Date   
Roger Anderson

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Just got word from Tom Graves that Roger Anderson has died. 

Those who remember Pat Watson will remember the ever present, ever pleasant Roger.


Ross
71-86

moving list to Groups.io

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

With some luck, in the next few days I’ll be moving the WJMA list from Yahoo Groups to Groups.io. Many of the Yahoo Groups I belong to have made the switch. There is some concern that Verizon, who now owns Yahoo, will kill off groups.

Why? I’ll let Mark Fletcher explain.
================================
I started the service ONElist in 1998. ONElist made it easy for people to create, manage, run and find email groups. As it grew over the next two and a half years, we expanded, changed our name to eGroups, and, in the summer of 2000, were acquired by Yahoo. The service was renamed Yahoo Groups, and I left the company to pursue other startups.

Yahoo Groups and Google Groups both exude the dank air of benign neglect. Google Groups hasn’t been updated in years, and some of Yahoo’s recent changes have actually made Yahoo Groups worse!
================================

There’s nothing you need to do. A new group will be created, you will be subscribed, you will get a welcome message, and messages should come to you as people post. However, if you have a @yahoo.com email address you may have problems. Yahoo has been marking messages from groups.io as span and that results in your removal from the Groups.io list. The people at groups.io are trying to find a solution. It appears Yahoo doesn’t want to loose groups and is making it difficult. You may get a message from Groups.io telling you how to resubscribe. It has to be done within 3 days.

Let me know if you have problems and I can probably give you a link to manually resubscribe.

Ross
71-86

saw this on Facebook

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

You might enjoy the following comments on a recent Facebook thread.

Ross
71-86
==========

Matthew C. Peregoy Hey all...I am trying to remember the Orange radio station call number/ letters from the 80s...I remember there was a guy that went by KP as the dj and each time before he'd go on, an announcer would say "hey kids, what time is it"....wasn't that from the old howdy doody show?...


Matthew C. Peregoy No, not the phone number...I mean, like C'ville is 97.5, etc...

Matthew C. Peregoy for some reason 96.7 sticks in my head...was that it?

Jody Shelton yes 96.7 WJMA

Eddie Estes Yep 96.7.

Ross Hunter It was 96.7 from 1971 until 2001 when it switched to 98.9. Then in late 2002 in moved to the old WCUL location of 103.1. That's where it is today.

Lots of WJMA history at this site. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net

Jody Shelton 96.7 WJMA


Matthew C. Peregoy See, I should have known that...lol...Who was the DJ that went by "KP"?....

Tonya Breeden Estes was it J.D. Slade??

Tonya Breeden Estes Ken “KP” Pratt

Matthew C. Peregoy JD was on there too at the time....But I don't think I ever knew Ken...outside of being called "KP" that is...lol....

Matthew C. Peregoy I don't know what suddenly made me think of this...someone else did a post on here about radio call letters from the past I think...

Pat Thomas I dont remember KP...I remember JD...


Jill Solek-Giles You might remember it as WVJZ or WJMA

Jill Solek-Giles Z96.7 was the familiar name. I remember calling in to win a "z-pack" back then (and it wasn't just an antibiotic for respiratory infections)!


Terry Dillon Late 60s ,early 70s it was WJMA.

Tony Sprouse good ole WJMA and JD Slade. Who remembers the "swap shop" that came on every week day morning?

Bobby Coiner WJMA - 1340 on your am dial

James Booker Jr How about when they use to cover Hornets sports

Kemp Carpenter Clint ESTES

Kemp Carpenter Phil Goodwin & Autobear ( spelling)

Charlotte Whitbeck I remember the Swap Shop, letters to Santa and wasnt it Pat Watson who did a lot behind the scenes? 
I will always remember the parade where a "band" marched with radios turned to the station. I thought it was such a clever thing!

Joan Mench Clark 672-1000 Swap Shop. Loved it.

Margaret Tanner Correct am dial

Stacy Plasse 672-1212 weather

Nancy Sherman Burton JM is for James Madison

Jim Tucker Monday’s at one.

Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Good catch on the meeting dates. It should be 21-23. 12-23 sounds like a vacation at the beach.

Ross
..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Jun 3, 2018, at 11:27 PM, formwalt formwalt@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:


This is well-deserved recogition for Phil, and it honors the WJMA legacy as well. Congrats, Phil!
May wish to check the dates of the VAB meeting.
Alex 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "'Patricia McArver' pmcarver@... [WJMA]" <WJMA@...> 
Date: 6/3/18 4:59 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: RE: [WJMA] Phil Goodwin honor

 

Proud that I had the opportunity to work early mornings with this talented man.  He really could do everything….bolstered by lots of coffee!  Congratulations, Phil.

 

Patricia McArver

1978-1982

 

From: WJMA@... [mailto:WJMA@...] 
Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2018 3:19 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Phil Goodwin honor

 

  

Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

 

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

 

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”

 

 

 




Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Alex Formwalt
 

This is well-deserved recogition for Phil, and it honors the WJMA legacy as well. Congrats, Phil!
May wish to check the dates of the VAB meeting.
Alex 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "'Patricia McArver' pmcarver@... [WJMA]" <WJMA@...>
Date: 6/3/18 4:59 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: WJMA@...
Subject: RE: [WJMA] Phil Goodwin honor

 

Proud that I had the opportunity to work early mornings with this talented man.  He really could do everything….bolstered by lots of coffee!  Congratulations, Phil.

 

Patricia McArver

1978-1982

 

From: WJMA@... [mailto:WJMA@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2018 3:19 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Phil Goodwin honor

 

 

Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

 

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

 

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”

 

 

 

Award

Molly Hoffman
 

Congratulations, Phil. Great work!
Molly Hoffman

Great recognition Phil

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

I remember working the Swap Shop with you all back in the late ‘70’s and the day the lady wanted to sell her “parasol” only to find out...it “you know... cuts woo-ud.”

Working at WJMA was great fun!
When shall we have another reunion? “Pat Watson” is almost 25’ tall now and the squirrels love her.

Barbara (Willow) Potter Drinkwater

Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Clint Estes
 

Phil, my sincere congrats for a job well done!  
Think of you often and yes I am still listening on the way to work!  I even remember George Bowles.

                                                         Clint



-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA]
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 3, 2018 3:19 pm
Subject: [WJMA] Phil Goodwin honor

 
Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”



Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Jay Kiernan
 

Congratulations, Phil! Nice going!

All I ever won was the coveted Pat Watson Award for the Whust Newscast EVAH!

You have come quite a way from one time, back in the late seventies, when you were filling in for Ross on Swap Shop one morning, and a nice lady called in to try to sell a "unifoam." You had a lovely chat with her, and eventually realized that what she was offering for sale was a UNIFORM. I don't know how many times you mentioned that unifoam during that conversation on the air, but I had a good giggle over that!

Also, I did not know that Andy Rooney had presented you with another award, and mentioned to you that he had heard AND liked your story!!! That really impressed me because I don't think that Andy Rooney ever liked ANYTHING!!!

I recall that most of his bits on 60 Minutes seemed to begin with the phrase, "Don't you just hate it when..."

Keep up the good work, Phil!

Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Patricia Mcarver
 

Proud that I had the opportunity to work early mornings with this talented man.  He really could do everything….bolstered by lots of coffee!  Congratulations, Phil.

 

Patricia McArver

1978-1982

 

From: WJMA@... [mailto:WJMA@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2018 3:19 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Phil Goodwin honor

 

 

Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

 

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

 

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”

 

 

 

Re: Phil Goodwin honor

John Lee
 

Congratulations!

John Lee, Radio Orange Class of ‘86




On Sunday, June 3, 2018, 3:25 PM, Gardner gardner15@... [WJMA] wrote:

 

That is really cool. Congratulations, Phil, from Gary and me!
Jane

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On Jun 3, 2018 3:19 PM, "Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA]" wrote:

Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”



Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Gary & Jane Gardner
 

That is really cool. Congratulations, Phil, from Gary and me!
Jane

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid

On Jun 3, 2018 3:19 PM, "Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA]" <WJMA@...> wrote:

Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”



Re: Phil Goodwin honor

Reid Harrison
 

Wow!  Congratulations, Phil!

On Jun 3, 2018, at 21:19, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:


Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”





Phil Goodwin honor

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Phil Goodwin is the 2018 recipient of the George A. Bowles Jr. Award for Distinguished Performance in Broadcast News, awarded annually by the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB). The Bowles award is the state’s highest news industry award. It will be presented at the VAB meeting in Virginia Beach on the weekend of June 12-23 at Virginia Beach.

Phil joined WJMA in 1976 as evening announcer. Over the years he did just about everything at the station: announcing on all shifts, production, sports, sales, and assisting with engineering. In the mid 1980s, Phil left for jobs at other stations (WINA, WCVA/WCUL, and WTKR), but returned in the 1990s as News Director.

Over the years Phil has won awards from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1994 he was honored by the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) with an Edward R. Murrow award for his feature news story “Water Discovered” about renovating a public water fountain on Main Street in Orange. Andy Rooney from CBS presented Phil the award. Phil says he was flattered when Rooney told him “I heard the story. The writing was good.”



Re: interesting obit

Les Myers
 

I saw this but didn't read it until you posted it! Thanks.
 


-----Original Message-----
From: wjma@...
Sent: Fri, 1 Jun 2018 07:22:40 -0400
To: wjma@...
Subject: [WJMA] interesting obit

 

Here’s an interesting obit I read in yesterday’s Washington Post.


Ross
71-86
============



Glenn Snoddy, a Nashville studio engineer who built a pedal that enabled guitarists to create the snarling “fuzz tone,” unleashing sonic distortion possibilities that influenced generations of rock guitarists, died May 21 at his home in Murfreesboro, Tenn. He was 96.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said his daughter Dianne Mayo. 

Whenever you hear guitar distortion on a heavy metal or punk rock record, or the feral guitar of Keith Richards on the Rolling Stones’ 1965 signature hit, (“I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” you’re listening to the legacy of Mr. Snoddy, whose device allowed guitarists to go from clean to dirty picking at the tap of a foot.

The fuzz effect was first heard — by accident — on country singer Marty Robbins’s 1961 record “Don’t Worry.”

During the recording session, guitarist Grady Martin’s six-string bass guitar was being run through a console with a defective transformer. The distorted and almost flatulent sound initially annoyed Mr. Snoddy, and he requested a redo. Martin, producer Don Law and the other musicians convinced him that they had stumbled on something new. 

“No one else used [the fuzz-toned transformer] to my knowledge,” Mr. Snoddy told Vintage Guitar magazine in 2013. “Nancy Sinatra came to town and wanted to use that sound, and I had to tell her people that we didn’t have it anymore because the amplifier completely quit. So I had to get busy and conjure some other way to make it happen.”

Mr. Snoddy took apart the bad transformer and built a foot-operated pedal to duplicate the sound. The Gibson company marketed the pedal, dubbed the Maestro Fuzz-Tone FZ-1. Gibson’s ad campaign improbably said the device would make guitars sound like saxophones and orchestra strings.

When the Stones recorded “Satisfaction,” Richards’s use of Mr. Snoddy’s invention gave the song’s riff an aggression perfectly suited to the song’s confrontational lyrics and helped popularize the band — and the fuzz tone — on both sides of the Atlantic. 

Guitar distortion had been around almost as long as the electric guitar. In the early 1950s, guitarist Willie Johnson played “dirty” guitar with blues singer Howlin’ Wolf by simply turning the volume knob up on his amp and letting the speakers suffer from overheated tubes. The 1951 Jackie Brenston/Ike Turner proto-rock-and-roll hit “Rocket 88” featured guitarist Willie Kizart, who reportedly poked a hole in his amp speaker to get a distorted sound. So did Washington guitarist Link Wray, who used distortion to menacing effect on his 1958 hit “Rumble.” 

“But fuzz was different from those tube-driven sounds,” author William Weir wrote in the Atlantic Monthly. “Transistors boosted and then severely clipped the guitar’s signal, creating a buzzy, not-quite-of-this-world timbre. It sounded kind of synthetic, and far from warm or earthy.”

And for guitarists, another advantage to the pedal was getting a dirty sound reliably without damaging the amplifier’s speakers. Mr. Snoddy’s Maestro fuzz pedal ultimately led to a cottage industry of guitar effect pedals. Later distortion and fuzz devices such as the Mosrite Fuzzrite, the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff and the Ibanez TS808 Tube Screamer have all competed for the fledging hard rock guitarist’s wallet.

Glenn Thomas Snoddy was born in Shelbyville, Tenn., on May 4, 1922. His mother was a homemaker, and his father, who died when Glenn was 12, was a postal carrier and served as the song leader at his local church. Mr. Snoddy studied trombone and piano at an early age but became an engineer after serving as an Army radio technician in the Pacific during World War II. 

He moved to Nashville in the late 1940s, and in the following decade engineered many Grand Ole Opry shows for Nashville radio and television station WSM. In the early 1960s, he became a chief engineer at Owen Bradley’s Quonset Hut studio, where he created one of the first stereo-recording consoles in Nashville and mixed Johnny Cash’s “Ring of Fire” (1963). He also hired a janitor and fledgling songwriter from Texas who pestered studio clients to audition his compositions; his name was Kris Kristofferson.

In 1967, Mr. Snoddy repurposed an old movie complex in East Nashville into Woodland Studios. The studio produced hits including the Charlie Daniels Band’s “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” (1979), the Oak Ridge Boys’ “Elvira” (1981), Kansas’ “Dust In the Wind” (1978) and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s Grammy Award-winning 1972 album “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.” Mr. Snoddy sold his share of the studio in 1980 but continued to run the mixing board for another decade. 

His wife of 69 years, Sara Fite Snoddy, died in 2017. Survivors include three children, Dianne Mayo and James Snoddy, both of Nashville, and Glenda Keller of Brentwood, Tenn.; four grandsons; and a great-granddaughter. 

In recording sessions throughout 1965, the Rolling Stones experimented with “Satisfaction,” but nothing seemed to capture the right tone. Richards tried acoustic guitar, but it fell flat. No one liked his suggestion of a horn section that would “hang hard and long” on the song’s memorable riff. 

According to the London Independent, pianist Ian Stewart, the often uncredited sixth Stone, came up with the ultimate solution. He left the room and returned an hour later, handing Richards a Maestro Fuzz-Tone and said, “Try this!”


interesting obit

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Here’s an interesting obit I read in yesterday’s Washington Post.

Ross
71-86
============



Glenn Snoddy, a Nashville studio engineer who built a pedal that enabled guitarists to create the snarling “fuzz tone,” unleashing sonic distortion possibilities that influenced generations of rock guitarists, died May 21 at his home in Murfreesboro, Tenn. He was 96.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said his daughter Dianne Mayo. 

Whenever you hear guitar distortion on a heavy metal or punk rock record, or the feral guitar of Keith Richards on the Rolling Stones’ 1965 signature hit, (“I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” you’re listening to the legacy of Mr. Snoddy, whose device allowed guitarists to go from clean to dirty picking at the tap of a foot.

The fuzz effect was first heard — by accident — on country singer Marty Robbins’s 1961 record “Don’t Worry.”

During the recording session, guitarist Grady Martin’s six-string bass guitar was being run through a console with a defective transformer. The distorted and almost flatulent sound initially annoyed Mr. Snoddy, and he requested a redo. Martin, producer Don Law and the other musicians convinced him that they had stumbled on something new. 

“No one else used [the fuzz-toned transformer] to my knowledge,” Mr. Snoddy told Vintage Guitar magazine in 2013. “Nancy Sinatra came to town and wanted to use that sound, and I had to tell her people that we didn’t have it anymore because the amplifier completely quit. So I had to get busy and conjure some other way to make it happen.”

Mr. Snoddy took apart the bad transformer and built a foot-operated pedal to duplicate the sound. The Gibson company marketed the pedal, dubbed the Maestro Fuzz-Tone FZ-1. Gibson’s ad campaign improbably said the device would make guitars sound like saxophones and orchestra strings.

When the Stones recorded “Satisfaction,” Richards’s use of Mr. Snoddy’s invention gave the song’s riff an aggression perfectly suited to the song’s confrontational lyrics and helped popularize the band — and the fuzz tone — on both sides of the Atlantic. 

Guitar distortion had been around almost as long as the electric guitar. In the early 1950s, guitarist Willie Johnson played “dirty” guitar with blues singer Howlin’ Wolf by simply turning the volume knob up on his amp and letting the speakers suffer from overheated tubes. The 1951 Jackie Brenston/Ike Turner proto-rock-and-roll hit “Rocket 88” featured guitarist Willie Kizart, who reportedly poked a hole in his amp speaker to get a distorted sound. So did Washington guitarist Link Wray, who used distortion to menacing effect on his 1958 hit “Rumble.” 

“But fuzz was different from those tube-driven sounds,” author William Weir wrote in the Atlantic Monthly. “Transistors boosted and then severely clipped the guitar’s signal, creating a buzzy, not-quite-of-this-world timbre. It sounded kind of synthetic, and far from warm or earthy.”

And for guitarists, another advantage to the pedal was getting a dirty sound reliably without damaging the amplifier’s speakers. Mr. Snoddy’s Maestro fuzz pedal ultimately led to a cottage industry of guitar effect pedals. Later distortion and fuzz devices such as the Mosrite Fuzzrite, the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff and the Ibanez TS808 Tube Screamer have all competed for the fledging hard rock guitarist’s wallet.

Glenn Thomas Snoddy was born in Shelbyville, Tenn., on May 4, 1922. His mother was a homemaker, and his father, who died when Glenn was 12, was a postal carrier and served as the song leader at his local church. Mr. Snoddy studied trombone and piano at an early age but became an engineer after serving as an Army radio technician in the Pacific during World War II. 

He moved to Nashville in the late 1940s, and in the following decade engineered many Grand Ole Opry shows for Nashville radio and television station WSM. In the early 1960s, he became a chief engineer at Owen Bradley’s Quonset Hut studio, where he created one of the first stereo-recording consoles in Nashville and mixed Johnny Cash’s “Ring of Fire” (1963). He also hired a janitor and fledgling songwriter from Texas who pestered studio clients to audition his compositions; his name was Kris Kristofferson.

In 1967, Mr. Snoddy repurposed an old movie complex in East Nashville into Woodland Studios. The studio produced hits including the Charlie Daniels Band’s “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” (1979), the Oak Ridge Boys’ “Elvira” (1981), Kansas’ “Dust In the Wind” (1978) and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s Grammy Award-winning 1972 album “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.” Mr. Snoddy sold his share of the studio in 1980 but continued to run the mixing board for another decade. 

His wife of 69 years, Sara Fite Snoddy, died in 2017. Survivors include three children, Dianne Mayo and James Snoddy, both of Nashville, and Glenda Keller of Brentwood, Tenn.; four grandsons; and a great-granddaughter. 

In recording sessions throughout 1965, the Rolling Stones experimented with “Satisfaction,” but nothing seemed to capture the right tone. Richards tried acoustic guitar, but it fell flat. No one liked his suggestion of a horn section that would “hang hard and long” on the song’s memorable riff. 

According to the London Independent, pianist Ian Stewart, the often uncredited sixth Stone, came up with the ultimate solution. He left the room and returned an hour later, handing Richards a Maestro Fuzz-Tone and said, “Try this!”


Re: more WJMA pictures

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Mark Johnson has had difficulty posting a reply to the group. I’ve heard of this issue with Yahoo Groups before. Maybe it’s time to migrate to groups.io? You would not need to do anything. All the changes are handled on the backend and you'll be subscribed to the new group. Don’t be surprised if you get an email from groups.io

I’ve corrected the caption. It’ll get corrected on the web site the next time I upload pictures.

To help with memory of what was on the control room board (in Mark’s comments below), see these pictures. You might be able to read the labels. I can send anyone copies of the originals. 
http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA places/pages/page_36.html

Now, here’s what Mark wanted to add.

Ross
================

Those are great photographs Ross. That is the WJMA that will always live in my memory.

One minor correction. The out of focus picture of Phil G was taken in Studio B. 

Studio C was a very cozy room adjacent to "B" with a window that visually linked the two studios.

Studio B was quite capacious. To the left side of the Phil G picture there was a fair amount of space between the console and the wall shared with Studio C. To the right of the picture in the back of Studio B there was a cart erasure machine, a splice finder, and some cabinets with blank carts and various oddments of reel-to-reel tape, our sound effects library, some large reels of Bandstand with Colin Rosse from WINA,  as well as other supplies that I can't distinctly recall at the moment. On the wall along the hall there was another window.

And as you say Studio B was our back up control room. There was a switch that instantly moved the on-air studio from the normal CR to B. I used it one night when a fuse blew in the middle of the 10:00PM news-block.

That 8 pot Ampro board was a great machine and Lenny & Gene kept it in top shape. The pots were smooth as butter and the layout was perfect. Each pot had four push button selectors above it so there were 32 different inputs possible. Let's see how many I can dredge up from memory: Two reel-to-reel, two carts (the Spotmaster had three slots, one had its own pot and the other two shared a pot) two microphones, three turntables (we only used two, one was under the cart rack) Va News Net, EBS, Studio A. That's only 12. Of course the main mic was on a dedicated pot I'm sure and likely so were the TTs. But there was some sharing so you had to always remember to reset to the standard arrangement after using one of the alternate feeds. 

The turntables were controlled by the pot keys on the Ampro board. It was a single motion to flip the key and turn the pot up and could be done by a monkey in a snow storm while reading the weather or a PSA over the music intro. That set-up made so much sense I naively assumed that it was standard practice. Then in 1984 when I went to WLSA, much to my consternation I discovered that they still used the ON/OFF switch on the TT itself. Talk about awkward. If you were going to read copy and then start a record you had to remember to get your hand on the switch first or else you would be groping around for it while you were reading. That is one thing I convinced Bob Trent to change when WLSA up-graded its studio in 1985.

Mark Johnson
81-84
..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Apr 23, 2018, at 9:38 PM, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

I recently cam across some old negatives and there were some WJMA pictures from 1982 among them. I’ve posted 12 new images. Start with this page: http://www..wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_138.html and use the “>>” button at the top of the window to move through the pictures. Among the 11 pictures is this one http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20photos/WJMA%20people/pages/page_147.html which is the only one I’ve found that comes close to showing all the news awards that once decorated the office wall.



Ross
71-86


Re: more WJMA pictures--corrected link

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

The last link is wrong. Here’s the right link. http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA places/pages/page_38.html

Ross
..............................................................................
My YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1CiSk09
AHHA Productions YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1GSqtXm



On Apr 23, 2018, at 9:38 PM, Ross Hunter rossgroups@... [WJMA] <WJMA@...> wrote:

 

I recently cam across some old negatives and there were some WJMA pictures from 1982 among them. I’ve posted 12 new images. Start with this page: http://www..wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_138.html and use the “>>” button at the top of the window to move through the pictures. Among the 11 pictures is this one http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20photos/WJMA%20people/pages/page_147.html which is the only one I’ve found that comes close to showing all the news awards that once decorated the office wall.



Ross
71-86


more WJMA pictures

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

I recently cam across some old negatives and there were some WJMA pictures from 1982 among them. I’ve posted 12 new images. Start with this page: http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA photos/WJMA people/pages/page_138.html and use the “>>” button at the top of the window to move through the pictures. Among the 11 pictures is this one http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20photos/WJMA%20people/pages/page_147.html which is the only one I’ve found that comes close to showing all the news awards that once decorated the office wall.


Ross
71-86

Jane Gardner Hall of Fame

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Jane Gardner who once was a WJMA stringer covering Gordonsville Town
Council meetings is now a member of the VCU Virginia Communicators Hall
of Fame. She came to Orange in about 1973 with husband Gary who had
taken a job with WJMA after both graduated from the University of Maryland.

Here's a link to an article which, by the way, does not mention the G'ville Town Council.