Date   
Youtha Whitten

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Yesterday at Montpelier, I saw Youtha Whitten (now Youtha Hardman-Cromwell). She had come to be part of the ceremonies for the dedication of Montpelier’s South Yard reconstruction project. The South Yard is where some of Montpelier’s enslaved community lived. The restoration is being funded by part of a recent gift of 10 million dollars to Montpelier by David Rubinstein.

Youtha was a part-time weekend announcer in 1980. She’s now a Professor of Practice in Ministry and Mission at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. https://www.wesleyseminary.edu/en-us/faculty/facultydirectory/youthahardman-cromwell.aspx

And here’s a link to a photo we took on Saturday. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_219.html

Ross
71-86

Bill Little on WVIR news

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Senator Tim Kaine visited Orange today and Bill Little got a few seconds of time on a WVIR channel 29 story. http://www.nbc29.com/story/28755763/sen-kaine-meets-with-town-of-orange-leaders

Ross
71-86
…………………………………………………………………...
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm


Stan Freberg

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

A genius has died. Stan Freberg was 88. http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/stan-freberg-dead-acclaimed-satirist-787007


Here are a couple of Freberg classics on behalf of radio…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyenSyjSr7k (Sarah Vaughan vocal at the end)


Ross
71-86

Re: A bit of Arch history

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Yep, that sounds like Arch.

Ross
71-86
…………………………………………………………………...
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm





On Mar 26, 2015, at 8:58 AM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

I discovered this story on the computer the other day. Arch sent it to me in 2005. I apologize if I have shared this with any or all of you already. It's worth retelling, in any event:

A truck driver is heading west across the Arizona desert. He's been 
 driving all night and as the sun starts to rise, he feels the need to 
 stop and commune with nature. He pulls to the side of the road, 
 parks, and walks out into the sage brush.

 As he is standing there looking around at the beauty of the early 
 morn, he notices a lever sticking out of the ground. After a few 
 moments he walks over, walks all the way around, and then reaches out 
 to grasp the lever. As he does he hears a voice say, "Don't touch 
 that lever!"

 The driver jumps about two feet off the ground and as he comes down, 
 he looks around. No one is to be seen. Thinking it was just his 
 imagination he again reaches for the lever. Again the voice yells, "I 
 said don't touch that lever!"

 Being more prepared, the driver senses the location of the voice and 
 looks down under a sage brush.  There he sees a small snake.

 The driver, in much astonishment, said, "Was that you that spoke?"

 The snake said, "Yes. I have to keep people from touching that lever. 
 If the lever is moved it will be the end of the world."

 The driver, still rather astonished, said, "What is your name? And 
 will you talk on TV?" The snake said his name was Nathan, his friends 
 called him Nate, and that he wasn't interested in going on TV. Anyway 
 he had to stay and watch the lever to see that it wasn't moved.

 The driver said, "Look, I will get the networks to send out camera 
 crews.  That way you can inform the entire world about the danger of 
 the lever."

 Nate thought that over and allowed as how there was a great deal of 
 sense in that idea. The driver, true to his word, got the
 network camera crews out. They put on broadcasts in which Nate warned 
 the entire world of the dangers of moving the lever.

 A few weeks later another truck driver was passing through the area. 
 He was following an oil tanker and the tanker sprang a
 leak.  When the truck behind hit the oil slick it went out of 
 control, and the driver found himself headed straight for the lever.

 He remembered seeing Nate on TV warning about the lever. He knew that 
 if he hit it he would cause the world to end. He
 strove with all his might to maneuver the truck.  Finally, at the 
 last possible moment, he was able to swerve away from the lever but 
 he ran over Nate and killed him.

 The truck driver was elated at missing the lever but sad that he 
 killed Nate. He dug a grave for the dead snake and performed a solemn 
 burial. Then he erected a wooden tomb stone and pondered what epitaph 
 to write. Then it came to him: "Better Nate than lever."

ah-9/29/05



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A bit of Arch history

Les Myers
 

I discovered this story on the computer the other day. Arch sent it to me in 2005. I apologize if I have shared this with any or all of you already. It's worth retelling, in any event:

A truck driver is heading west across the Arizona desert. He's been
 driving all night and as the sun starts to rise, he feels the need to
 stop and commune with nature. He pulls to the side of the road,
 parks, and walks out into the sage brush.

 As he is standing there looking around at the beauty of the early
 morn, he notices a lever sticking out of the ground. After a few
 moments he walks over, walks all the way around, and then reaches out
 to grasp the lever. As he does he hears a voice say, "Don't touch
 that lever!"

 The driver jumps about two feet off the ground and as he comes down,
 he looks around. No one is to be seen. Thinking it was just his
 imagination he again reaches for the lever. Again the voice yells, "I
 said don't touch that lever!"

 Being more prepared, the driver senses the location of the voice and
 looks down under a sage brush.  There he sees a small snake.

 The driver, in much astonishment, said, "Was that you that spoke?"

 The snake said, "Yes. I have to keep people from touching that lever.
 If the lever is moved it will be the end of the world."

 The driver, still rather astonished, said, "What is your name? And
 will you talk on TV?" The snake said his name was Nathan, his friends
 called him Nate, and that he wasn't interested in going on TV. Anyway
 he had to stay and watch the lever to see that it wasn't moved.

 The driver said, "Look, I will get the networks to send out camera
 crews.  That way you can inform the entire world about the danger of
 the lever."

 Nate thought that over and allowed as how there was a great deal of
 sense in that idea. The driver, true to his word, got the
 network camera crews out. They put on broadcasts in which Nate warned
 the entire world of the dangers of moving the lever.

 A few weeks later another truck driver was passing through the area.
 He was following an oil tanker and the tanker sprang a
 leak.  When the truck behind hit the oil slick it went out of
 control, and the driver found himself headed straight for the lever.

 He remembered seeing Nate on TV warning about the lever. He knew that
 if he hit it he would cause the world to end. He
 strove with all his might to maneuver the truck.  Finally, at the
 last possible moment, he was able to swerve away from the lever but
 he ran over Nate and killed him.

 The truck driver was elated at missing the lever but sad that he
 killed Nate. He dug a grave for the dead snake and performed a solemn
 burial. Then he erected a wooden tomb stone and pondered what epitaph
 to write. Then it came to him: "Better Nate than lever."

ah-9/29/05



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must see documentary

Ross Hunter <ross@...>
 

Unlike most of you, I probably wasn't paying enough attention to the backstory of 1960s and 70s music. This morning on NPR I heard a review of what sounds like a fascinating documentary. 

First a link to the Kenneth Turan review of "Wrecking Crew" and then an Ella Taylor review of the same documentary. I've also pasted the Taylor review below, but if you don't follow the link, you'll miss a good picture with George Harrison.




Ross
71-86
.......................

In the mid-1960s, pop music moved its center of gravity from New York to Los Angeles. It was a seismic shift, but growing up in the cold drizzle of post-World War II London, what did I know from the West Coast Sound? I was just a rapt kid with my ear glued to Top-40 radio, dreaming of sun, surf and sex via the Beach Boys, the Mamas and Papas, Sam Cooke, The Supremes. In my fevered imagination, Spector's towering "wall of sound" had to have been recorded in a cathedral.

In fact, according to an infectiously exuberant new documentary, the tracks for "Da-Doo-Ron-Ron," "Be My Baby" and the rest, along with much other West Coast pop, were laid down in a modestly sized room by an elite group of session musicians known as The Wrecking Crew, with vocals often recorded on top by the bands. The studio musicians rarely got credit on or off the albums. In The Wrecking Crew, Denny Tedesco, whose father was a Wrecking Crew guitarist, rights that wrong.

Tedesco began shooting in the mid-1990s as a tribute to his father, who, despite suffering a stroke, appears in the film as a hilarious raconteur along with a bunch of fellows whose names won't ring a bell, unless you count an ordinary-looking chap named Glen Campbell who later became that Glen Campbell. Along with one lively woman bassist, Carol Kaye, who insists she always felt like one of the boys, they're a refreshingly practical, down-to-earth crowd afflicted with little of the raging egos or pumped heroin sagas you may have seen in the current flood of burned-out-rocker docs. Some speak with regret of the family life they missed out on in long working days or travels with bands: one racked up six marriages, while another admits ruefully that he's a better grandfather than he was a father.

Mostly, though, they seem delighted to reunite and to hear better-known luminaries like Dick Clark, Brian Wilson, and the late Frank Zappa testify — however belatedly — to their genius as musicians whose openness to experimentation and willingness to travel between high and pop culture helped them survive in a notoriously cutthroat business. The Wrecking Crew moved with ease between R & B, jazz, pop, and soundtracks for movies and television. They laid track for everyone from Frank Sinatra to Alvin and the Chipmunks to the Bonanza theme, all of which appear on the soundtrack and generated several decades' worth of licensing headaches for the production.

The Wrecking Crew was perfectly attuned to the fizzy inventiveness of the West Coast in its heyday. Then came the '70s: recording artists started to bring their own musicians, the phones stopped ringing, punk rock arrived. Today, the sound of music in Los Angeles is different. But not long after I moved to L.A. in 1989 to work as a film critic at LA Weekly, I was reminded of the magic of that time by a lovely scene in British director Terence Davies' semi-autobiographical1992 film The Long Day Closes. A small boy with a pinched face looks out of the window of his drab tenement home in the North of England. There is endless rain, of course, but on the soundtrack is Debbie Reynolds singing "Tammy." That was us, California dreamin'.

Re: House of Cards alert

Clint Estes
 

That is so cool!!!  Way to go Al.
 
                  Clint Estes
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA]
To: WJMA Sent: Mon, Mar 2, 2015 10:16 pm
Subject: [WJMA] House of Cards alert

 
Heads up "House of Cards" fans. WJMA alum Al Gaige makes a brief appearance in a season three episode. Details from Al are in the caption of the picture at this link. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_218.html

Ross
71-86

House of Cards alert

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Heads up "House of Cards" fans. WJMA alum Al Gaige makes a brief appearance in a season three episode. Details from Al are in the caption of the picture at this link. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_218.html

Ross
71-86

Seth Williamson case settlemen

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

A friend sent me this story rom yesterday’s Roanoke Times. It’s an interesting, but sad story.

Ross
71-86
========================================

Joseph Seth Williamson
Died after hernia surgery.
Seth Williamson device case settlement 

Dated: Friday, February 20, 2015 7:10 pm 
By Jeff Sturgeon jeff.sturgeon@... 981-3251  


The children of radio personality Joseph Seth Williamson will collect $500,000 from the maker of an infusion pump in use at the time of his death at LewisGale Hospital Montgomery, according to papers unsealed Friday in Roanoke federal court.

The settlement ends a product liability case that pitted Williamson’s daughters — Deirdre Jain, 35, of Fairfax and Emily Williamson, 34, of Roanoke — against the corporations responsible for the Hospira LifeCare PCA 3 Infusion System.

Williamson, a voice heard frequently on WVTF, died in 2011 at the hospital near Blacksburg. He had gone in Oct. 5 with abdominal pain, underwent emergency hernia repair surgery Oct. 6 and died early Oct. 7 while hooked to the pump.

Shortly after his death, the hospital focused attention on the pump’s performance and programming. Although it had been designed and marketed as an improved device to prevent medication errors, it had dispensed excessive amounts of painkiller to Williamson after a programming error by hospital nurses, court papers said.

First, the daughters took action against the hospital. The hospital paid the daughters in a confidential settlement of medical malpractice claims in 2012. The parties handled it quietly in an adjacent county with sealed records.

In 2013, the daughters filed a federal lawsuit against Hospira Inc. of Lake Forest, Illinois, which brought the PCA 3 to market, and Abbott Laboratories Inc. based north of Chicago, which once owned Hospira. That case settled Friday.

The companies said in court papers that they settled the case to avoid the expense and inconvenience of a trial. Both companies said they continue to deny liability for Williamson’s death.

But in addition to paying the women $500,000 and a total settlement of $900,000 to cover legal expenses, the companies pledged to investigate 50 reported incidents involving misprogramming of the pump, court papers said.

In suing Hospira and Abbott, the daughters said the pump had inadequate operating instructions and warnings and that that issue had led to hospital nurses misprogramming the device. Williamson received five times as much painkiller as his doctor prescribed, causing an overdose that killed him, the suit said.

But defense lawyers said the daughters failed to tie Williamson’s death to any issue with the adequacy of the pump’s instructions and warnings. They said the instructions and warnings were adequate.

The defense also argued that hospital nurses knew the well-understood perils of misprogramming an infusion pump and failed to adequately monitor Williamson after hooking him to the misprogrammed machine.

In fact, he should have been checked at least seven times for pain relief, sedation, breathing quality, nausea and itching between 9:22 when nurses connected the pump to increase his pain medicine and 1:10 a.m. when they found him unresponsive, according to Polly Zimmerman, a nursing expert brought in to assess the incident. But nurses checked him just three times during that period, Zimmerman said in court papers.

Two hours and 10 minutes passed between his second-to-last check and the check that found him nonresponsive, which Zimmerman called a departure from normal nursing care standards. Zimmerman also opined in favor of the pump, saying its instructions were clear and that “my nursing students at a public community college consistently are able to understand and independently apply these instructions with minimal assistance during their basic nursing education.”

U.S. District Court Judge Michael Urbanski said the pre-trial settlement made sense to him because Williamson’s daughters had no guarantee they would have won at trial against the pump companies. “It could have gone either way,” the judge said.

In their favor, the daughters had a discharge report by Williamson’s physician that said he received 12.5 milligrams of Dilaudid versus the 2.5 milligrams prescribed.

On the other hand, Williamson’s autopsy found that he died of heart disease. The 355-pound Williamson had a variety of health problems, court papers said.

Of note, his system contained a therapeutic dose of painkiller in his system when autopsied, according to the report from the Roanoke medical examiner’s office. The conflicting claims that Williamson received too much painkiller and that he died of heart disease were never resolved.

Williamson’s daughters, who appeared in court Friday, told the judge they agreed with the settlement. Plaintiff’s attorney Robert Hall is entitled to $360,000, or 40 percent of the money the companies will pay, plus about $40,000 toward case expenses. After those deductions, each daughter will receive about $250,000. The daughters previously advanced Hall about $40,000 toward case expenses.

Lawyers for pump companies and the daughters tried without success to keep the settlement confidential.

On Jan. 26, the lawyers presented their settlement of the federal lawsuit against Abbott and Hospira under seal to a state court judge, David Williams of Patrick County Circuit Court, who granted his approval. That move led to a dramatic conflict between the lawyers and Urbanski, who accused the lawyers of attempting to improperly seal the settlement from public view.

“You all knew the federal court was not going to allow you to put this settlement under seal,” Urbanski told the lawyers two days later. “Without letting me know and while my case is pending, you all went running off in Patrick County and got this settlement approved down there without me knowing about it while a case is pending here in federal court and you’ve done it under seal to hide these issues from the public. I’m appalled.

“The settlement you just got approved in Patrick County is void,” Urbanski said.

State law requires court review of any wrongful death settlement in the same court where the parties filed the underlying lawsuit, the judge said. During the review, the settlement must become public, Urbanski said as he ordered the lawyers to return the matter to his court.

Friday, with the lawyers back in his court, Urbanski refused to seal any part of the settlement document and released it publicly. A lawyer for The Roanoke Times appeared at the hearing to argue against keeping any part of the settlement confidential and to ask for full disclosure.

That ended the federal-level litigation over Williamson’s death against the pump maker.

But a seal still protects from public view the hospital’s 2012 settlement with Williamson’s daughters. It is under seal in Patrick County Circuit Court at the request of the lawyers for Hospira, Abbott and Williamson’s daughters, who were free under state law to choose to process the claim in any county’s state court.

It was sealed by Williams, the same Patrick County judge who approved and sealed the $900,000 federal settlement — until Urbanski told the lawyers he would not let them do that.

Urbanski, as he noted Friday, has had no control over the 2012 hospital case, which was never before him. He said Friday he hasn’t seen the terms of that settlement either.

BOS resolution for Jean Love

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

On Tuesday (2/10) I went to the Orange County Board of Supervisors meeting to accept a Resolution of Appreciation on behalf of Jean Love’s family. Next week I’ll send the resolution and a pile of Jean’s air checks on CD to her niece in Florida.

Two pictures are linked below. The second one is the resolution.

Ross
71-86
……………….
http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_216.html

Re: FYI

Les Myers
 

You never know what seeds you plant or where the wind blows them.


 
Laughter is carbonated holiness. -Anne Lamott


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 17:36:17 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] FYI

 

It’s been over a year since any of the WJMA videos have sold, but two weeks ago there was an order for one to be shipped to New Jersey. I include a note asking if the recipient would let me know about their interest in WJMA or the video. Today I got the following email:


In addition to working as a director, writer and designer for almost 40 years I am also an instructor.  I've been given the challenge of developing a radio and TV History course at a private school.  I'm collecting as much info as possible and believe that local TV stations are an important aspect of that history.  I have yet to view the DVD but was intrigued by the possibilities of what it might offer.

All I know is the initials and last name of the recipient and that the DVD was shipped to New Jersey. I Googled that information and found this:

As a producer, director and designer, J.C.'s independent films, short form videos, graphic designs and scripts have been honored with over eighty national and regional awards, including twelve prestigious Telly Awards. J.C. has had the good fortune to maintain two artistic paths, academic and professional, in the performing arts. He has taught at three major New Jersey universities and professionally has worked off and off-off Broadway, in feature films, regional and academic theatre and on live and video corporate projects.

J.C.’s most recent productions were The Concrete Wall at the Samuel French Off-Off Broadway Festival, Small Bites: A Smorgasbord of One-Act Comedies, in New Jersey and at The Planet Connections Festivity (Winner of the Best Evening of One-Acts Award), and The Curtain Players production of The Ancient Mariner in Ohio. J.C. will soon return to the New York stage with his new comedy A Cordial Invitation. Previous New York productions include A Play on Words, The Bedsitter, Portraits, Meetings in a Wooded Area, HAPPY HOLIDAY$ and Information, PLEASE! 

I’m not certain it’s the same person. I replied to the email with a link to the web site and an offer to provide more information if needed.

Ross
71-86


Free Online Photosharing - Share your photos online with your friends and family!
Visit http://www.inbox.com/photosharing to find out more!

FYI

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

It’s been over a year since any of the WJMA videos have sold, but two weeks ago there was an order for one to be shipped to New Jersey. I include a note asking if the recipient would let me know about their interest in WJMA or the video. Today I got the following email:

In addition to working as a director, writer and designer for almost 40 years I am also an instructor.  I've been given the challenge of developing a radio and TV History course at a private school.  I'm collecting as much info as possible and believe that local TV stations are an important aspect of that history.  I have yet to view the DVD but was intrigued by the possibilities of what it might offer.

All I know is the initials and last name of the recipient and that the DVD was shipped to New Jersey. I Googled that information and found this:

As a producer, director and designer, J.C.'s independent films, short form videos, graphic designs and scripts have been honored with over eighty national and regional awards, including twelve prestigious Telly Awards. J.C. has had the good fortune to maintain two artistic paths, academic and professional, in the performing arts. He has taught at three major New Jersey universities and professionally has worked off and off-off Broadway, in feature films, regional and academic theatre and on live and video corporate projects.

J.C.’s most recent productions were The Concrete Wall at the Samuel French Off-Off Broadway Festival, Small Bites: A Smorgasbord of One-Act Comedies, in New Jersey and at The Planet Connections Festivity (Winner of the Best Evening of One-Acts Award), and The Curtain Players production of The Ancient Mariner in Ohio. J.C. will soon return to the New York stage with his new comedy A Cordial Invitation. Previous New York productions include A Play on Words, The Bedsitter, Portraits, Meetings in a Wooded Area, HAPPY HOLIDAY$ and Information, PLEASE! 

I’m not certain it’s the same person. I replied to the email with a link to the web site and an offer to provide more information if needed.

Ross
71-86

today's email

Ross Hunter <ross@...>
 

Here's an email that landed in the in-box today:

Ross
71-86
=====================================
Webmaster and all...
 
Just a note to let you know what a neat site you have put together.
 
Darn good stuff!  Makes me feel bad that none of my 50 years on mic around the country were spent on WJMA.
 
Mike Millard
Ft. Lauderdale

Re: Thoughts on mistakes

Mark Johnson
 

"It's OK if you make a mistake -- you haven't done anything that bad. Nobody died!""

A most important point Mary. Somewhere in my shake down period someone said essentially the same thing to me. The culture fostered by Arch and Ross forgave making mistakes. What was not cool at all was to make a mistake and not care.

Mark Johnson
81-84

--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 1/10/15, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

Date: January 10, 2015 at 2:12:07 PM
EST
From: "maretw2@..."
<maretw2@...>
Subject: Thoughts on Jean Love -- and Pat
Watson
To:
WJMA-owner@..., wjma@..., jrhunter3@...

Hi, fellow JMAers,


Jean taught me a lot about
working in the control room. 

At one point I was more
than a bit frustrated about keeping track of everything:
station ID's, news, sports, weather, the meters, getting
the music going {and at the right speed}, watching song
rotation, etc.... 

She finally looked at me
and said something like:

     "It's OK
if you make a mistake -- you haven't done anything that
bad.  Nobody died!"

After that and a few more
training sessions with her and Ross and Russ, I was able to
get everything done and run the station by myself.

Jean also showed me how to
back-up the LP's and 45's so the music would start
when I wanted it to.

[And that reminds me of
one morning when I played Simon Garfunkle's (sp?)
version of What a Wonderful World.  Pat Watson walked in
the control room and said I had it at the wrong
speed.............  

It was the correct speed;
just a slower version of the song than she was used to!
 Pat paid close attention to what we announcers -- and
everyone else for that matter -- were doing and would not
let mistakes go by unremarked.]

Ah, memories.....

Looks like I probably will
not be able to attend Jean's service.

Take care,


Mary T
('75-'79)

Thoughts on Jean Love -- and Pat Watson

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 



Begin forwarded message:

Date: January 10, 2015 at 2:12:07 PM EST
From: "maretw2@..." <maretw2@...>
Subject: Thoughts on Jean Love -- and Pat Watson
To: WJMA-owner@..., wjma@..., jrhunter3@...

Hi, fellow JMAers,


Jean taught me a lot about working in the control room. 

At one point I was more than a bit frustrated about keeping track of everything: station ID's, news, sports, weather, the meters, getting the music going {and at the right speed}, watching song rotation, etc.... 

She finally looked at me and said something like:

     "It's OK if you make a mistake -- you haven't done anything that bad.  Nobody died!"

After that and a few more training sessions with her and Ross and Russ, I was able to get everything done and run the station by myself.

Jean also showed me how to back-up the LP's and 45's so the music would start when I wanted it to.

[And that reminds me of one morning when I played Simon Garfunkle's (sp?) version of What a Wonderful World.  Pat Watson walked in the control room and said I had it at the wrong speed.............  

It was the correct speed; just a slower version of the song than she was used to!  Pat paid close attention to what we announcers -- and everyone else for that matter -- were doing and would not let mistakes go by unremarked.]

Ah, memories.....

Looks like I probably will not be able to attend Jean's service.

Take care,


Mary T ('75-'79)
____________________________________________________________
Apple&#39;s Crazy New Gizmo
Forget the iPhone 6. Next hit Apple product leaked. &#40;see picture&#41;

Re: Joe Rowe.

Alex Formwalt
 

Will plan on it. Hope to see a few other familiar faces there plus I can see Grymes where I attended 6-8th grades a hundred years ago.

 

From: WJMA@... [mailto:WJMA@...]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2015 7:11 AM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Joe Rowe.

 

 

Frank Walker would like for you to say hello.

 

Ross

 

On Jan 8, 2015, at 11:19 PM, formwalt formwalt@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

 

 

Thx Ross. I'll be there.

 

 

Sent via smartphone

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "Ross Hunter ross@... [WJMA]" <WJMA@...> 

Date:01/08/2015 11:47 (GMT-05:00) 

Cc: 

Subject: [WJMA] Fwd: Joe Rowe. 

 

 

 

Alex,

 

Here's an email being distributed by Frank Walker.

 

Ross

=========================================


 
I can’t tell how widely Doug Graves’ message was distributed, so I am forwarding it just to be sure you have seen it:
 
 
    Friends----below is the e-mail sent by the Headmaster (Bryon C. Hulsey) of Woodberry Forest School. If you recall, Joe retired from Woodberry and was then Headmaster of Grymes Memorial School. His e-mail summarizes the life and career of our dear friend and also includes the plans for his memorial service on Saturday January 10, 2015. I thought I would share it with you-----
 
Subject: The Death of Joe Rowe
Here is Woodberry Headmaster Byron Hulsey's message upon the death of Joe Rowe:
 
I am sorry to report that Joe Rowe, a beloved and highly respected member of the Woodberry Forest faculty for twenty-four years, died January 4, 2015, at his home in Orange. He was ninety-two years old, and a true gentleman in the truest sense of the term.
 
Joe first came to Woodberry in 1952 to teach mathematics. He chaired the math department and was the first master to hold the William Leland Lord Chair of Mathematics. Over the years, he served as a dorm master and as faculty adviser to the English Speaking Union scholarship exchange program, Civil War club, and art club. During the mid to late 1950s, he managed the Woodberry Forest Inn at the end of the era when the school welcomed vacationing families during the summer. Joe served as headmaster of Grymes Memorial School between 1973 and 1981. He returned to Woodberry in 1981, retiring three years later to care for his elderly mother in Maryland. After her death, he moved to Orange.
 
Born in Washington, DC, Joe grew up in Indian Head, Maryland. He graduated from Charlotte Hall School in 1939. He earned his AB degree from Western Maryland College before serving in the US Army in Europe during World War II. After the war, he continued his education at the University of Virginia, where he earned the MEd in 1959. Joe continued his studies at the University of Munich, Texas Tech, and the University of Maryland. A lifelong bachelor, he remained active in the Orange community.  He loved symphonic music and was an avid horticulturist. He also wrote extensively, primarily biographies and local history. He is the author of Old Masters and Old Masters 2, two excellent books about Woodberry teachers and their many contributions to the culture of this community. Joe loved his church and he was absolutely devoted to the town of Orange. Fittingly, the Orange County Education Foundation honored him with its lifetime contribution award in 2013.
 
The funeral service for Joe Rowe will take place at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Orange on Saturday, January 10, at 1:00 p.m., and will be followed by a reception in Gardner Hall (the new building) at Grymes Memorial School. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Graves Chapel in Graves Mill, VA. Make checks payable to:
 
Piedmont Episcopal Church
P.O. Box 305
Madison, VA 22727
 
Best wishes,
Byron
 
Byron C. Hulsey, Headmaster
Woodberry Forest School
48 Woodberry Station
Woodberry Forest, VA 22989

540.672.6000

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 

 

 

 

 

Re: Joe Rowe.

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Frank Walker would like for you to say hello.

Ross

On Jan 8, 2015, at 11:19 PM, formwalt formwalt@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:


Thx Ross. I'll be there.


Sent via smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Ross Hunter ross@... [WJMA]" <WJMA@...> 
Date:01/08/2015 11:47 (GMT-05:00) 
Cc: 
Subject: [WJMA] Fwd: Joe Rowe. 

 

Alex,

Here's an email being distributed by Frank Walker.

Ross
=========================================

 
I can’t tell how widely Doug Graves’ message was distributed, so I am forwarding it just to be sure you have seen it:
 
 
    Friends----below is the e-mail sent by the Headmaster (Bryon C. Hulsey) of Woodberry Forest School. If you recall, Joe retired from Woodberry and was then Headmaster of Grymes Memorial School. His e-mail summarizes the life and career of our dear friend and also includes the plans for his memorial service on Saturday January 10, 2015. I thought I would share it with you-----
 
Subject: The Death of Joe Rowe
Here is Woodberry Headmaster Byron Hulsey's message upon the death of Joe Rowe:
 
I am sorry to report that Joe Rowe, a beloved and highly respected member of the Woodberry Forest faculty for twenty-four years, died January 4, 2015, at his home in Orange. He was ninety-two years old, and a true gentleman in the truest sense of the term.
 
Joe first came to Woodberry in 1952 to teach mathematics. He chaired the math department and was the first master to hold the William Leland Lord Chair of Mathematics. Over the years, he served as a dorm master and as faculty adviser to the English Speaking Union scholarship exchange program, Civil War club, and art club. During the mid to late 1950s, he managed the Woodberry Forest Inn at the end of the era when the school welcomed vacationing families during the summer. Joe served as headmaster of Grymes Memorial School between 1973 and 1981. He returned to Woodberry in 1981, retiring three years later to care for his elderly mother in Maryland. After her death, he moved to Orange.
 
Born in Washington, DC, Joe grew up in Indian Head, Maryland. He graduated from Charlotte Hall School in 1939. He earned his AB degree from Western Maryland College before serving in the US Army in Europe during World War II. After the war, he continued his education at the University of Virginia, where he earned the MEd in 1959. Joe continued his studies at the University of Munich, Texas Tech, and the University of Maryland. A lifelong bachelor, he remained active in the Orange community.  He loved symphonic music and was an avid horticulturist. He also wrote extensively, primarily biographies and local history. He is the author of Old Masters and Old Masters 2, two excellent books about Woodberry teachers and their many contributions to the culture of this community. Joe loved his church and he was absolutely devoted to the town of Orange. Fittingly, the Orange County Education Foundation honored him with its lifetime contribution award in 2013.
 
The funeral service for Joe Rowe will take place at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Orange on Saturday, January 10, at 1:00 p.m., and will be followed by a reception in Gardner Hall (the new building) at Grymes Memorial School. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Graves Chapel in Graves Mill, VA. Make checks payable to:
 
Piedmont Episcopal Church
P.O. Box 305
Madison, VA 22727
 
Best wishes,
Byron
 
Byron C. Hulsey, Headmaster
Woodberry Forest School
48 Woodberry Station
Woodberry Forest, VA 22989

540.672.6000

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------








Re: Joe Rowe.

Alex Formwalt
 

Thx Ross. I'll be there.


Sent via smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Ross Hunter ross@... [WJMA]" <WJMA@...>
Date:01/08/2015 11:47 (GMT-05:00)
To: WJMA@...
Cc:
Subject: [WJMA] Fwd: Joe Rowe.

 

Alex,

Here's an email being distributed by Frank Walker.

Ross
=========================================

 
I can’t tell how widely Doug Graves’ message was distributed, so I am forwarding it just to be sure you have seen it:
 
 
    Friends----below is the e-mail sent by the Headmaster (Bryon C. Hulsey) of Woodberry Forest School. If you recall, Joe retired from Woodberry and was then Headmaster of Grymes Memorial School. His e-mail summarizes the life and career of our dear friend and also includes the plans for his memorial service on Saturday January 10, 2015. I thought I would share it with you-----
 
Subject: The Death of Joe Rowe
Here is Woodberry Headmaster Byron Hulsey's message upon the death of Joe Rowe:
 
I am sorry to report that Joe Rowe, a beloved and highly respected member of the Woodberry Forest faculty for twenty-four years, died January 4, 2015, at his home in Orange. He was ninety-two years old, and a true gentleman in the truest sense of the term.
 
Joe first came to Woodberry in 1952 to teach mathematics. He chaired the math department and was the first master to hold the William Leland Lord Chair of Mathematics. Over the years, he served as a dorm master and as faculty adviser to the English Speaking Union scholarship exchange program, Civil War club, and art club. During the mid to late 1950s, he managed the Woodberry Forest Inn at the end of the era when the school welcomed vacationing families during the summer. Joe served as headmaster of Grymes Memorial School between 1973 and 1981. He returned to Woodberry in 1981, retiring three years later to care for his elderly mother in Maryland. After her death, he moved to Orange.
 
Born in Washington, DC, Joe grew up in Indian Head, Maryland. He graduated from Charlotte Hall School in 1939. He earned his AB degree from Western Maryland College before serving in the US Army in Europe during World War II. After the war, he continued his education at the University of Virginia, where he earned the MEd in 1959. Joe continued his studies at the University of Munich, Texas Tech, and the University of Maryland. A lifelong bachelor, he remained active in the Orange community.  He loved symphonic music and was an avid horticulturist. He also wrote extensively, primarily biographies and local history. He is the author of Old Masters and Old Masters 2, two excellent books about Woodberry teachers and their many contributions to the culture of this community. Joe loved his church and he was absolutely devoted to the town of Orange. Fittingly, the Orange County Education Foundation honored him with its lifetime contribution award in 2013.
 
The funeral service for Joe Rowe will take place at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Orange on Saturday, January 10, at 1:00 p.m., and will be followed by a reception in Gardner Hall (the new building) at Grymes Memorial School. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Graves Chapel in Graves Mill, VA. Make checks payable to:
 
Piedmont Episcopal Church
P.O. Box 305
Madison, VA 22727
 
Best wishes,
Byron
 
Byron C. Hulsey, Headmaster
Woodberry Forest School
48 Woodberry Station
Woodberry Forest, VA 22989

540.672.6000

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Joe Rowe.

Ross Hunter <ross@...>
 

Alex,

Here's an email being distributed by Frank Walker.

Ross
=========================================

 
I can’t tell how widely Doug Graves’ message was distributed, so I am forwarding it just to be sure you have seen it:
 
 
    Friends----below is the e-mail sent by the Headmaster (Bryon C. Hulsey) of Woodberry Forest School. If you recall, Joe retired from Woodberry and was then Headmaster of Grymes Memorial School. His e-mail summarizes the life and career of our dear friend and also includes the plans for his memorial service on Saturday January 10, 2015. I thought I would share it with you-----
 
Subject: The Death of Joe Rowe
Here is Woodberry Headmaster Byron Hulsey's message upon the death of Joe Rowe:
 
I am sorry to report that Joe Rowe, a beloved and highly respected member of the Woodberry Forest faculty for twenty-four years, died January 4, 2015, at his home in Orange. He was ninety-two years old, and a true gentleman in the truest sense of the term.
 
Joe first came to Woodberry in 1952 to teach mathematics. He chaired the math department and was the first master to hold the William Leland Lord Chair of Mathematics. Over the years, he served as a dorm master and as faculty adviser to the English Speaking Union scholarship exchange program, Civil War club, and art club. During the mid to late 1950s, he managed the Woodberry Forest Inn at the end of the era when the school welcomed vacationing families during the summer. Joe served as headmaster of Grymes Memorial School between 1973 and 1981. He returned to Woodberry in 1981, retiring three years later to care for his elderly mother in Maryland. After her death, he moved to Orange.
 
Born in Washington, DC, Joe grew up in Indian Head, Maryland. He graduated from Charlotte Hall School in 1939. He earned his AB degree from Western Maryland College before serving in the US Army in Europe during World War II. After the war, he continued his education at the University of Virginia, where he earned the MEd in 1959. Joe continued his studies at the University of Munich, Texas Tech, and the University of Maryland. A lifelong bachelor, he remained active in the Orange community.  He loved symphonic music and was an avid horticulturist. He also wrote extensively, primarily biographies and local history. He is the author of Old Masters and Old Masters 2, two excellent books about Woodberry teachers and their many contributions to the culture of this community. Joe loved his church and he was absolutely devoted to the town of Orange. Fittingly, the Orange County Education Foundation honored him with its lifetime contribution award in 2013.
 
The funeral service for Joe Rowe will take place at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Orange on Saturday, January 10, at 1:00 p.m., and will be followed by a reception in Gardner Hall (the new building) at Grymes Memorial School. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Graves Chapel in Graves Mill, VA. Make checks payable to:
 
Piedmont Episcopal Church
P.O. Box 305
Madison, VA 22727
 
Best wishes,
Byron
 
Byron C. Hulsey, Headmaster
Woodberry Forest School
48 Woodberry Station
Woodberry Forest, VA 22989

540.672.6000

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





The importance of radio

Les Myers
 

 A film crew was filming in the highlands when an old Gaelic seer came hobbling by.
"Tomorrow rain," he informed them and hobbled on. Sure enough it rained the very next day.
Again he hobbled past: "Tomorrow sunshine," he let them know, and it was indeed a fine
sunny day the next day.

 The director was mighty impressed and got the crew to hire him and every day the wise old
sage predicted accurately what the weather would be. But after a couple of weeks the old
man didn't show up and eventually the director found him in a cottage.

 "Hey, we need your predictions, why aren't you showing up?" 

"Radio broken," the old man replied.

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