie Monroe, Billy Monroe, etc.

That's all for me for now ... keep the stories coming!!

David Taylor
Bridgewater, Va.
WJMA alum 1975-78


Re: Christmas Music

Mark Johnson
 

--- Seth Williamson <seth@...> wrote:
Another yearly reminder of Arch's influence was his
approach to
Christmas programming, where he also swam against
the current.
Speaking of Christmas music, I recall that each year
just before Dec. 25th, Arch would host a show devoted
entirely to one composer. I think his name was Burt,
but I could be mistaken.

It may have been in the Monday At One time slot. I
know I heard it several times. It was another of the
nice traditions from The Golden Era.

Mark Johnson
1981-1984



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Re: Rev. Battle

R Roberts <russroberts@...>
 

As these memories flood back about the years at the station in general
and Brother Battle in particular, I remember he used to pray often. He
would say he was going to pray, remind us of the importance of prayer,
thank Jesus for the opportunity to pray and then pray ... "for you and
you and you."

Russ Roberts

P.S. This on-line "Chautaugua" we're having here reminds me of a Ken
Burns documentary without pictures. Cripes! I almost signed my name
"Mary Chestnut!"

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Johnson [mailto:rmj142@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 8:13 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: RE: [WJMA] Rev. Battle

lol

Yes, I remember it well.

Rev. Battle was still going strong when I was there.

None of his records had jackets of any kind. He would
just carry them around mashed together and adding
scratches.

Some of the songs were longgggggggg. We are talking
12-13 minutes. When Rev. Battle had heard enough he
would give you the high sign and "Rrrrp!" end of song.

Some weeks the light bulb connected to the doorbell
would blink and there would be a friend of the Rev.
with a stack of records, and a litle note with the cut
off each album to play.

A fine old fellow who I am sure is many years in the
grave by now.

Mark Johnson
1981-1984


--- R Roberts <russroberts@...> wrote:
Anncr: "It's time now for the Bibleway Spiritual
Tidings Program with
the Elder Bernard Battle from The Bibleway Church in
Trevilians.


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Re: Rev. Battle

Mark Johnson
 

lol

Yes, I remember it well.

Rev. Battle was still going strong when I was there.

None of his records had jackets of any kind. He would
just carry them around mashed together and adding
scratches.

Some of the songs were longgggggggg. We are talking
12-13 minutes. When Rev. Battle had heard enough he
would give you the high sign and "Rrrrp!" end of song.

Some weeks the light bulb connected to the doorbell
would blink and there would be a friend of the Rev.
with a stack of records, and a litle note with the cut
off each album to play.

A fine old fellow who I am sure is many years in the
grave by now.

Mark Johnson
1981-1984


--- R Roberts <russroberts@...> wrote:
Anncr: "It's time now for the Bibleway Spiritual
Tidings Program with
the Elder Bernard Battle from The Bibleway Church in
Trevilians.


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Re: Swap Shop

Les <grandmananer@...>
 

Hi Ben- Les Myers here. I recall hosting a "Monday at One" on which you
and someone else appeared. I can't remember the subject not who your
co-guest was, but I recall you were EXTREMELY nervous. I don't know why;
perhaps it was my intimidating and pit bull hosting style (ha). Perhaps
you were concerned about the calls you would receive from listeners (I
don't remember if that was something we could technologically do back
then). In any event, thanks for the reminder about The Swap Shop. How
could I forget Pat Watson gearing up daily for the calls that would come
in from people trying to sell (sayle) STUFF!


On Tue, 21 Jan 2003 19:11:05 -0500, "ben and kathy hargett"
<xhunter@...> said:

Ross ,
I still remember when Phil Goodwin first came here from
"Yankee" country and was totally unfamiliar with "southernese." A
gentleman called in to Swap shop
with a very deep southern accent wanting to sell a "power
saw" Phil took this to be "parasol" and could not fathom
why in the world the caller could ask $175 for a used
"power saw/parasol" Yes, those were the days!
Regards,
Ben Hargett

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--
http://fastmail.fm - mmm... fastmail...


Swap Shop

ben and kathy hargett <xhunter@...>
 

Ross ,
I still remember when Phil Goodwin first came here from
"Yankee" country and was totally unfamiliar with "southernese." A gentleman called in to Swap shop
with a very deep southern accent wanting to sell a "power
saw" Phil took this to be "parasol" and could not fathom
why in the world the caller could ask $175 for a used
"power saw/parasol" Yes, those were the days!
Regards,
Ben Hargett


Re: those not here

Bill-Joan Hager <bill-joanhager@...>
 

Thanks Ross! Hope things are well with you and the family. Bill

-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter [mailto:xhunter@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2003 7:44 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] those not here


Here is a list of those who have died. At least those that I am aware
of. When I get finished with the data entry, I'll post a list of
those I could not locate.

Ross Hunter
-------------------------------------

Bob Barnett , 1974-19??
Gene Bossieux , 1962-19??
Gil Bryan , 1966-19??
June Humes , 19??--19??
Mac Moore , 1973--19??
Ed Painter , 1965--19??
Joe Simms , 1961--19??
Pat Watson , 1966-1987?

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---
[This msg Virus Scanned by GlobalWeb.net]


---
[This msg Virus Scanned by GlobalWeb.net]


Re: Greetings from Floyd

Seth Williamson <seth@...>
 

Yes indeed, that's me--and my sister Kathy now lives near Richmond. We
did indeed live on East Main Street.

Yeah, I'm the only conservative that I know of in public radio (not
counting a single mole at NPR who has, alas, no influence). It's kinda
like being Robinson Crusoe, only you never find any other footprints on
the island.

Seth

PS: When I was at WJMA, I used my first name, Joe.

On Tue, 2003-01-21 at 18:38, Lax, Andrew wrote:
Seth:
A conservative? In public radio? Seth, are you the older brother of Cathy Williamson, of the East Main St Williamsons? We were friends in high school and I always wondered what happened to her. If not, never mind. Thanks, Andy Lax

-----Original Message-----
From: Seth Williamson [mailto:seth@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 6:34 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Greetings from Floyd


I may possibly be the senior person on this list, at least in terms of
when I worked for WJMA. I was there in high school and for a year or so
afterward. Late 1966 or early 1967 through 1969 or 1970. I was there
with John Cregg, Bill Little and Joe McCaffrey and engineer Gil
(Hodges? Bryant? I forget). My OCHS classmate Lewis Harvey was also
there briefly during this period but not for long as I remember (unless
he came back after I left).

For many years I have been a producer and announcer in public radio.
The tradition in this business is that the "golden age" anywhere ended
about three years before you got there, and that seems to be my
impression of WJMA, though this is undoubtedly a function of one's
memory of adolescence and young manhood--et in Arcadia ego. In only a
few other small towns have I known stations that seemed to be as much a
part of the local fabric of life as was WJMA in this period. I remember
my dad listening to Bill Little's "march around the breakfast table"
every day and sometimes getting irked at one or another aspect of Bill's
upbeat morning personality--but he kept listening to hear what might be
next. Bill was continuously, relentlessly "up" in the mornings, pretty
much the paradigm of the morning man. There were some mornings when my
dad felt it his right to be gloomy and occasionally Bill would clash
with these moods.

I also remember John Cregg setting my news copy on fire during the long
half-hour 6 pm newscast, an unsettling introduction to the art of
improvisation.

I look back at a few of these characters and marvel that they could have
existed in commercial radio. I used to have long talks with Gil at
night. He impressed me with his wide culture and reading. The fact
that he could appreciate both modern jazz and, say, the slick production
values on a Tammy Wynette commercial country single taught me to
appreciate the value of catholic tastes.

Joe McCaffrey was a memorable character. A few years older than me, he
later went on to be the Libertarian candidate for governor in some
midwestern state. He was (as I now can see with broader experience but
did not know then) a classic libertarian type, deeply but narrowly
educated and a bit obsessed, much more interested in politics than I was
at the time. Like most Libertarians, he was a Platonist and not an
Aristotelian, and highly opinionated. I remember Arch's struggles to
get him to do the Saturday country music shift and stick with the
format. Joe hated commercial country music and made complicated and
sophisticated arguments to Arch that what he, Joe, preferred to
play--folk music of the Kingson Trio ilk--was actually by definition
"country" music. I was amused at his persistence and the fertility of
his arguments in a lost cause like this.

And then there was Arch, of course, father figure and conduit of the
craft of communicating on the radio. I later went on in college to work
the board, briefly, for someone I think Arch had worked with, the
legendary Alden Aaroe in Richmond and from whom he perhaps learned some
of his own attention to detail. I have never known another manager with
Arch's education and concern for craft. He was indeed a stickler for
pronunciation. I remember the station was playing a Don Bowman comedy
record called "Dear Chet Atkins, Will You Teach Me to Pick?" or
something like that. In Bowman's exaggerated hillbilly accent it was
"Chit AY-kins." I listened to that record so much that one Saturday
morning I played a Chet Atkins guitar instrumental and unthinkingly
pronounced it Bowman's way, which earned a quick phone call of
scandalized reprimand.

As apolitical as I was at that time, I was chagrined at Arch's refusal
to let us play Dion's "Abraham, Martin and John." Arch was a staunch
conservative and bridled at the suggestion that King and Luther belonged
in the same league as Lincoln. All I remember at the time was
irritation at this restriction.

Of course, with the passing of years and the reading of lo these many
thousands of books, I have probably out-Arched Arch when it comes to
conservatism. Hell, not only do I not like King and Kennedy, I probably
have even less respect for Lincoln the (as it now seems to me)
constitutional usurper and tyrant. And the logic of the leftward drift
of old-line denominations made it inevitable that I would become Eastern
Orthodox (via Arch's Anglicanism), a big change from my childhood
experience with the Baptists. (At least, I seem to recall that Arch was
Episcopalian--I don't remember for sure.)

Another yearly reminder of Arch's influence was his approach to
Christmas programming, where he also swam against the current. He
didn't want to hear any heavy-duty religious Christmas music till well
into the season (as it was figured by commercial America, which meant in
fact Advent). This is what I do nowadays at WVTF, which I believe can
be heard in Orange. I dig in my heels and keep the Christmas stuff
light and secular for as long as I can, in a probably futile effort to
prevent everyone from getting sick to death of Christmas before it even
arrives. I think of Arch every Christmas season as I fight a rearguard
action against announcers who want to open the Christmas floodgates the
day after Thanksgiving.

Page Talley--I think she was an English teacher of mine at OCHS. Though
maybe I'm remembering wrong.

It was a good place to work, a good place to get a start in
broadcasting. When I think of craft, which I must do on a daily basis
these days as I train new announcers, I think of Arch.


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Re: Greetings from Floyd

Dave W <nospam2@...>
 

On Tue, 2003-01-21 at 18:38, Lax, Andrew wrote:
Seth:
A conservative? In public radio? Seth, are you the older brother of Cathy Williamson, of the East Main St Williamsons? We were friends in high school and I always wondered what happened to her. If not, never mind. Thanks, Andy Lax
He's the older brother of Kathy, and I'm the baby brother :-)

361 East Main Street, I remember it well!

--
Dave W <nospam2@...>


Sunday mornings

Seth Williamson <seth@...>
 

I also remember running Sunday mornings and a taped program from a local
black preacher. I can't recall the man's name. He was a byword with
the staff, in that he persisted in adding endings like "-eth" where they
didn't belong. "Yes, brothers and sister, you-eth have fallen away from
the light..."

One morning I thought I had gotten myself fired when I went ahead with a
practical joke, which consisted of replacing one of his musical numbers
with a track by the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band, "Everybody Get Down
on the Floor (and Do Your Thing)."

Amazingly, it got not a single phone call. So far as I'm aware, nobody
ever said anything about it, including the preacher himself. From this
distance I am amazed equally by the disrespect shown by my pimply-faced
self of those days, and the fact that the joke seemed to drop into the
pond without a single ripple. Amazing.


Re: Greetings from Floyd

Lax, Andrew <ALax@...>
 

Seth:
A conservative? In public radio? Seth, are you the older brother of Cathy Williamson, of the East Main St Williamsons? We were friends in high school and I always wondered what happened to her. If not, never mind. Thanks, Andy Lax

-----Original Message-----
From: Seth Williamson [mailto:seth@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 6:34 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Greetings from Floyd


I may possibly be the senior person on this list, at least in terms of
when I worked for WJMA. I was there in high school and for a year or so
afterward. Late 1966 or early 1967 through 1969 or 1970. I was there
with John Cregg, Bill Little and Joe McCaffrey and engineer Gil
(Hodges? Bryant? I forget). My OCHS classmate Lewis Harvey was also
there briefly during this period but not for long as I remember (unless
he came back after I left).

For many years I have been a producer and announcer in public radio.
The tradition in this business is that the "golden age" anywhere ended
about three years before you got there, and that seems to be my
impression of WJMA, though this is undoubtedly a function of one's
memory of adolescence and young manhood--et in Arcadia ego. In only a
few other small towns have I known stations that seemed to be as much a
part of the local fabric of life as was WJMA in this period. I remember
my dad listening to Bill Little's "march around the breakfast table"
every day and sometimes getting irked at one or another aspect of Bill's
upbeat morning personality--but he kept listening to hear what might be
next. Bill was continuously, relentlessly "up" in the mornings, pretty
much the paradigm of the morning man. There were some mornings when my
dad felt it his right to be gloomy and occasionally Bill would clash
with these moods.

I also remember John Cregg setting my news copy on fire during the long
half-hour 6 pm newscast, an unsettling introduction to the art of
improvisation.

I look back at a few of these characters and marvel that they could have
existed in commercial radio. I used to have long talks with Gil at
night. He impressed me with his wide culture and reading. The fact
that he could appreciate both modern jazz and, say, the slick production
values on a Tammy Wynette commercial country single taught me to
appreciate the value of catholic tastes.

Joe McCaffrey was a memorable character. A few years older than me, he
later went on to be the Libertarian candidate for governor in some
midwestern state. He was (as I now can see with broader experience but
did not know then) a classic libertarian type, deeply but narrowly
educated and a bit obsessed, much more interested in politics than I was
at the time. Like most Libertarians, he was a Platonist and not an
Aristotelian, and highly opinionated. I remember Arch's struggles to
get him to do the Saturday country music shift and stick with the
format. Joe hated commercial country music and made complicated and
sophisticated arguments to Arch that what he, Joe, preferred to
play--folk music of the Kingson Trio ilk--was actually by definition
"country" music. I was amused at his persistence and the fertility of
his arguments in a lost cause like this.

And then there was Arch, of course, father figure and conduit of the
craft of communicating on the radio. I later went on in college to work
the board, briefly, for someone I think Arch had worked with, the
legendary Alden Aaroe in Richmond and from whom he perhaps learned some
of his own attention to detail. I have never known another manager with
Arch's education and concern for craft. He was indeed a stickler for
pronunciation. I remember the station was playing a Don Bowman comedy
record called "Dear Chet Atkins, Will You Teach Me to Pick?" or
something like that. In Bowman's exaggerated hillbilly accent it was
"Chit AY-kins." I listened to that record so much that one Saturday
morning I played a Chet Atkins guitar instrumental and unthinkingly
pronounced it Bowman's way, which earned a quick phone call of
scandalized reprimand.

As apolitical as I was at that time, I was chagrined at Arch's refusal
to let us play Dion's "Abraham, Martin and John." Arch was a staunch
conservative and bridled at the suggestion that King and Luther belonged
in the same league as Lincoln. All I remember at the time was
irritation at this restriction.

Of course, with the passing of years and the reading of lo these many
thousands of books, I have probably out-Arched Arch when it comes to
conservatism. Hell, not only do I not like King and Kennedy, I probably
have even less respect for Lincoln the (as it now seems to me)
constitutional usurper and tyrant. And the logic of the leftward drift
of old-line denominations made it inevitable that I would become Eastern
Orthodox (via Arch's Anglicanism), a big change from my childhood
experience with the Baptists. (At least, I seem to recall that Arch was
Episcopalian--I don't remember for sure.)

Another yearly reminder of Arch's influence was his approach to
Christmas programming, where he also swam against the current. He
didn't want to hear any heavy-duty religious Christmas music till well
into the season (as it was figured by commercial America, which meant in
fact Advent). This is what I do nowadays at WVTF, which I believe can
be heard in Orange. I dig in my heels and keep the Christmas stuff
light and secular for as long as I can, in a probably futile effort to
prevent everyone from getting sick to death of Christmas before it even
arrives. I think of Arch every Christmas season as I fight a rearguard
action against announcers who want to open the Christmas floodgates the
day after Thanksgiving.

Page Talley--I think she was an English teacher of mine at OCHS. Though
maybe I'm remembering wrong.

It was a good place to work, a good place to get a start in
broadcasting. When I think of craft, which I must do on a daily basis
these days as I train new announcers, I think of Arch.


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Greetings from Floyd

Seth Williamson <seth@...>
 

I may possibly be the senior person on this list, at least in terms of
when I worked for WJMA. I was there in high school and for a year or so
afterward. Late 1966 or early 1967 through 1969 or 1970. I was there
with John Cregg, Bill Little and Joe McCaffrey and engineer Gil
(Hodges? Bryant? I forget). My OCHS classmate Lewis Harvey was also
there briefly during this period but not for long as I remember (unless
he came back after I left).

For many years I have been a producer and announcer in public radio.
The tradition in this business is that the "golden age" anywhere ended
about three years before you got there, and that seems to be my
impression of WJMA, though this is undoubtedly a function of one's
memory of adolescence and young manhood--et in Arcadia ego. In only a
few other small towns have I known stations that seemed to be as much a
part of the local fabric of life as was WJMA in this period. I remember
my dad listening to Bill Little's "march around the breakfast table"
every day and sometimes getting irked at one or another aspect of Bill's
upbeat morning personality--but he kept listening to hear what might be
next. Bill was continuously, relentlessly "up" in the mornings, pretty
much the paradigm of the morning man. There were some mornings when my
dad felt it his right to be gloomy and occasionally Bill would clash
with these moods.

I also remember John Cregg setting my news copy on fire during the long
half-hour 6 pm newscast, an unsettling introduction to the art of
improvisation.

I look back at a few of these characters and marvel that they could have
existed in commercial radio. I used to have long talks with Gil at
night. He impressed me with his wide culture and reading. The fact
that he could appreciate both modern jazz and, say, the slick production
values on a Tammy Wynette commercial country single taught me to
appreciate the value of catholic tastes.

Joe McCaffrey was a memorable character. A few years older than me, he
later went on to be the Libertarian candidate for governor in some
midwestern state. He was (as I now can see with broader experience but
did not know then) a classic libertarian type, deeply but narrowly
educated and a bit obsessed, much more interested in politics than I was
at the time. Like most Libertarians, he was a Platonist and not an
Aristotelian, and highly opinionated. I remember Arch's struggles to
get him to do the Saturday country music shift and stick with the
format. Joe hated commercial country music and made complicated and
sophisticated arguments to Arch that what he, Joe, preferred to
play--folk music of the Kingson Trio ilk--was actually by definition
"country" music. I was amused at his persistence and the fertility of
his arguments in a lost cause like this.

And then there was Arch, of course, father figure and conduit of the
craft of communicating on the radio. I later went on in college to work
the board, briefly, for someone I think Arch had worked with, the
legendary Alden Aaroe in Richmond and from whom he perhaps learned some
of his own attention to detail. I have never known another manager with
Arch's education and concern for craft. He was indeed a stickler for
pronunciation. I remember the station was playing a Don Bowman comedy
record called "Dear Chet Atkins, Will You Teach Me to Pick?" or
something like that. In Bowman's exaggerated hillbilly accent it was
"Chit AY-kins." I listened to that record so much that one Saturday
morning I played a Chet Atkins guitar instrumental and unthinkingly
pronounced it Bowman's way, which earned a quick phone call of
scandalized reprimand.

As apolitical as I was at that time, I was chagrined at Arch's refusal
to let us play Dion's "Abraham, Martin and John." Arch was a staunch
conservative and bridled at the suggestion that King and Luther belonged
in the same league as Lincoln. All I remember at the time was
irritation at this restriction.

Of course, with the passing of years and the reading of lo these many
thousands of books, I have probably out-Arched Arch when it comes to
conservatism. Hell, not only do I not like King and Kennedy, I probably
have even less respect for Lincoln the (as it now seems to me)
constitutional usurper and tyrant. And the logic of the leftward drift
of old-line denominations made it inevitable that I would become Eastern
Orthodox (via Arch's Anglicanism), a big change from my childhood
experience with the Baptists. (At least, I seem to recall that Arch was
Episcopalian--I don't remember for sure.)

Another yearly reminder of Arch's influence was his approach to
Christmas programming, where he also swam against the current. He
didn't want to hear any heavy-duty religious Christmas music till well
into the season (as it was figured by commercial America, which meant in
fact Advent). This is what I do nowadays at WVTF, which I believe can
be heard in Orange. I dig in my heels and keep the Christmas stuff
light and secular for as long as I can, in a probably futile effort to
prevent everyone from getting sick to death of Christmas before it even
arrives. I think of Arch every Christmas season as I fight a rearguard
action against announcers who want to open the Christmas floodgates the
day after Thanksgiving.

Page Talley--I think she was an English teacher of mine at OCHS. Though
maybe I'm remembering wrong.

It was a good place to work, a good place to get a start in
broadcasting. When I think of craft, which I must do on a daily basis
these days as I train new announcers, I think of Arch.


Re: Laurie's letter

Bob Traister <dxcc@...>
 

Aw Friends, put ure hand own the ridio. Better Yet. Put ure hand in the beck
of the ridio, 'mongst the tubes and the wires and yewell feel the pow'r of
the low-erd surge thru ure body.

...Brother Bob

----- Original Message -----
From: "laurie mccullough" <lmccullough@...>
To: <WJMA@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 6:11 PM
Subject: Re: RE: [WJMA] Laurie's letter


Oh my gosh- you're right! It WAS Bernard Battle..... and that was the
exact script.


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Re: One more missing WJMAer Found!!

Bob Traister <dxcc@...>
 

Ross:

There is another name missing from your list of former WJMA employees. It's
Mark C. Walker, who now lives in Spotsylvania County. I met him via ham
radio while I was in Orange (O Ran Gee) and introduced him to Arch when we
needed a part-timer. At that time he lived in Orchid, VA, a town which no
longer exists, but it was in Louisa County. As I recall, Mark used to make
the two hour drive (each way) to work the Sunday morning shift. He began
working at WJMA in 1970, I believe.

His email address is marwalk@...

I hope this helps.


...bob


Re: Laurie's letter

laurie mccullough <lmccullough@...>
 

Oh my gosh- you're right! It WAS Bernard Battle..... and that was the
exact script.


Re: update on the missing

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

Ross: Leslie Willis is married (can't remember her husband's last name) and live in Charlotesville. I've forwarded an earlier "missing" email to her sister, Russell, to pass on to Leslie. Andy Lax
Thanks, Andy. I had forgotten Russell.

I do remember Leslie. She bought a car from me and in my ignorance I didn't keep the plates so she could drive it right away. Seems she got into a little fender bender. It didn't take long for Ben Hargett at Mason Insurance to learn of this. He set me straight on proper DMV procedure.

I hope Leslie will join us. She's bound to have lots of good sales department stories.

Ross
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/


Re: update on the missing

Lax, Andrew <ALax@...>
 

Ross: Leslie Willis is married (can't remember her husband's last name) and live in Charlotesville. I've forwarded an earlier "missing" email to her sister, Russell, to pass on to Leslie. Andy Lax

-----Original Message-----
From: Dominion Market Research staff [mailto:staff@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 5:22 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] update on the missing


Jerry Hooper and Joe Boucher (current WJMA PD) are now with us on
line. There were errors in both of their email addresses. My typing
no doubt.

Also joining us today: Mary Johnson (sales) and Randy Shavis
(parttime). I hope both will provide a short bio of their lives since
WJMA.

I think I have located the following: Duke DuFrane, Dudley
Littlehales, Mary Moore, Marisa Murphy and Jean Purcell. I've emailed
or called each. It seems Page Talley has moved to Maryland.

I may have a line on the elusive John Cregg. I hope Reid will be able
to make a local call and find out if it's the right John. It seems he
has a lot of 'splainin' to do.

I may also have a line on Rob Eure who was a news stringer. At the
time he was a reporter for the Daily Progress. Google provided lots
of links to what must be an interesting career as a reporter. I think
he is currently working for the Wall Street Journal in Oregon. I
await a reply from the Journal website.

I had no luck with Rich Carpenter, Ted Carroll, Mike Coffey, Patricia
Hammill, John LeGarde, Ann Pritchett, Ron Smallwood or Leslie Willis.

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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update on the missing

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

Jerry Hooper and Joe Boucher (current WJMA PD) are now with us on line. There were errors in both of their email addresses. My typing no doubt.

Also joining us today: Mary Johnson (sales) and Randy Shavis (parttime). I hope both will provide a short bio of their lives since WJMA.

I think I have located the following: Duke DuFrane, Dudley Littlehales, Mary Moore, Marisa Murphy and Jean Purcell. I've emailed or called each. It seems Page Talley has moved to Maryland.

I may have a line on the elusive John Cregg. I hope Reid will be able to make a local call and find out if it's the right John. It seems he has a lot of 'splainin' to do.

I may also have a line on Rob Eure who was a news stringer. At the time he was a reporter for the Daily Progress. Google provided lots of links to what must be an interesting career as a reporter. I think he is currently working for the Wall Street Journal in Oregon. I await a reply from the Journal website.

I had no luck with Rich Carpenter, Ted Carroll, Mike Coffey, Patricia Hammill, John LeGarde, Ann Pritchett, Ron Smallwood or Leslie Willis.

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/