Date   
Re: The good old days

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Those stories sound familiar. I sure the news people remember them, too.

I recall that at times we used the first couple of techniques on remotes to allow the person at the remote location to roam around.

Ross
71-86
..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Mar 15, 2016, at 10:28 AM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

This exchange appeared on the International Association of Audio Information Services news group:

1a 

The "Good Old Days of Telephone Remote Feeds 

Mon Mar 14, 2016 6:17 am (PDT) . Posted by: 

"Mike Duke" 

I'm sure that Art, and perhaps Bill Pasco will remember this trick from commercial radio.

First, we would record a news piece, remote audio break, or whatever, on whatever recording medium was available to us at the moment.

Then, we would find an un-suspecting telephone, most likely a pay phone.

After establishing contact with another live being back at the station, we would un-screw the mouth piece cover from the telephone receiver, and set the carbon microphone element of the telephone aside.

Then, out came the handy patch cable which had a plug on one end to fit the headphone output of the recorder, and two alligator clips on the other end to clip onto the contacts inside the telephone receiver that normally rested against the telephone microphone element.

Then, after listening for the cue in the earpiece of the telephone, we would press the play button at the appropriate time, adjust the volume level on the fly if necessary, (because we forgot to test the level first) and keep our fingers crossed that the clips didn't fall off or short out before the feed was finished.

Finally, we removed all of the evidence, and re-assembled the telephone, hopefully remembering to replace the microphone during the process.

If our station really liked us, there was a tool made specifically for removing the plastic mouthpiece cover. Otherwise, we used a rubber jar lid remover or a paper towel along with whatever wrench you had to fit the standard mouth piece, and often said a few naughty things about cheap station owners while trying to remove the mouthpiece cover without the proper tools.

And, if we were really lucky, we got paid for doing that!

Posted by: 

"Hadley, Art" arthadley 

Yeah, except in the 70s, they started gluing the handsets together on public phones so you couldn't unscrew them.

Remember the thing they sold for that situation? It was a speaker, plugged into your earphone jack, and then snapped onto the phone mouthpiece with a rubber cap.

Yes, children. We used to suffer great hardships when trying to move audio, and spend tons of money doing it.

Nowadays, I can record a half hour audio file at home, and without spending a nickel, ship it to Germany, get paid via PayPal, and have the money in my bank account, all within about fifteen minutes. You'll appreciate that technology more if you ever spent $200 for a phone line to go two miles for a one hour broadcast. (Or if, like Mike, you've used car jumper cables, band-aids, duct tape and clothespins to get audio into the phone lines in the past.)

1c 

Re: The "Good Old Days of Telephone Remote Feeds

Mon Mar 14, 2016 6:54 am (PDT) . Posted by: 

"Mike Duke" 

I had forgotten about that little speaker for the permanent mouthpiece.

I saw one at one station I visited, but never had to use it where I worked.

After modular phone cords came along, one station where I worked got really fancy. They had a hard shell briefcase with a telephone, isolating audio coupler, and a small mixer mounted inside.

You plugged in the phone, dialed the number of the station, or had the station call you, muted the mouthpiece with a switch, and worked everything through the mixer and headphones.

When you were done, you rolled up the cables, put the microphone and headphones back into the briefcase, re-connected the regular telephone, and that was all there was to it.

I occasionally run into old packages like that at ham radio flea markets.

MD

Posted by: 

"Bill Pasco" 

Well now Mike, I've certainly heard about that method of remote feeds, 
being well read and all, but I'm way to young to have actually done 
that. You are much older than I after all. LOL

Posted by: 

"Mike Duke" 

I failed to mention, they actually taught us how to set up that way in my broadcast production lab class in college.


Re: The "Good Old Days of Telephone Remote Feeds

Mon Mar 14, 2016 2:01 pm (PDT) . Posted by: 

"Chuck Adkins" 

Yes, I've used the alligator clip method. I've also used a round plastic thing called a wonder loop. Yes, I've done beepball (a game using a ball that has audio so people who are blind can track its location) with a cellphone. There were also the Marty units I have used on about 166 megs in my commercial radio days. 


 


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The good old days

Les Myers
 

This exchange appeared on the International Association of Audio Information Services news group:

1a

The "Good Old Days of Telephone Remote Feeds

Mon Mar 14, 2016 6:17 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Mike Duke"

I'm sure that Art, and perhaps Bill Pasco will remember this trick from commercial radio.

First, we would record a news piece, remote audio break, or whatever, on whatever recording medium was available to us at the moment.

Then, we would find an un-suspecting telephone, most likely a pay phone.

After establishing contact with another live being back at the station, we would un-screw the mouth piece cover from the telephone receiver, and set the carbon microphone element of the telephone aside.

Then, out came the handy patch cable which had a plug on one end to fit the headphone output of the recorder, and two alligator clips on the other end to clip onto the contacts inside the telephone receiver that normally rested against the telephone microphone element.

Then, after listening for the cue in the earpiece of the telephone, we would press the play button at the appropriate time, adjust the volume level on the fly if necessary, (because we forgot to test the level first) and keep our fingers crossed that the clips didn't fall off or short out before the feed was finished.

Finally, we removed all of the evidence, and re-assembled the telephone, hopefully remembering to replace the microphone during the process.

If our station really liked us, there was a tool made specifically for removing the plastic mouthpiece cover. Otherwise, we used a rubber jar lid remover or a paper towel along with whatever wrench you had to fit the standard mouth piece, and often said a few naughty things about cheap station owners while trying to remove the mouthpiece cover without the proper tools.

And, if we were really lucky, we got paid for doing that!

Posted by:

"Hadley, Art" arthadley

Yeah, except in the 70s, they started gluing the handsets together on public phones so you couldn't unscrew them.

Remember the thing they sold for that situation? It was a speaker, plugged into your earphone jack, and then snapped onto the phone mouthpiece with a rubber cap.

Yes, children. We used to suffer great hardships when trying to move audio, and spend tons of money doing it.

Nowadays, I can record a half hour audio file at home, and without spending a nickel, ship it to Germany, get paid via PayPal, and have the money in my bank account, all within about fifteen minutes. You'll appreciate that technology more if you ever spent $200 for a phone line to go two miles for a one hour broadcast. (Or if, like Mike, you've used car jumper cables, band-aids, duct tape and clothespins to get audio into the phone lines in the past.)

1c

Re: The "Good Old Days of Telephone Remote Feeds

Mon Mar 14, 2016 6:54 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Mike Duke"

I had forgotten about that little speaker for the permanent mouthpiece.

I saw one at one station I visited, but never had to use it where I worked.

After modular phone cords came along, one station where I worked got really fancy. They had a hard shell briefcase with a telephone, isolating audio coupler, and a small mixer mounted inside.

You plugged in the phone, dialed the number of the station, or had the station call you, muted the mouthpiece with a switch, and worked everything through the mixer and headphones.

When you were done, you rolled up the cables, put the microphone and headphones back into the briefcase, re-connected the regular telephone, and that was all there was to it.

I occasionally run into old packages like that at ham radio flea markets.

MD

Posted by:

"Bill Pasco"

Well now Mike, I've certainly heard about that method of remote feeds,
being well read and all, but I'm way to young to have actually done
that. You are much older than I after all. LOL

Posted by:

"Mike Duke"

I failed to mention, they actually taught us how to set up that way in my broadcast production lab class in college.


Re: The "Good Old Days of Telephone Remote Feeds

Mon Mar 14, 2016 2:01 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

"Chuck Adkins"

Yes, I've used the alligator clip method. I've also used a round plastic thing called a wonder loop. Yes, I've done beepball (a game using a ball that has audio so people who are blind can track its location) with a cellphone. There were also the Marty units I have used on about 166 megs in my commercial radio days.


 



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Re: WJMA/WSVS connection

Chuck Brown
 


Hey Ross, it looks like I got the wrong person-----it looks like Don Greene is the one responsible for the moves between WSVS and WJMA, since he seems to be the first one of us to have worked in Orange.  I first met Don when I worked in Crewe.  I don't know where Don came from, but I think he lived in Chase City, when he worked in South Hill.  After 60 some years, my mind is a little foggy.
 
Chuck.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2016 8:46 AM
Subject: Re: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 



Ross,
            I think you can thank Tubby Walthall for that.  I don't know how he got to WJMA from WSVS, but I had left WSVS and gone with WKLV in Blackstone as my first stint behind the mike as Engineer/DJ.  I left Blackstone and went back to Belle Glade, Florida where I started in November 1948.  I got word from yet another former WSVS employee, that Tubby was in Orange, Virginia as manager of WJMA and needed an announcer.  Things were not going my way at that time, so I called him and he hired me.  That is a very abreviated version  of the story.  Tubby, Don Greene, and I were all at WSVS at the same time, and we all ended up in South Hill.
Regards
Chuck
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 15, 2016 7:38 AM
Subject: Re: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 

Chuck,


I’m sorry I missed that connection. I only have noted in my data where people went after WJMA, not before. Thanks for adding to the history and it looks like I need to update your “after WJMA” information. I should probably add a “prior to WJMA” column to the All-Time Staff List. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA all-time staff list.htm

Can you shed any light on the connection between WSVS and WJMA.Why did people move back and forth between the stations?

Ross

..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Feb 14, 2016, at 9:04 PM, 'Chuck Brown' chuck1927@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:



I also worked at both stations through the years-------WSVS AM/FM, as engineer circa 1950 and WJMA parts of 1953------and 1954------and ended up at WJWS/WSHV from July 12, 1954 until September 1988 as Chief Engineer/DJ, when I finally retired from Broadcast Radio.  Chuck Brown, South Hill, Va.
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2016 8:03 PM
Subject: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 

Greg Breeden (WJMA 1994-2001 ) has posed the following on his Facebook page:

………………………..

As most of you know, I have left Big Country 105.3 (WBNN Dillwyn, ed) where I have spent the last 15 years as an on-air personality, as well as program director, music director, production director and general manager among many other titles (or "hats") that I've held over the years. Tomorrow I start a new chapter in my professional life as I take on new challenges with radio station WSVS AM 800 and 97.1 FM in Crewe, VA. WSVS has been around for almost 70 years and stands as one of the most historic radio stations in the business where the likes of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs have played in the live music studio that still operates today. I hope I will be able to contribute to WSVS so it will live on as Virginia's Country Legend. There's a lot of work ahead and soon I will be on the air doing afternoon drive time. 

………………………...

There are two previous connections between WJMA and WSVS that come to mind. 

In July 1952, Donald Greene left the Assistant Manger position to WJMA to be a "sports editor”  at WSVS. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA articles/1952-7-17 Greene leaves.jpg  And in May 1954 Alfred “Tubby” Walthall left the General Manager position at WJMA to be Assistant Manager at WJWS in South Hill. He said the job change would give him more time on the air. I recall Welford Sherman told me there were “creative differences”, but I don’t recall the specifics. I may have it on tape somewhere. “Tubby” is credited with beginning a 50 year run of broadcasting Orange High School Football. Walthall was originally from Crew, the location of WSVS where he had been Sports Director.

Ross
71-86







Re: WJMA/WSVS connection

Chuck Brown
 


Ross,
            I think you can thank Tubby Walthall for that.  I don't know how he got to WJMA from WSVS, but I had left WSVS and gone with WKLV in Blackstone as my first stint behind the mike as Engineer/DJ.  I left Blackstone and went back to Belle Glade, Florida where I started in November 1948.  I got word from yet another former WSVS employee, that Tubby was in Orange, Virginia as manager of WJMA and needed an announcer.  Things were not going my way at that time, so I called him and he hired me.  That is a very abreviated version  of the story.  Tubby, Don Greene, and I were all at WSVS at the same time, and we all ended up in South Hill.
Regards
Chuck

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 15, 2016 7:38 AM
Subject: Re: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 

Chuck,


I’m sorry I missed that connection. I only have noted in my data where people went after WJMA, not before. Thanks for adding to the history and it looks like I need to update your “after WJMA” information. I should probably add a “prior to WJMA” column to the All-Time Staff List. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA all-time staff list.htm

Can you shed any light on the connection between WSVS and WJMA.Why did people move back and forth between the stations?

Ross

..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Feb 14, 2016, at 9:04 PM, 'Chuck Brown' chuck1927@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:



I also worked at both stations through the years-------WSVS AM/FM, as engineer circa 1950 and WJMA parts of 1953------and 1954------and ended up at WJWS/WSHV from July 12, 1954 until September 1988 as Chief Engineer/DJ, when I finally retired from Broadcast Radio.  Chuck Brown, South Hill, Va.
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2016 8:03 PM
Subject: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 

Greg Breeden (WJMA 1994-2001 ) has posed the following on his Facebook page:

………………………..

As most of you know, I have left Big Country 105.3 (WBNN Dillwyn, ed) where I have spent the last 15 years as an on-air personality, as well as program director, music director, production director and general manager among many other titles (or "hats") that I've held over the years. Tomorrow I start a new chapter in my professional life as I take on new challenges with radio station WSVS AM 800 and 97.1 FM in Crewe, VA. WSVS has been around for almost 70 years and stands as one of the most historic radio stations in the business where the likes of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs have played in the live music studio that still operates today. I hope I will be able to contribute to WSVS so it will live on as Virginia's Country Legend. There's a lot of work ahead and soon I will be on the air doing afternoon drive time. 

………………………...

There are two previous connections between WJMA and WSVS that come to mind. 

In July 1952, Donald Greene left the Assistant Manger position to WJMA to be a "sports editor”  at WSVS. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA articles/1952-7-17 Greene leaves.jpg  And in May 1954 Alfred “Tubby” Walthall left the General Manager position at WJMA to be Assistant Manager at WJWS in South Hill. He said the job change would give him more time on the air. I recall Welford Sherman told me there were “creative differences”, but I don’t recall the specifics. I may have it on tape somewhere. “Tubby” is credited with beginning a 50 year run of broadcasting Orange High School Football. Walthall was originally from Crew, the location of WSVS where he had been Sports Director.

Ross
71-86







Re: WJMA/WSVS connection

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Chuck,

I’m sorry I missed that connection. I only have noted in my data where people went after WJMA, not before. Thanks for adding to the history and it looks like I need to update your “after WJMA” information. I should probably add a “prior to WJMA” column to the All-Time Staff List. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA all-time staff list.htm

Can you shed any light on the connection between WSVS and WJMA.Why did people move back and forth between the stations?

Ross

..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Feb 14, 2016, at 9:04 PM, 'Chuck Brown' chuck1927@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:



I also worked at both stations through the years-------WSVS AM/FM, as engineer circa 1950 and WJMA parts of 1953------and 1954------and ended up at WJWS/WSHV from July 12, 1954 until September 1988 as Chief Engineer/DJ, when I finally retired from Broadcast Radio.  Chuck Brown, South Hill, Va.
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2016 8:03 PM
Subject: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 

Greg Breeden (WJMA 1994-2001 ) has posed the following on his Facebook page:

………………………..

As most of you know, I have left Big Country 105.3 (WBNN Dillwyn, ed) where I have spent the last 15 years as an on-air personality, as well as program director, music director, production director and general manager among many other titles (or "hats") that I've held over the years. Tomorrow I start a new chapter in my professional life as I take on new challenges with radio station WSVS AM 800 and 97.1 FM in Crewe, VA. WSVS has been around for almost 70 years and stands as one of the most historic radio stations in the business where the likes of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs have played in the live music studio that still operates today. I hope I will be able to contribute to WSVS so it will live on as Virginia's Country Legend. There's a lot of work ahead and soon I will be on the air doing afternoon drive time. 

………………………...

There are two previous connections between WJMA and WSVS that come to mind. 

In July 1952, Donald Greene left the Assistant Manger position to WJMA to be a "sports editor”  at WSVS. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA articles/1952-7-17 Greene leaves.jpg  And in May 1954 Alfred “Tubby” Walthall left the General Manager position at WJMA to be Assistant Manager at WJWS in South Hill. He said the job change would give him more time on the air. I recall Welford Sherman told me there were “creative differences”, but I don’t recall the specifics. I may have it on tape somewhere. “Tubby” is credited with beginning a 50 year run of broadcasting Orange High School Football. Walthall was originally from Crew, the location of WSVS where he had been Sports Director.

Ross
71-86







Re: WJMA/WSVS connection

Chuck Brown
 


I also worked at both stations through the years-------WSVS AM/FM, as engineer circa 1950 and WJMA parts of 1953------and 1954------and ended up at WJWS/WSHV from July 12, 1954 until September 1988 as Chief Engineer/DJ, when I finally retired from Broadcast Radio.  Chuck Brown, South Hill, Va.

Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2016 8:03 PM
Subject: [WJMA] WJMA/WSVS connection

 

Greg Breeden (WJMA 1994-2001 ) has posed the following on his Facebook page:

………………………..

As most of you know, I have left Big Country 105.3 (WBNN Dillwyn, ed) where I have spent the last 15 years as an on-air personality, as well as program director, music director, production director and general manager among many other titles (or "hats") that I've held over the years. Tomorrow I start a new chapter in my professional life as I take on new challenges with radio station WSVS AM 800 and 97.1 FM in Crewe, VA. WSVS has been around for almost 70 years and stands as one of the most historic radio stations in the business where the likes of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs have played in the live music studio that still operates today. I hope I will be able to contribute to WSVS so it will live on as Virginia's Country Legend. There's a lot of work ahead and soon I will be on the air doing afternoon drive time.

………………………...

There are two previous connections between WJMA and WSVS that come to mind. 

In July 1952, Donald Greene left the Assistant Manger position to WJMA to be a "sports editor”  at WSVS. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA articles/1952-7-17 Greene leaves.jpg  And in May 1954 Alfred “Tubby” Walthall left the General Manager position at WJMA to be Assistant Manager at WJWS in South Hill. He said the job change would give him more time on the air. I recall Welford Sherman told me there were “creative differences”, but I don’t recall the specifics. I may have it on tape somewhere. “Tubby” is credited with beginning a 50 year run of broadcasting Orange High School Football. Walthall was originally from Crew, the location of WSVS where he had been Sports Director.

Ross
71-86



WJMA/WSVS connection

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Greg Breeden (WJMA 1994-2001 ) has posed the following on his Facebook page:
………………………..

As most of you know, I have left Big Country 105.3 (WBNN Dillwyn, ed) where I have spent the last 15 years as an on-air personality, as well as program director, music director, production director and general manager among many other titles (or "hats") that I've held over the years. Tomorrow I start a new chapter in my professional life as I take on new challenges with radio station WSVS AM 800 and 97.1 FM in Crewe, VA. WSVS has been around for almost 70 years and stands as one of the most historic radio stations in the business where the likes of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs have played in the live music studio that still operates today. I hope I will be able to contribute to WSVS so it will live on as Virginia's Country Legend. There's a lot of work ahead and soon I will be on the air doing afternoon drive time.

………………………...

There are two previous connections between WJMA and WSVS that come to mind. 

In July 1952, Donald Greene left the Assistant Manger position to WJMA to be a "sports editor”  at WSVS. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA articles/1952-7-17 Greene leaves.jpg  And in May 1954 Alfred “Tubby” Walthall left the General Manager position at WJMA to be Assistant Manager at WJWS in South Hill. He said the job change would give him more time on the air. I recall Welford Sherman told me there were “creative differences”, but I don’t recall the specifics. I may have it on tape somewhere. “Tubby” is credited with beginning a 50 year run of broadcasting Orange High School Football. Walthall was originally from Crew, the location of WSVS where he had been Sports Director.

Ross
71-86



Re: Jim Gallant

Les Myers
 

I did indeed work with Jim Gallant, a name I have not seen or heard for many, many years. I recall seeing Jim in 1975- I think that was the year -  when my wife and I attended the 25th anniversary of the Harden and Weaver program at the Kennedy Center. I didn't know Jim was working at WMAL and we kind of bumped into each other. He was involved in the on-site live "play-by-play" of the H&W broadcast, so he had little time to talk. But we had a good, albeit brief, reunion. Jim and I were in the management training program together at WMAL

I appreciate you passing this information along.
 
I was so much older then. I'm younger than that now.


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 13:28:14 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] Jim Gallant

 

I saw this on the DCRTV web site this morning:

………………………….
Mailbag posting from Frank Herzog, the former radio voice of the Redskins who was a sports anchor at Channel 7/WJLA and Channel 9/WUSA: "We would be remiss if the passing of former WMAL exec Jim Gallant is not mentioned here. He helped run one of the most-successful radio stations in the country and produced the Redskins Radio broadcasts for years. He was 'thrifty' but fair, friendly and a good person. Jim died of an apparent heart attack earlier this week at his home in Delaware
…………………………..

Arch greatly admired the operation that Gallant had at WMAL and wanted much of the same at WJMA. Arch once described WJMA as a “down home version of WMAL”.

And I think Les Myers may have worked for Jim Gallant before Les moved to Orange.

Ross
71-86


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Jim Gallant

Ross Hunter <ross@...>
 

I saw this on the DCRTV web site this morning:
………………………….
Mailbag posting from Frank Herzog, the former radio voice of the Redskins who was a sports anchor at Channel 7/WJLA and Channel 9/WUSA: "We would be remiss if the passing of former WMAL exec Jim Gallant is not mentioned here. He helped run one of the most-successful radio stations in the country and produced the Redskins Radio broadcasts for years. He was 'thrifty' but fair, friendly and a good person. Jim died of an apparent heart attack earlier this week at his home in Delaware
…………………………..

Arch greatly admired the operation that Gallant had at WMAL and wanted much of the same at WJMA. Arch once described WJMA as a “down home version of WMAL”.

And I think Les Myers may have worked for Jim Gallant before Les moved to Orange.

Ross
71-86

Re: snow stories

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

I remember when I told him I was leaving WJMA to be a social worker and parttine Realtor because I needed $1 an hour salary raise the Gordonsville Hospital gave me hoping maybe he would give it to me as well and I could stay. 

He wished me well with his even-handed tone. 

And we were friends to his last days. 

Willow (Barbara Potter)


On Jan 25, 2016, at 12:09 AM, Reid Harrison harrison.reid@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

 

Ha!  Yes, the stern but even-handed tone.  I was also very familiar with it after instances of my own less-than-praiseworthy conduct at home.

Reid


On 24 Jan 2016, at 23:59, Ann Harrison annrharrison@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:


Can't you just hear him saying every word of that letter? A distinctive voice, all right.

Thanks, Ross.


Ann Harrison
(Miss P. Message)

On Sun, Jan 24, 2016 at 5:31 PM, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:
 

Sorry, this is going to be a long post.

I've heard and read dozens of snow stories the last few days. Except for a couple of radio station groups on Facebook, I haven’t come across any mentioning radio and television’s role in announcing school closings. Broadcast’s part in getting the message out has changed over the years with the growth of the internet, text messages, email, robo calls, etc. But "back in the day" it was different. It was the radio station or a phone chain.

I recall the Arch got a letter from back in early 1977 from a UVA employee in Charlottesville complaining about the way some of his friends…teachers in Orange County…had been treated when they called WJMA asking for closing information. Specifically he mentioned:
— one was told WJMA was not allowed to give out that information
— one was told he must give his name and address
— another asked the announcer on duty if he knew if the schools were closed. “Yes, I know.” was the answer and the line disconnected.

The letter writer went on to say these instances "document a lack of service and show complete rudeness". He said his friends wanted him to contact the FCC, but he said he contact the station for a response. Earlier he’d gone through a paragraph mentioning that teachers educate Orange County students, spend money with WJMA advertisers, etc. The letter writer concluded: “It is my hope that you and your morning personnel will try to remember that those teachers are providing a valuable and fundamental service to you and the other resident of Orange County; why, they may even be educating some of your own staff’s children. Is it too much to ask for your station to show _them_ a little service and courtesy? I hope not."

I don’t know that I was the one he was writing about, but I certainly could have been “short” with someone on a very busy morning.

I was concerned that Arch would be upset with me. Arch’s letter in reply was classic:
…………...
“This broadcast facility is charged with serving its public by broadcasting, not by answering the telephone.

In this station there is only _one_ person on duty between 6 and 8am. It usually happens that when the most people want information we are most likely to have the fewest people on duty.

Our first obligation is to the listener, not the telephone.

Ross Hunter, our morning man, is married to a teacher in the Orange County school system. He knows first-hand the need for reliable communication when schools will be closed. The telephone tree relays information far more efficiently than hundreds of calls to one individual.

If your friends are employees of the county school system then they owe it to themselves and to their pupils to establish a reliable system of communication. It is they, now we, who are a fault in this.

Our responsibility is to broadcast the information. Those who cannot hear us had better make other arrangements.

I will not extend this letter too much longer, although you have raised a number of points with which I disagree. I am distressed at the petulant, selfish, vindictive tone of your letter. A State Official using taxpayer-supplied stationery and postage for such accusations should examine his motives. I think you have done the University as well as your office a disservice.

I am not sure the letter provides what you expected in the way of a suitable response, but at least you have heard from me in the near future."
……………

It wasn’t what I was expecting either. 

Within a week, the original letter writer replied:
…………...
"Thank you for your prompt response. Not only was it suitable, it was in large part, absolutely right. Thank you for helping me see that.” He went on to disagree on a few points and went on to blame the school system for not getting the word out. 
……………

Tangentially, on a radio station list this morning, one writer told of a friend getting a call at the radio station asking “Is they school today?” His friend replied “If they ain’t, you needs to go anyways.”

As long as I’ve typed this much. Here are a few more calls to stations:

“Get on the air and tell your listeners that yer off the air!!” Then you ask where are they calling from and they say "the kitchen”.

The three tenses of school "is they school"? "are they school?" and "will they be school?

"Who did that song about three years ago about that guy who is trying to forget that his girlfriend doesn't love him anymore? - you know the one I'm talking about - here - let me hum a little bit of it for you …

Ross
71-86




kudos Rob Cressman

Ross Hunter <ross@...>
 

Congratulations to former WJMA employee Rob Cressman on his new job. The article below fails to mention Rob worked at WJMA in 1991-92 after WFVA/WBQB.

Ross
71-86
=======================


Hubbard Radio
 Chicago VP/Market Manager John Gallagher & Hubbard Radio SVP/Programming Greg Solk announced today the arrival of Rob Cressman as Program Director for the recently anointed NAB Marconi Awards Rock Station of The Year WDRV-FM (The Drive).  

Cressman arrives from iHeartMedia/Indianapolis where he served as Senior Vice President of Programming for WFBQWOLTWNDE and WUBG for the past two years. Prior to Indianapolis, Cressman spent five years in New England where he oversaw Programming and Operations for Saga's WAQY and WLZX. Rob's career includes a decade as Director of Programming for CBS Radio’s (at the time Entercom's) WMFS/Memphis and eight years at the helm of WAVF/Charleston. Rob got his start in radio at WFVA/WBQB in his hometown of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Cressman says, "I am thrilled to have been invited to join the incredible talents at Hubbard Radio-Chicago and The Drive.  WDRV has always represented the platinum standard for Classic Rock Radio and I am anxious to uphold and amplify its legendary foundation.  Many thanks to Greg Solk, John Gallagher and Fred Jacobs for finding my experience and qualifications worthy of such a distinguished honor." 

Greg Solk commented, “Finding the perfect programming partner for The Drive was indeed a challenge. We needed someone who understood the rich history The Drive has had in Chicago and who could balance our past achievements with the need for innovation that is vital to our future success.  I’ve been a fan of Rob’s work for many years, and look forward to watching him lead The Drive’s incredibly talented staff to new heights.” 

Re: snow stories

Les Myers
 

Ross, this is a gem of a posting! Arch's response showed that this marshmellow had teeth!

Les

 
Do not trust an atom. They make up everything.


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 17:31:46 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] snow stories

 

Sorry, this is going to be a long post.

I've heard and read dozens of snow stories the last few days. Except for a couple of radio station groups on Facebook, I haven’t come across any mentioning radio and television’s role in announcing school closings. Broadcast’s part in getting the message out has changed over the years with the growth of the internet, text messages, email, robo calls, etc. But "back in the day" it was different. It was the radio station or a phone chain.

I recall the Arch got a letter from back in early 1977 from a UVA employee in Charlottesville complaining about the way some of his friends…teachers in Orange County…had been treated when they called WJMA asking for closing information. Specifically he mentioned:
— one was told WJMA was not allowed to give out that information
— one was told he must give his name and address
— another asked the announcer on duty if he knew if the schools were closed. “Yes, I know.” was the answer and the line disconnected.

The letter writer went on to say these instances "document a lack of service and show complete rudeness". He said his friends wanted him to contact the FCC, but he said he contact the station for a response. Earlier he’d gone through a paragraph mentioning that teachers educate Orange County students, spend money with WJMA advertisers, etc. The letter writer concluded: “It is my hope that you and your morning personnel will try to remember that those teachers are providing a valuable and fundamental service to you and the other resident of Orange County; why, they may even be educating some of your own staff’s children. Is it too much to ask for your station to show _them_ a little service and courtesy? I hope not."

I don’t know that I was the one he was writing about, but I certainly could have been “short” with someone on a very busy morning.

I was concerned that Arch would be upset with me. Arch’s letter in reply was classic:
…………...
“This broadcast facility is charged with serving its public by broadcasting, not by answering the telephone.

In this station there is only _one_ person on duty between 6 and 8am. It usually happens that when the most people want information we are most likely to have the fewest people on duty.

Our first obligation is to the listener, not the telephone.

Ross Hunter, our morning man, is married to a teacher in the Orange County school system. He knows first-hand the need for reliable communication when schools will be closed. The telephone tree relays information far more efficiently than hundreds of calls to one individual.

If your friends are employees of the county school system then they owe it to themselves and to their pupils to establish a reliable system of communication. It is they, now we, who are a fault in this.

Our responsibility is to broadcast the information. Those who cannot hear us had better make other arrangements.

I will not extend this letter too much longer, although you have raised a number of points with which I disagree. I am distressed at the petulant, selfish, vindictive tone of your letter. A State Official using taxpayer-supplied stationery and postage for such accusations should examine his motives. I think you have done the University as well as your office a disservice.

I am not sure the letter provides what you expected in the way of a suitable response, but at least you have heard from me in the near future."
……………

It wasn’t what I was expecting either. 

Within a week, the original letter writer replied:
…………...
"Thank you for your prompt response. Not only was it suitable, it was in large part, absolutely right. Thank you for helping me see that.” He went on to disagree on a few points and went on to blame the school system for not getting the word out. 
……………

Tangentially, on a radio station list this morning, one writer told of a friend getting a call at the radio station asking “Is they school today?” His friend replied “If they ain’t, you needs to go anyways.”

As long as I’ve typed this much. Here are a few more calls to stations:

“Get on the air and tell your listeners that yer off the air!!” Then you ask where are they calling from and they say "the kitchen”.

The three tenses of school "is they school"? "are they school?" and "will they be school?

"Who did that song about three years ago about that guy who is trying to forget that his girlfriend doesn't love him anymore? - you know the one I'm talking about - here - let me hum a little bit of it for you …

Ross
71-86


Re: snow stories

Reid Harrison
 

Ha!  Yes, the stern but even-handed tone.  I was also very familiar with it after instances of my own less-than-praiseworthy conduct at home.
Reid


On 24 Jan 2016, at 23:59, Ann Harrison annrharrison@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:


Can't you just hear him saying every word of that letter? A distinctive voice, all right.

Thanks, Ross.


Ann Harrison
(Miss P. Message)

On Sun, Jan 24, 2016 at 5:31 PM, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:
 

Sorry, this is going to be a long post.

I've heard and read dozens of snow stories the last few days. Except for a couple of radio station groups on Facebook, I haven’t come across any mentioning radio and television’s role in announcing school closings. Broadcast’s part in getting the message out has changed over the years with the growth of the internet, text messages, email, robo calls, etc. But "back in the day" it was different. It was the radio station or a phone chain.

I recall the Arch got a letter from back in early 1977 from a UVA employee in Charlottesville complaining about the way some of his friends…teachers in Orange County…had been treated when they called WJMA asking for closing information. Specifically he mentioned:
— one was told WJMA was not allowed to give out that information
— one was told he must give his name and address
— another asked the announcer on duty if he knew if the schools were closed. “Yes, I know.” was the answer and the line disconnected.

The letter writer went on to say these instances "document a lack of service and show complete rudeness". He said his friends wanted him to contact the FCC, but he said he contact the station for a response. Earlier he’d gone through a paragraph mentioning that teachers educate Orange County students, spend money with WJMA advertisers, etc. The letter writer concluded: “It is my hope that you and your morning personnel will try to remember that those teachers are providing a valuable and fundamental service to you and the other resident of Orange County; why, they may even be educating some of your own staff’s children. Is it too much to ask for your station to show _them_ a little service and courtesy? I hope not."

I don’t know that I was the one he was writing about, but I certainly could have been “short” with someone on a very busy morning.

I was concerned that Arch would be upset with me. Arch’s letter in reply was classic:
…………...
“This broadcast facility is charged with serving its public by broadcasting, not by answering the telephone.

In this station there is only _one_ person on duty between 6 and 8am. It usually happens that when the most people want information we are most likely to have the fewest people on duty.

Our first obligation is to the listener, not the telephone.

Ross Hunter, our morning man, is married to a teacher in the Orange County school system. He knows first-hand the need for reliable communication when schools will be closed. The telephone tree relays information far more efficiently than hundreds of calls to one individual.

If your friends are employees of the county school system then they owe it to themselves and to their pupils to establish a reliable system of communication. It is they, now we, who are a fault in this.

Our responsibility is to broadcast the information. Those who cannot hear us had better make other arrangements.

I will not extend this letter too much longer, although you have raised a number of points with which I disagree. I am distressed at the petulant, selfish, vindictive tone of your letter. A State Official using taxpayer-supplied stationery and postage for such accusations should examine his motives. I think you have done the University as well as your office a disservice.

I am not sure the letter provides what you expected in the way of a suitable response, but at least you have heard from me in the near future."
……………

It wasn’t what I was expecting either. 

Within a week, the original letter writer replied:
…………...
"Thank you for your prompt response. Not only was it suitable, it was in large part, absolutely right. Thank you for helping me see that.” He went on to disagree on a few points and went on to blame the school system for not getting the word out. 
……………

Tangentially, on a radio station list this morning, one writer told of a friend getting a call at the radio station asking “Is they school today?” His friend replied “If they ain’t, you needs to go anyways.”

As long as I’ve typed this much. Here are a few more calls to stations:

“Get on the air and tell your listeners that yer off the air!!” Then you ask where are they calling from and they say "the kitchen”.

The three tenses of school "is they school"? "are they school?" and "will they be school?

"Who did that song about three years ago about that guy who is trying to forget that his girlfriend doesn't love him anymore? - you know the one I'm talking about - here - let me hum a little bit of it for you …

Ross
71-86




Re: snow stories

Ann Harrison Walker
 

Can't you just hear him saying every word of that letter? A distinctive voice, all right.

Thanks, Ross.


Ann Harrison
(Miss P. Message)

On Sun, Jan 24, 2016 at 5:31 PM, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:
 

Sorry, this is going to be a long post.

I've heard and read dozens of snow stories the last few days. Except for a couple of radio station groups on Facebook, I haven’t come across any mentioning radio and television’s role in announcing school closings. Broadcast’s part in getting the message out has changed over the years with the growth of the internet, text messages, email, robo calls, etc. But "back in the day" it was different. It was the radio station or a phone chain.

I recall the Arch got a letter from back in early 1977 from a UVA employee in Charlottesville complaining about the way some of his friends…teachers in Orange County…had been treated when they called WJMA asking for closing information. Specifically he mentioned:
— one was told WJMA was not allowed to give out that information
— one was told he must give his name and address
— another asked the announcer on duty if he knew if the schools were closed. “Yes, I know.” was the answer and the line disconnected.

The letter writer went on to say these instances "document a lack of service and show complete rudeness". He said his friends wanted him to contact the FCC, but he said he contact the station for a response. Earlier he’d gone through a paragraph mentioning that teachers educate Orange County students, spend money with WJMA advertisers, etc. The letter writer concluded: “It is my hope that you and your morning personnel will try to remember that those teachers are providing a valuable and fundamental service to you and the other resident of Orange County; why, they may even be educating some of your own staff’s children. Is it too much to ask for your station to show _them_ a little service and courtesy? I hope not."

I don’t know that I was the one he was writing about, but I certainly could have been “short” with someone on a very busy morning.

I was concerned that Arch would be upset with me. Arch’s letter in reply was classic:
…………...
“This broadcast facility is charged with serving its public by broadcasting, not by answering the telephone.

In this station there is only _one_ person on duty between 6 and 8am. It usually happens that when the most people want information we are most likely to have the fewest people on duty.

Our first obligation is to the listener, not the telephone.

Ross Hunter, our morning man, is married to a teacher in the Orange County school system. He knows first-hand the need for reliable communication when schools will be closed. The telephone tree relays information far more efficiently than hundreds of calls to one individual.

If your friends are employees of the county school system then they owe it to themselves and to their pupils to establish a reliable system of communication. It is they, now we, who are a fault in this.

Our responsibility is to broadcast the information. Those who cannot hear us had better make other arrangements.

I will not extend this letter too much longer, although you have raised a number of points with which I disagree. I am distressed at the petulant, selfish, vindictive tone of your letter. A State Official using taxpayer-supplied stationery and postage for such accusations should examine his motives. I think you have done the University as well as your office a disservice.

I am not sure the letter provides what you expected in the way of a suitable response, but at least you have heard from me in the near future."
……………

It wasn’t what I was expecting either. 

Within a week, the original letter writer replied:
…………...
"Thank you for your prompt response. Not only was it suitable, it was in large part, absolutely right. Thank you for helping me see that.” He went on to disagree on a few points and went on to blame the school system for not getting the word out. 
……………

Tangentially, on a radio station list this morning, one writer told of a friend getting a call at the radio station asking “Is they school today?” His friend replied “If they ain’t, you needs to go anyways.”

As long as I’ve typed this much. Here are a few more calls to stations:

“Get on the air and tell your listeners that yer off the air!!” Then you ask where are they calling from and they say "the kitchen”.

The three tenses of school "is they school"? "are they school?" and "will they be school?

"Who did that song about three years ago about that guy who is trying to forget that his girlfriend doesn't love him anymore? - you know the one I'm talking about - here - let me hum a little bit of it for you …

Ross
71-86


snow stories

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Sorry, this is going to be a long post.

I've heard and read dozens of snow stories the last few days. Except for a couple of radio station groups on Facebook, I haven’t come across any mentioning radio and television’s role in announcing school closings. Broadcast’s part in getting the message out has changed over the years with the growth of the internet, text messages, email, robo calls, etc. But "back in the day" it was different. It was the radio station or a phone chain.

I recall the Arch got a letter from back in early 1977 from a UVA employee in Charlottesville complaining about the way some of his friends…teachers in Orange County…had been treated when they called WJMA asking for closing information. Specifically he mentioned:
— one was told WJMA was not allowed to give out that information
— one was told he must give his name and address
— another asked the announcer on duty if he knew if the schools were closed. “Yes, I know.” was the answer and the line disconnected.

The letter writer went on to say these instances "document a lack of service and show complete rudeness". He said his friends wanted him to contact the FCC, but he said he contact the station for a response. Earlier he’d gone through a paragraph mentioning that teachers educate Orange County students, spend money with WJMA advertisers, etc. The letter writer concluded: “It is my hope that you and your morning personnel will try to remember that those teachers are providing a valuable and fundamental service to you and the other resident of Orange County; why, they may even be educating some of your own staff’s children. Is it too much to ask for your station to show _them_ a little service and courtesy? I hope not."

I don’t know that I was the one he was writing about, but I certainly could have been “short” with someone on a very busy morning.

I was concerned that Arch would be upset with me. Arch’s letter in reply was classic:
…………...
“This broadcast facility is charged with serving its public by broadcasting, not by answering the telephone.

In this station there is only _one_ person on duty between 6 and 8am. It usually happens that when the most people want information we are most likely to have the fewest people on duty.

Our first obligation is to the listener, not the telephone.

Ross Hunter, our morning man, is married to a teacher in the Orange County school system. He knows first-hand the need for reliable communication when schools will be closed. The telephone tree relays information far more efficiently than hundreds of calls to one individual.

If your friends are employees of the county school system then they owe it to themselves and to their pupils to establish a reliable system of communication. It is they, now we, who are a fault in this.

Our responsibility is to broadcast the information. Those who cannot hear us had better make other arrangements.

I will not extend this letter too much longer, although you have raised a number of points with which I disagree. I am distressed at the petulant, selfish, vindictive tone of your letter. A State Official using taxpayer-supplied stationery and postage for such accusations should examine his motives. I think you have done the University as well as your office a disservice.

I am not sure the letter provides what you expected in the way of a suitable response, but at least you have heard from me in the near future."
……………

It wasn’t what I was expecting either. 

Within a week, the original letter writer replied:
…………...
"Thank you for your prompt response. Not only was it suitable, it was in large part, absolutely right. Thank you for helping me see that.” He went on to disagree on a few points and went on to blame the school system for not getting the word out. 
……………

Tangentially, on a radio station list this morning, one writer told of a friend getting a call at the radio station asking “Is they school today?” His friend replied “If they ain’t, you needs to go anyways.”

As long as I’ve typed this much. Here are a few more calls to stations:

“Get on the air and tell your listeners that yer off the air!!” Then you ask where are they calling from and they say "the kitchen”.

The three tenses of school "is they school"? "are they school?" and "will they be school?

"Who did that song about three years ago about that guy who is trying to forget that his girlfriend doesn't love him anymore? - you know the one I'm talking about - here - let me hum a little bit of it for you …

Ross
71-86

Re: Mulder & Scully, Bart, and Reid

Les Myers
 

And we "knew him when." Thanks for sending this.

Les
Back when we knew him when...
 
Do not trust an atom. They make up everything.


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 07:30:50 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] Mulder & Scully, Bart, and Reid

 

Here’s a link to a New York Times article on a Simpsons episode that was a tip of the hat to The X Files. It includes comments from writer Reid Harrison.


Ross
71-86


Free Online Photosharing - Share your photos online with your friends and family!
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Mulder & Scully, Bart, and Reid

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Here’s a link to a New York Times article on a Simpsons episode that was a tip of the hat to The X Files. It includes comments from writer Reid Harrison.


Ross
71-86

Re: Waugh closing

Les Myers
 

Yeah. What other idiot would park his two wheels in FRONT of the Walker Center rather than hiding it in the garage below? That's all right. I have forgiven the culprit.
 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 04 Jan 2016 16:57:29 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

Oh, Les! Was that YOUR motorcycle?

On Jan 4, 2016, at 4:19 PM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

 

I'm guessing around 150-160,000. But this is wild guess. The odometer turned back to zero after 99,999. Last June I had to give up a 1996 Honda Civic to rust. It had 352,000 miles. Original tires. (Just kidding.) I have a new-off-the-lot Honda Civic

I also bought a Honda 550 motorcycle from Don Waugh. I remember riding it to Woodberry Forest School when weather permitted, giving some little urchins a chance to flatten one of the tires. I got it repaired, and they flattened it again. Twice in a week.

 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 21:44:53 +0100
To: wjma@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

Les, how many miles do you think you put on it?  We had a Datsun station wagon from Waugh’s that served the folks well before being turned over to Ann for her days down in Williamsburg, if memory serves.  Great little car!


On Jan 4, 2016, at 9:42 PM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

That ad was funny... before the serious onus on smoking and health. I bought a 1974 new-off-the-lot Datsun pickup truck from Waugh. That truck- with a camper top that I added soon after - took me to jobs in Harrisonburg, Birmingham, and to Maine. It carried Sue, Angela and Muffins (both riding in the back), our luggage and me from Birmingham to Albuquerque, New Mexico for Christmas 1978. It carried Sue, Muffins and me to Maine and Nova Scotia in 1980 or so. Thousands and thousands of miles until it refused to pass inspection because of rust. We laugh about the travels we made in that truck, but it owed me nothing when it was towed to the graveyard in 1990 or 91 - I forget the year.The ashtray was never used except for loose change.

Les Four-Speed

 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 14:49:22 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

It was announced a while back that Waugh (now Waugh Harley Davison) had sold to a Northern Virginia automotive group. A few weeks ago they had an auction of inventory. Last week's Orange Review had a story with Don and Marcellene Waugh. http://www.dailyprogress.com/orangenews/entertainment_life/waughs-wrap-up-a-good-run-at-orange-dealership/article_fd4d933e-af33-11e5-9154-938eb441dbda.html


Here's a old WJMA commercial for Datsun cars at PD Waugh. I'm not sure about the date, but guess it's early 1970s. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA audio/WJMA commercials/PD Waugh Datsun 197-.mp3

Ross
71-86


Free Online Photosharing - Share your photos online with your friends and family!
Visit http://www.inbox.com/photosharing to find out more!



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Free 3D Earth Screensaver
Watch the Earth right on your desktop! Check it out at www.inbox.com/earth


Free Online Photosharing - Share your photos online with your friends and family!
Visit http://www.inbox.com/photosharing to find out more!

Re: Waugh closing

Chap Harrison
 

Oh, Les! Was that YOUR motorcycle?

On Jan 4, 2016, at 4:19 PM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

 

I'm guessing around 150-160,000. But this is wild guess. The odometer turned back to zero after 99,999. Last June I had to give up a 1996 Honda Civic to rust. It had 352,000 miles. Original tires. (Just kidding.) I have a new-off-the-lot Honda Civic

I also bought a Honda 550 motorcycle from Don Waugh. I remember riding it to Woodberry Forest School when weather permitted, giving some little urchins a chance to flatten one of the tires. I got it repaired, and they flattened it again. Twice in a week.

 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 21:44:53 +0100
To: wjma@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

Les, how many miles do you think you put on it?  We had a Datsun station wagon from Waugh’s that served the folks well before being turned over to Ann for her days down in Williamsburg, if memory serves.  Great little car!


On Jan 4, 2016, at 9:42 PM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

That ad was funny... before the serious onus on smoking and health. I bought a 1974 new-off-the-lot Datsun pickup truck from Waugh. That truck- with a camper top that I added soon after - took me to jobs in Harrisonburg, Birmingham, and to Maine. It carried Sue, Angela and Muffins (both riding in the back), our luggage and me from Birmingham to Albuquerque, New Mexico for Christmas 1978. It carried Sue, Muffins and me to Maine and Nova Scotia in 1980 or so. Thousands and thousands of miles until it refused to pass inspection because of rust. We laugh about the travels we made in that truck, but it owed me nothing when it was towed to the graveyard in 1990 or 91 - I forget the year.The ashtray was never used except for loose change.

Les Four-Speed

 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 14:49:22 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

It was announced a while back that Waugh (now Waugh Harley Davison) had sold to a Northern Virginia automotive group. A few weeks ago they had an auction of inventory. Last week's Orange Review had a story with Don and Marcellene Waugh. http://www.dailyprogress.com/orangenews/entertainment_life/waughs-wrap-up-a-good-run-at-orange-dealership/article_fd4d933e-af33-11e5-9154-938eb441dbda.html


Here's a old WJMA commercial for Datsun cars at PD Waugh. I'm not sure about the date, but guess it's early 1970s. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA audio/WJMA commercials/PD Waugh Datsun 197-.mp3

Ross
71-86


Free Online Photosharing - Share your photos online with your friends and family!
Visit http://www.inbox.com/photosharing to find out more!



3D Earth Screensaver Preview
Free 3D Earth Screensaver
Watch the Earth right on your desktop! Check it out at www.inbox.com/earth

Re: Waugh closing

Les Myers
 

I'm guessing around 150-160,000. But this is wild guess. The odometer turned back to zero after 99,999. Last June I had to give up a 1996 Honda Civic to rust. It had 352,000 miles. Original tires. (Just kidding.) I have a new-off-the-lot Honda Civic

I also bought a Honda 550 motorcycle from Don Waugh. I remember riding it to Woodberry Forest School when weather permitted, giving some little urchins a chance to flatten one of the tires. I got it repaired, and they flattened it again. Twice in a week.
 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 21:44:53 +0100
To: wjma@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

Les, how many miles do you think you put on it?  We had a Datsun station wagon from Waugh’s that served the folks well before being turned over to Ann for her days down in Williamsburg, if memory serves.  Great little car!


On Jan 4, 2016, at 9:42 PM, Les Myers baroque@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

That ad was funny... before the serious onus on smoking and health. I bought a 1974 new-off-the-lot Datsun pickup truck from Waugh. That truck- with a camper top that I added soon after - took me to jobs in Harrisonburg, Birmingham, and to Maine. It carried Sue, Angela and Muffins (both riding in the back), our luggage and me from Birmingham to Albuquerque, New Mexico for Christmas 1978. It carried Sue, Muffins and me to Maine and Nova Scotia in 1980 or so. Thousands and thousands of miles until it refused to pass inspection because of rust. We laugh about the travels we made in that truck, but it owed me nothing when it was towed to the graveyard in 1990 or 91 - I forget the year.The ashtray was never used except for loose change.

Les Four-Speed

 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 14:49:22 -0500
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] Waugh closing

 

It was announced a while back that Waugh (now Waugh Harley Davison) had sold to a Northern Virginia automotive group. A few weeks ago they had an auction of inventory. Last week's Orange Review had a story with Don and Marcellene Waugh. http://www.dailyprogress.com/orangenews/entertainment_life/waughs-wrap-up-a-good-run-at-orange-dealership/article_fd4d933e-af33-11e5-9154-938eb441dbda.html


Here's a old WJMA commercial for Datsun cars at PD Waugh. I'm not sure about the date, but guess it's early 1970s. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA audio/WJMA commercials/PD Waugh Datsun 197-.mp3

Ross
71-86


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