Date   
Re: Ryegrass Roller CD arrived

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

In a message dated 3/11/2003 11:45:01 PM Central Standard Time,
rmj142@... writes:




Arch's post scripts were simple with no fanfare or ado. A few moments
out of a hectic day where someone spoke gently and unhurriedly about
one thing or another. They added flavor and good feeling to a classy
radio station.

Yippee...My Ryegrass Rollers CD arrived today.

Just like Arch's postscripts, the Ryegrass Rollers (Audibert and Company)
add flavor and good feeling and belong to a classy group. Don't
walk...run...get this CD. Original. Fun. Poignant and toe tapping. If and
when we have our reunion, I vote for them to play.

(Alan and I are still waiting to hear from the New York State Retirement
System whether they are going to allow him time towards retirement for all
those months he was on duty for the Reserves. Nice timing for them to
renege, with our country calling up all the Reservists. When we know about
retirement, we can return to Virginia and start planning a great big party.)

Love,
Willow (Barbara Potter) Drinkwater

Re: Digest Number 62

Phil Audibert
 

Well said, Mark, and I was going to add the following. Arch would often say
there are numerous sources for news and information, but WJMA was the only
place to bring you "news from around the world and around the corner."

Phil Audibert
76-86

Re: Digest Number 62

Phil Audibert
 

Well said, Mark

The Post Script

Mark Johnson
 

--- In WJMA@..., "R Roberts" <russroberts@e...> wrote:
I agree with my colleagues, the "Postscripts" were
special.
One reason they were special is because they were unusual. I remember
listening to WJMA as a kid and the "post script to today's news" was
something different. Were else (especially in a small market) was
there something like that?

Most stations were strictly play two songs and then 3 spots. Play two
songs, read some news. Yada yada yada.

The large news blocks that we did were unusual and the PS was the
extra nugget buried within, that gave the Noon News a unique flavor.

Some days they were funny, some days sad. Other days interesting and
yes, sometimes not so interesting. But they ended with "take care and
remember we're all out here together" and/or "we'll see you tomorrow
about this same time" and one felt connected to the community via
those words.

Arch's post scripts were simple with no fanfare or ado. A few moments
out of a hectic day where someone spoke gently and unhurriedly about
one thing or another. They added flavor and good feeling to a classy
radio station.

Mark Johnson
81-84

Re: Digest Number 57

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

In a message dated 3/8/2003 5:43:05 PM Central Standard Time,
grandmananer@... writes:


When he paused in his diatribe, his 8-year-old sister looked up at him
and asked with all innocence, "Did you make any new friends today?"
Perhaps we have something in common....with first jobs. Mine was for my Dad
in his Ben Franklin Store in Deep River, CT. I would get off the school bus,
throw my books in the back room and start straightening counters, manning the
cash register, helping customers and doing the weekly payroll...all for fifty
cents an hour. And every day I made a new friend. That's what Dad said
business was all about.

Willow (Barbara Potter) in the late 70's

Re: Molly Hoffman/KCRW?

mollyhhoffman <staff@...>
 

Molly,

Didn't you work at KCRW after leaving WJMA or was it some other
Californina public station?

Ross

Ross,
I worked at KVCR, San Bernardino, California, which wasn't as
interesting a station as KCRW sounds, but it got me to California and
into public radio, and not all of my adventures there were bad.

-- Molly

Re: Question from Linda-Tom Graves

Ross Hunter <xhunter@...>
 

On Saturday, March 8, 2003, at 04:10 PM, Ross Hunter wrote:


So far, Tom is one of the few "Arch Era" employees we have not located.
Another name just came to me - didn't Jay Marks work there at one
point? Maybe in the Alex Formwalt era?

Chap
Jay was on the list for a short time, but has unsbscribed.

Ross

Re: Question from Linda-Tom Graves

Chap Harrison
 

On Saturday, March 8, 2003, at 04:10 PM, Ross Hunter wrote:


So far, Tom is one of the few "Arch Era" employees we have not located.
Another name just came to me - didn't Jay Marks work there at one point? Maybe in the Alex Formwalt era?

Chap

Re: Question from Linda-Tom Graves

Ross Hunter <xhunter@...>
 

This question was included in a message that Linda sent to me. Can anyone
help?

Did anyone else work at WCVH - Tom Graves was there for quite a
while...Anybody know what he's doing now?
Les,

I have written, a couple of times, to the email address that was supposed to be for Tom. I got no response. I subscribed that address when the list began, but it was unsubscribed on-line a couple of days later with no explanation.

I have not heard from Tom in a couple of years. Clint Estes has talked to either Tom or Mary, I can't recall which, in the past year. At last report they were living in Florida.

So far, Tom is one of the few "Arch Era" employees we have not located.

Suggestions?

Ross
71-86

Re: Digest Number 57

Les <grandmananer@...>
 

What a wonderful remembrance, Andy! It reminds me of a former boss I had
whose teenage son found HIS first summer job which was working on a road
crew somewhere in the northern Virginia area. When he came home at the
end of the first day, he was hot, smelly and very tired. As the family
sat around the dinner table, Pete recounted his day with grumbling,
complaints and general disgruntledness about the hot, hard work.

When he paused in his diatribe, his 8-year-old sister looked up at him
and asked with all innocence, "Did you make any new friends today?"

Les Myers

On Sat, 8 Mar 2003 13:29:19 -0500, "Lax, Andrew" <ALax@...> said:
Arch,
Thank you for responding to the inquiry about the Postscripts and for immortalizing, now in cyberspace terms, Albert Fincham. I hadn't thought about Albert in almost 30 years but, hearing about him from you, I have to add to it. After my freshman year in college, I came home without a summer job, except for some part-time work in the WJMA news "department" with Phil Audibert. My father, Ed Lax, was Town Manager of Orange, and I hit him up for a job. He hired me but he was determined that no one would say he had given me some cushy nepotism job. My first employment for the town was riding the garbage truck with Albert and Frank (the driver). And that was the BEST job I was given that summer (you don't want to know what working in the town sewage treatment plant is like in July). In any event, Albert was as much of a character as Arch portrayed him, and more. I think he smoked and chewed on the same nasty cigar all summer and he had a truly predatory eye for "treasu
re
", which he would hang all over the outside of the truck until he
dropped it off at his house, pending one of his yard sales. In the same
conversation, Albert would express his opinions that the 1969 moon
landing was fake and that Hurricane Camille, in the fall of 1969, had
been caused by the moon landing. And, if you lived in Orange in those
days, when those of us who rode the back of the truck emptied out the
trashcans into the truck by hand, Albert knew a LOT about you.
Arch, thanks for the memory.
Andy Lax

-----Original Message-----
From: Arch Harrison [mailto:ah7q@...]
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 8:39 AM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Digest Number 57


==========start reply=====

From: WJMA@...
Reply-To: WJMA@...
Date: 7 Mar 2003 10:21:10 -0000
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Digest Number 57

Arch,

When did you first do a Postscript to the News? I recall that you
included one with _every_ noon news broadcast you did. Where did you
get all that material? How did you have time to prepare one each day?

Ross
-
My recollection is that I did it from Day One. I got much of the material
from the AP wire which included many feature pieces. So now the secret's
out.

Occasionally I wrote my own, often a eulogy for some local citizen who
had
passed away. Not always a prominent one, either.

One of my favorites was for Albert Fincham, who lived across the street
from
WJMA. Albert worked for the Town of Orange on the trash truck. He was
always
on the lookout for saleable salvageable stuff. The truck was festooned
with
things he had picked up along his route. When he had collected enough
he'd
have a yard sale. You'd always know when Albert came into the studio to
place an ad for his sale for he smoked the rankest cigar in Christendom.
Emblematic of his profession, I guess. A memorable guy.

Sources?
Often I'd have several pieces from the wire, in which case I'd ask Ross -
usually in the CR - which he'd like to hear. He'd select, I'd read,
saving
the others for future use. There was never any lack of material.

In other news--
When Molly Hoffman headed west in her pink Corsair she went to a
public
station in San Bernadino CA, not the celebrated KCRW. From there she went
to
help launch a public station in Garden City Kansas, and from there to
Cedar
Falls Iowa. She can tell you the rest.

Thanks for your patience, friends. If this group continues to live, I'll
drop back in. Oh, and thanks, especially, for the thoughts in Digest #52,
3/2/03.

Stay tuned. a r c h

======end reply=========



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WJMA other files are here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/files/
Archive of past messages: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/messages
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Re: Digest Number 57

Lax, Andrew <ALax@...>
 

Arch,
Thank you for responding to the inquiry about the Postscripts and for immortalizing, now in cyberspace terms, Albert Fincham. I hadn't thought about Albert in almost 30 years but, hearing about him from you, I have to add to it. After my freshman year in college, I came home without a summer job, except for some part-time work in the WJMA news "department" with Phil Audibert. My father, Ed Lax, was Town Manager of Orange, and I hit him up for a job. He hired me but he was determined that no one would say he had given me some cushy nepotism job. My first employment for the town was riding the garbage truck with Albert and Frank (the driver). And that was the BEST job I was given that summer (you don't want to know what working in the town sewage treatment plant is like in July). In any event, Albert was as much of a character as Arch portrayed him, and more. I think he smoked and chewed on the same nasty cigar all summer and he had a truly predatory eye for "treasure", which he would hang all over the outside of the truck until he dropped it off at his house, pending one of his yard sales. In the same conversation, Albert would express his opinions that the 1969 moon landing was fake and that Hurricane Camille, in the fall of 1969, had been caused by the moon landing. And, if you lived in Orange in those days, when those of us who rode the back of the truck emptied out the trashcans into the truck by hand, Albert knew a LOT about you.
Arch, thanks for the memory.
Andy Lax

-----Original Message-----
From: Arch Harrison [mailto:ah7q@...]
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 8:39 AM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Digest Number 57


==========start reply=====

From: WJMA@...
Reply-To: WJMA@...
Date: 7 Mar 2003 10:21:10 -0000
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Digest Number 57

Arch,

When did you first do a Postscript to the News? I recall that you
included one with _every_ noon news broadcast you did. Where did you
get all that material? How did you have time to prepare one each day?

Ross
-
My recollection is that I did it from Day One. I got much of the material
from the AP wire which included many feature pieces. So now the secret's
out.

Occasionally I wrote my own, often a eulogy for some local citizen who had
passed away. Not always a prominent one, either.

One of my favorites was for Albert Fincham, who lived across the street from
WJMA. Albert worked for the Town of Orange on the trash truck. He was always
on the lookout for saleable salvageable stuff. The truck was festooned with
things he had picked up along his route. When he had collected enough he'd
have a yard sale. You'd always know when Albert came into the studio to
place an ad for his sale for he smoked the rankest cigar in Christendom.
Emblematic of his profession, I guess. A memorable guy.

Sources?
Often I'd have several pieces from the wire, in which case I'd ask Ross -
usually in the CR - which he'd like to hear. He'd select, I'd read, saving
the others for future use. There was never any lack of material.

In other news--
When Molly Hoffman headed west in her pink Corsair she went to a public
station in San Bernadino CA, not the celebrated KCRW. From there she went to
help launch a public station in Garden City Kansas, and from there to Cedar
Falls Iowa. She can tell you the rest.

Thanks for your patience, friends. If this group continues to live, I'll
drop back in. Oh, and thanks, especially, for the thoughts in Digest #52,
3/2/03.

Stay tuned. a r c h

======end reply=========



........................................................................
WJMA image files are here: http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/lst
WJMA other files are here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/files/
Archive of past messages: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/messages
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Question from Linda

Les <grandmananer@...>
 

This question was included in a message that Linda sent to me. Can anyone
help?

Did anyone else work at WCVH - Tom Graves was there for quite a
while...Anybody know what he's doing now?

Re: Digest Number 57

R Roberts <russroberts@...>
 

Arch,

Some of my favorite "Postscipts" were the ones from the National
Geographic Society. I agree with my colleagues, the "Postscripts" were
special. As Jay wrote of himself, I didn't realize how much I enjoyed
them, either. "You don't know what you've got 'til it's gone." Joni
Mitchell.

Russ Roberts

-----Original Message-----
From: Arch Harrison [mailto:ah7q@...]
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 8:39 AM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Digest Number 57

==========start reply=====

From: WJMA@...
Reply-To: WJMA@...
Date: 7 Mar 2003 10:21:10 -0000
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Digest Number 57

Arch,

When did you first do a Postscript to the News? I recall that you
included one with _every_ noon news broadcast you did. Where did you
get all that material? How did you have time to prepare one each day?

Ross
-
My recollection is that I did it from Day One. I got much of the
material
from the AP wire which included many feature pieces. So now the secret's
out.

Occasionally I wrote my own, often a eulogy for some local citizen who
had
passed away. Not always a prominent one, either.

One of my favorites was for Albert Fincham, who lived across the street
from
WJMA. Albert worked for the Town of Orange on the trash truck. He was
always
on the lookout for saleable salvageable stuff. The truck was festooned
with
things he had picked up along his route. When he had collected enough
he'd
have a yard sale. You'd always know when Albert came into the studio to
place an ad for his sale for he smoked the rankest cigar in Christendom.
Emblematic of his profession, I guess. A memorable guy.

Sources?
Often I'd have several pieces from the wire, in which case I'd ask Ross
-
usually in the CR - which he'd like to hear. He'd select, I'd read,
saving
the others for future use. There was never any lack of material.

In other news--
When Molly Hoffman headed west in her pink Corsair she went to a
public
station in San Bernadino CA, not the celebrated KCRW. From there she
went to
help launch a public station in Garden City Kansas, and from there to
Cedar
Falls Iowa. She can tell you the rest.

Thanks for your patience, friends. If this group continues to live, I'll
drop back in. Oh, and thanks, especially, for the thoughts in Digest
#52,
3/2/03.

Stay tuned. a r c h

======end reply=========



........................................................................
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WJMA other files are here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/files/
Archive of past messages: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/messages
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Re: new audio 3/7/03

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

I've just uploaded a Tom Graves newscast from February 29, 1984. You'll find it in the news folder of the files section. Follow the link below. The newscast was on an aircheck tape that Mark Johnson found.

Except for the year end sport wrap up, this is the only Tom Graves material to surface so far.

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

Re: Digest Number 57

Arch Harrison <ah7q@...>
 

==========start reply=====

From: WJMA@...
Reply-To: WJMA@...
Date: 7 Mar 2003 10:21:10 -0000
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] Digest Number 57

Arch,

When did you first do a Postscript to the News? I recall that you
included one with _every_ noon news broadcast you did. Where did you
get all that material? How did you have time to prepare one each day?

Ross
-
My recollection is that I did it from Day One. I got much of the material
from the AP wire which included many feature pieces. So now the secret's
out.

Occasionally I wrote my own, often a eulogy for some local citizen who had
passed away. Not always a prominent one, either.

One of my favorites was for Albert Fincham, who lived across the street from
WJMA. Albert worked for the Town of Orange on the trash truck. He was always
on the lookout for saleable salvageable stuff. The truck was festooned with
things he had picked up along his route. When he had collected enough he'd
have a yard sale. You'd always know when Albert came into the studio to
place an ad for his sale for he smoked the rankest cigar in Christendom.
Emblematic of his profession, I guess. A memorable guy.

Sources?
Often I'd have several pieces from the wire, in which case I'd ask Ross -
usually in the CR - which he'd like to hear. He'd select, I'd read, saving
the others for future use. There was never any lack of material.

In other news--
When Molly Hoffman headed west in her pink Corsair she went to a public
station in San Bernadino CA, not the celebrated KCRW. From there she went to
help launch a public station in Garden City Kansas, and from there to Cedar
Falls Iowa. She can tell you the rest.

Thanks for your patience, friends. If this group continues to live, I'll
drop back in. Oh, and thanks, especially, for the thoughts in Digest #52,
3/2/03.

Stay tuned. a r c h

======end reply=========

Molly Hoffman/KCRW?

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

Molly,

Didn't you work at KCRW after leaving WJMA or was it some other
Californina public station?

Ross
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Commercials That Rock
How a public radio station in Santa Monica has become the go-to place
for marketers looking to jazz up a brand.
By Rob Walker, March 2003 Issue

Three years ago, Eric Grunbaum, a creative director with
TBWA/Chiat/Day, was pulling an all-nighter and struggling with an ad.
The product was the Infiniti SUV, and Grunbaum needed just the right
kind of pitch music -- an engaging sound that, he says, would feel
"modern, yet mature."

Like many night owls in Los Angeles, he had public radio station KCRW
on in the background. It wasn't long before he heard the perfect
song. Grunbaum called the disc jockey and found out that the tune was
"Delirium," by a Toronto band called Euphoria. A star soundtrack for
an ad was born.

Since Grunbaum made that chance call to KCRW, many ad executives have
followed in his path, forging an unlikely friendship between the
little radio station and Madison Avenue. Already a local legend, KCRW
is quickly establishing itself as an important arbiter of alternative
musical tastes nationwide. Its offbeat sounds dovetail perfectly with
a push by advertisers to reach younger, cash-rich consumers.

When a creative team from Goodby Silverstein & Partners was looking
for a hip sound to back ads for a Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) photo
printer, for example, it relied on the advice of KCRW DJ Tricia
Halloran. Motorola's (MOT) ad people at Ogilvy & Mather consulted
with several DJs as they sought to create the "music vocabulary" for
a series of ads now running on television. In fact, some of the
so-called sound-design firms that advertisers turn to for music have
even brought several of the DJs on staff.

Advertisers have long understood the power of popular music to reach
consumers. Nike (NKE) created a stir in 1987 when it used the
Beatles' "Revolution 1," for instance, and Cadillac has recently
tried to remake its image by licensing Led Zeppelin's "Rock and
Roll." But what works for nostalgic baby boomers doesn't necessarily
work for their kids. "I love Led Zeppelin," says Vinny Picardi of
Deutsch LA, the agency whose Mitsubishi (MTBI) campaigns have turned
unknown songs into hits. "But Mitsubishi isn't yesterday, it's the
future."

And nobody does the future like KCRW. Not that you can see a
scintilla of trendiness in the station's strictly grad-student decor.
The studio, tucked away in the basement of a cafeteria on the campus
of Santa Monica College, seems like just another low-budget place
where alternative music lovers indulge their interest. Music director
Nic Harcourt listens to about 200 CDs a week, searching for the
latest sounds to add to KCRW's collection of some 50,000 titles (the
largest, incidentally, of any public radio station in the country).
He's backed up by part-time DJs, paid in the low five figures. They
also keep up with little-known bands and make their own discoveries
hanging out in clubs.

Those DJs, in turn, are often hired out as music supervisors on ad
accounts. For the current Mitsubishi Outlander commercial, for
example, Deutsch worked with KCRW's Jason Bentley. The 32-year-old DJ
watched the visuals -- fast-paced shots depicting several years in
the life of a young driver from an inside-the-SUV point of view --
and burned 20 songs on a couple of CDs for Picardi's team at Deutsch.

Eventually, one tune stood out: "Breathe," by a band called
Télépopmusik, is slow, almost ethereal. It struck the group as
accessible to 30-something consumers, and the mantra-like lyrics --
"Another day, just breathe" -- reinforced the feeling of an oasis of
calm (the SUV) in a rapidly changing life. Best of all, "Breathe"
hadn't made it to commercial radio, so it still had that underground
vibe.

The other great appeal of this marketing strategy is cost. Using
undiscovered bands is far cheaper than, say, licensing a hit by Sting
or Madonna. Depending on what kind of rights an advertiser wants, and
the status (or desperation) of the musicians, a marketer can license
a song by an underground band for anywhere from $20,000 to $100,000.
The DJs generally also charge a research fee -- perhaps a few
thousand dollars -- as well as a finder's fee if their selection ends
up in the commercial. All told, that's not a lot to create a hit
commercial. It's also not bad for a bunch of DJs working for a
commercial-free radio station.
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

Re: new audio 3/6/03

Jay Kiernan
 

I'd like to offer my own very brief postscript to the subject of Arch's
Postscript to the News.

No matter what was going on at the station (or in the world) on any given
day, when it came time for Arch's Postscript, he would casually saunter
into the studio--usually with only seconds to spare-- and take his position
behind the mic with all the ease and casual grace you'd expect from Mr.
Rogers in HIS Neighborhood.

And while Arch's voice was nothing short of beautiful as it resonated from
the monitor speakers, his demeanor, point of view, subject matter and
delivery style almost always came across as absolutely reasonable,
reassuring, informative and somehow soothing.

When Arch was delivering his Postscript to the News, there was peace and
calm and consistency.

All was right with the world.

I don't think I ever even offered Arch so much as a small compliment for
making that part of each broadcast day such a special occasion. He made it
look so effortless and easy, and perhaps that's why I just took it for
granted.

What a gifted communicator he was and is.

jay kiernan
'76-'79


Arch,

When did you first do a Postscript to the News? I recall that you
included one with _every_ noon news broadcast you did. Where did you
get all that material? How did you have time to prepare one each day?

Ross
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

........................................................................
WJMA image files are here: http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/lst
WJMA other files are here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/files/
Archive of past messages: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WJMA/messages
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Re: new audio 3/6/03

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

I've added a "Postscript to the News" audio cut to the "other" sound files. This is a "so long" to Mark Johnson. Thus far it is the only Postscript audio to have surfaced.

Arch,

When did you first do a Postscript to the News? I recall that you included one with _every_ noon news broadcast you did. Where did you get all that material? How did you have time to prepare one each day?

Ross
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

Re: new audio 3/6/03

lwestby2002@...
 

Amen!

Re: current format and linda's memories

lwestby2002@...
 

Russ, you and I must have worked at WCHV at the same time. At one point I
was
Tom Links secretary, and then he got canned, as so many of US did when Mr.
McClannahan came on the scene. I was his secretary and the receptionist for
a while until he asked me to "bring my little pad into his office to take
some letters",
Well, use your imagination as to what pad I took. Needless to say it was a
crazy time during the "Transition", Did you work for Michael Ludgate? Or
Mr. Floodgate
as he was fondly known to the staff. He was a great guy to work for....I can
thank him for seeing my ability to write copy - I guess it was a compliment
when he said "Why don't you use some of that sarcasim (sp) to write some copy
for me?" So,
I did and wrote copy, and wrote copy, and wrote copy....Those lazy sales
people!
Oh yeah, I guess they are why I kept my job. Duh.

Thanks for John Email address I'm sure he won't remember me from Adam, but I
will
email him just to say hi.

Write with more WCHV (WWWV) memories - Ross, do we have to start our own
website for that?

I still have 2 Jack Russell puppies left guys!!!!!