Date   
Arch Harrison

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

As some of you may have seen today on Facebook, Arch Harrison passed away last night. Reid reports he was asleep, comfortable and peaceful. Reid also wrote "It goes without saying that the WJMA experience was one of the defining aspects of Daddy's life. There was such a sense of fun and family and I don't think there's anything more he could have asked for in life. We're mighty fortunate for having had such an amazing group of folks in all our lives!"

Services are not set yet, but may be in Charlottesville on December 14 with another gather in Orange. I'll pass on the information when it is available.

Ross
71-86

Re: DOCUMENT!--warning

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

Until we hear directly from Russ that this is not a scam or phishing scheme...DON'T click the link or enter any log in information.

Ross
71-86

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Go Green ! Print only as needed.

Re: WJMA call letters

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Alex,

A late follow up to your May 17 suggestion to amend the WJMA Wikipedia page.

I did add the information you found on WKEY previously having the call letters WJMA. Shortly thereafter it was removed by a Wikipedia editor (who may be subscribed to this list) who said the information was not relevant and perhaps confusing. I disagree, but didn't have the time or energy to pursue the issue.

I can't locate at the moment the editors' exact statement, so mine is the best I remember. If I can find it at work and it's different from my memory, I'll post it.

If someone here feels the information should be returned, please edit the WJMA Wikipedia page <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WJMA> and restore the deletion...or write your own version.

Ross
71-86

I believe Wikipedia posts for WJMA could be updated to reflect its original on air date of May 23, 1941 until 1943 when the call letters were renamed WKEY and WJMA was temporarily retired until being reactivated on Sep 10th, 1949. The naming rationale for WJMA in Wikipedia may be corrected as well and an entry in Wikipedia may be made showing the date established for WJMA (it is not listed in any of the years under the subject of "Radio Stations By Year of Establishment").
Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

Re: Ben Hargett

Clint Estes
 

Seems we all are, but I would love to pull the SBC spots.  Some would be fun to hear again.
 
            Clint


-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Wed, Oct 23, 2013 10:21 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
No suggestion is needed. I know I'm behind. ;-)

Ross

Ross, I was not suggesting you were falling behind, just remembering when I last heard some of those Sports Broadcasters Club spots from Mason Insurance.
 
It was great to have a few minutes with Carol when she came to Fluvanna the other day.
 
                                                         Clint
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Wed, Oct 23, 2013 6:57 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
I have fallen way behind on copying old tapes. I need to get back to that project.

Ross


Ross,
    On many of my football tapes you have in the suitcase at your office are many Mason Ins. adds voiced by Mr. Hargett.  I remember him well.
                                                                     Clint
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter <
rossgroups@...>
To: WJMA <
WJMA@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 21, 2013 7:17 am
Subject: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice
of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the
first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the
best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball
broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the
St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<"http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>;

Ross

71-86

Re: Ben Hargett

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

No suggestion is needed. I know I'm behind. ;-)

Ross

Ross, I was not suggesting you were falling behind, just remembering when I last heard some of those Sports Broadcasters Club spots from Mason Insurance.
 
It was great to have a few minutes with Carol when she came to Fluvanna the other day.
 
                                                         Clint
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter
To: WJMA
Sent: Wed, Oct 23, 2013 6:57 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
I have fallen way behind on copying old tapes. I need to get back to that project.

Ross


Ross,
    On many of my football tapes you have in the suitcase at your office are many Mason Ins. adds voiced by Mr. Hargett.  I remember him well.
                                                                     Clint
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter <
rossgroups@...>
To: WJMA <
WJMA@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 21, 2013 7:17 am
Subject: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice
of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the
first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the
best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball
broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the
St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<"http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>;

Ross

71-86

Re: Ben Hargett

Clint Estes
 

Ross, I was not suggesting you were falling behind, just remembering when I last heard some of those Sports Broadcasters Club spots from Mason Insurance. 
 
It was great to have a few minutes with Carol when she came to Fluvanna the other day.
 
                                                         Clint


-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter
To: WJMA
Sent: Wed, Oct 23, 2013 6:57 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
I have fallen way behind on copying old tapes. I need to get back to that project.

Ross


Ross,
    On many of my football tapes you have in the suitcase at your office are many Mason Ins. adds voiced by Mr. Hargett.  I remember him well.
                                                                     Clint
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 21, 2013 7:17 am
Subject: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice
of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the
first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the
best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball
broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the
St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<
"http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>;

Ross
71-86

Re: Ben Hargett

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

I have fallen way behind on copying old tapes. I need to get back to that project.

Ross


Ross,
    On many of my football tapes you have in the suitcase at your office are many Mason Ins. adds voiced by Mr. Hargett.  I remember him well.
                                                                     Clint
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter
To: WJMA
Sent: Mon, Oct 21, 2013 7:17 am
Subject: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice
of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the
first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the
best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball
broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the
St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<
http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>;

Ross
71-86

Re: Ben Hargett

Clint Estes
 

Ross,
    On many of my football tapes you have in the suitcase at your office are many Mason Ins. adds voiced by Mr. Hargett.  I remember him well.
                                                                     Clint

-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter
To: WJMA
Sent: Mon, Oct 21, 2013 7:17 am
Subject: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice
of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the
first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the
best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball
broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the
St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>;

Ross
71-86

Re: Ben Hargett and Arch Harrison

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

Ben Hargett always made me smile, and greeted me with kindness every time our paths crossed.  Will always remember him.  Also, our dear Arch is in hospice at Westminster Canterbury where he has made his home the past few years.  He is in Room 26 second floor, go around back and enter through that door, taking left to elevators.  Reid and Ann were there on Friday night when I stopped by, and his parting words were, "See you in another time, another age."
Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)
 
Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Hunter
To: WJMA
Sent: Mon, Oct 21, 2013 7:17 am
Subject: [WJMA] Ben Hargett

 
Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice
of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the
first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the
best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball
broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the
St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>;

Ross
71-86

Ben Hargett

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Ben Hargett died last Monday. For many, many years he was the voice of a series of Mason Insurance Agency commercials that ran in the first commercial break of the noon news. I'm sorry to say that to the best of my knowledge, none of those commercials still exist.

Ben also helped out on a number of occasions on high school baseball broadcasts. If I recall correctly he was a pitching prospect in the St Louis Cardinals farm system.

He was always an enthusiastic supporter of WJMA.

<http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/search/?t=article&c%5B%5D=obituaries&q=Hargett&d1=&d2=now>

Ross
71-86

Re: Radio ain't dead yet

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

Maybe, but it sure sounds like radio is limping along.

Ross
71-86

Pew study says - guess what... older people ain't on line and don't care to
be... but wait, there's a lot more people who don't want to use Internet
based news and information!

http://www.multichannel.com/distribution/pew-study-24-don%E2%80%99t-use-internet-home/145681

Radio ain't dead yet

Les Myers
 

Pew study says - guess what... older people ain't on line and don't care to
be... but wait, there's a lot more people who don't want to use Internet
based news and information!

http://www.multichannel.com/distribution/pew-study-24-don%E2%80%99t-use-internet-home/145681


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A.M. Radio- news of its death?

Les Myers
 

From the New York Times

A Quest to Save AM Before It’s Lost in the Static

WASHINGTON — Is anyone out there still listening?

The digital age is killing AM radio, an American institution that brought the nation fireside chats, Casey Kasem’s Top 40 and scratchy broadcasts of the World Series. Long surpassed by FM and more recently cast aside by satellite radio and Pandora, AM is now under siege from a new threat: rising interference from smartphones and consumer electronics that reduce many AM stations to little more than static. Its audience has sunk to historical lows.

But at least one man in Washington is tuning in.

Ajit Pai, the lone Republican on the Federal Communications Commission, is on a personal if quixotic quest to save AM. After a little more than a year in the job, he is urging the F.C.C. to undertake an overhaul of AM radio, which he calls “the audible core of our national culture.” He sees AM — largely the realm of local news, sports, conservative talk and religious broadcasters — as vital in emergencies and in rural areas.

“AM radio is localism, it is community,” Mr. Pai, 40, said in an interview.

AM’s longer wavelength means it can be heard at far greater distances and so in crises, he said, “AM radio is always going to be there.” As an example, he cited Fort Yukon, Alaska, where the AM station KZPA broadcasts inquiries about missing hunters and transmits flood alerts during the annual spring ice breakup.

“When the power goes out, when you can’t get a good cell signal, when the Internet goes down, people turn to battery-powered AM radios to get the information they need,” Mr. Pai said.

He admits to feelings of nostalgia. As the son of Indian immigrants growing up in small-town Parsons, Kan., he listened to his high school basketball team win a 1987 championship, he said. “I sat in my bedroom with my radio tuned into KLKC 1540,” he recalled. On boyhood family road trips across the wide Kansas plains, he said, AM radio “was a constant companion.”

But that was then. In 1978, when Mr. Pai was 5, half of all radio listening was on the AM dial. By 2011 AM listenership had fallen to 15 percent, or an average of 3.1 million people, according to a survey by Veronis Suhler Stevenson, a private investment firm. While the number of FM listeners has declined, too, they still averaged 18 million in 2011. (The figures are averages based on measuring listeners every 15 minutes.)

Although five of the top 10 radio stations in the country, as measured by advertising dollars, are AM — among them WCBS in New York and KFI in Los Angeles — the wealth drops rapidly after that. In 1970 AM accounted for 63 percent of broadcast radio stations, but now it accounts for 21 percent, or 4,900 outlets, according to Arbitron. FM accounts for 44 percent, or 10,200 stations. About 35 percent of stations stream content online.

“With the audience goes the advertising revenues,” said Milford Smith, vice president for radio engineering at Greater Media, which owns 21 stations, three of them AM. “That makes for a double whammy.”

Nearly all English-language AM stations have given up playing music, and even a third of the 30 Major League Baseball teams now broadcast on FM. AM, however, remains the realm of conservative talk radio, including roughly 80 percent of the 600 radio stations that carry Rush Limbaugh. Talk radio has helped keep AM alive.

“If it had to rely on music,” said Michael Harrison, editor and publisher of Talkers magazine, “AM radio would be dead.”

But why try to salvage AM? Critics say its decline is simply natural selection at work, and many now support converting the frequency for use by other wireless technologies. A big sign of AM’s weakness is that one hope for many of its stations may be channeling their broadcasts onto FM.

Not so fast, said Mr. Pai, who has been pushing the F.C.C.’s interim chairwoman, Mignon Clyburn, to put the revitalization of AM high on the agency’s agenda.

“I’m obviously bullish on next-generation technology,” Mr. Pai said. “But I certainly think there continues to be a place for broadcasting and for AM radio.”

Mr. Pai said he was not promoting AM to advance conservative talk radio, but part of his prescription treads a traditional Republican path. He wants to eliminate outdated regulations, for example, like one that requires AM stations to prove that any new equipment decreases interference with other stations, a requirement that is expensive, cumbersome and difficult to meet.

Mr. Pai also wants to examine a relatively new technology known as HD Radio, which has allowed some stations to transmit a digital signal along with their usual analog wave, damping static. (HD Radio is a brand name; it does not stand for high definition, as in HDTV.) But some critics still fault the F.C.C. for allowing too many broadcasters to crowd into a relatively narrow AM band of airwaves.

In the longer term, Mr. Pai said, the F.C.C. could mandate that all AM stations convert to digital transmission to reduce interference. Such a conversion, however, would cost consumers, who would have to replace the hundreds of millions of AM radios that do not capture digital transmissions.

Finally, Mr. Pai wants the F.C.C. to consider what are called FM translators, which send duplicate AM broadcasts over FM airwaves and help to reduce interference. In 2009, the F.C.C. granted permission to AM stations to use such translators.

“Our business has improved rather dramatically” since the conversion to dual bands, said Bud Walters, owner of Cromwell Group, which operates 23 stations in four states, six of them on the AM band and five of which share translators.

The F.C.C. has said it is behind Mr. Pai, although it is a long way from committing to the overhaul he envisions. In August the commission approved a measure requiring the builders of any new radio tower to compensate an AM station if the tower interferes with the station’s broadcast.

Some station owners want more. David Honig, the president of the Minority Media and Telecommunications Council, said that the F.C.C. had before it 37 proposals that would expand opportunities for minority ownership but do not require giving minority-owned radio groups special rights. Two-thirds of minority-owned radio stations broadcast on AM.

The reality, however, is that even if the F.C.C. reduces regulation and provides compensation for AM stations, it cannot repeal the laws of physics.

Nearly every recently manufactured electronic consumer product — not just proliferating smartphones but televisions, home air-conditioning systems, refrigerators, computers and even energy-saving fluorescent light bulbs — emits radio signals that can interfere with AM broadcasts.

The economic boom of the 1980s and 1990s also contributed to the problem with an increase in the construction of tall buildings in suburban areas and beyond, blocking AM signals. Another issue is that the F.C.C. requires most stations to turn off or greatly reduce signals at night, a rule aimed at keeping high-powered AM stations from interfering with smaller local ones.

(The rule, which hardly engenders loyalty among listeners, was adopted because of the way radio waves in the AM frequency travel. Once the sun goes down, AM signals bounce off the ionosphere and reflect back down to earth hundreds of miles from where they originated. That is why listeners of WRDN-AM (1430) in Durand, Wis., for example, on some nights discover they are inadvertently tuned in to a broadcast from St. Louis.)

Mr. Pai said that unless the problems with AM radio were fixed, people would keep fleeing. “There are plenty of other options,” he said. “They will switch the dial to something else.”


 


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new photo comment

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

Over the weekend I got a Facebook "friend" request from Dixie Cassel who said she was an avid WJMA listener from 1956 to 1969.

I see now that she has added a comment to a picture in the "WJMA People" gallery. <http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20photos/WJMA%20people/pages/page_63.html>

FWIW, there is a WJMA page on Facebook. As I come across WJMA alums on Facebook, I've taken the liberty of adding you to the Facebook page. If I've missed you, feel free to join. I doubt there will be anything on the Facebook page that has not made a first appearance here.

Chapter 3 of the "Now This..." documentary is now posted on YouTube. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p07T5_1JLd0&list=TLlVMyYMc0qg0>

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research-mailing services for Central Virginia
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
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USA
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Go Green ! Print only as needed.

Re: Swap Shop memories

Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...>
 

I've included a newly found Les Myers photo in the WJMA people gallery. You can see it here: <http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20photos/WJMA%20people/pages/page_90.html>

Ross
71-86

Re: Swap Shop memories

Mark Johnson
 

Ah, I'm glad someone besides me remembers a box of index cards!

Mark Johnson
81-84
--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 7/23/13, Alex Formwalt <formwalt@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories
To: WJMA@...
Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 5:59 PM
















 






















Mark - The box container cards for Swap Shop were still in
use as late as 1969 from my recollections. Pat Watson
transcribed the word descriptions from letters received in
the mail - one card per customer. Many of the letters
received were hand written and difficult to read - even the
telephone numbers were a challenge. There had been a few
interesting announcer interpretations from hand written
letters so Pat took on the task to fix that. The result was
a smoother running, more professional sounding show. Either
Pat or the duty announcer used the notepad to transcribe on
air calls and the announcer used the box card announcements
to fill airtime as needed. Perhaps the card system was not
used by everyone. Or did we have enough calls that we
stopped accepting letters? Seems there were several changes
in studio hardware, procedures, etc that happened in early
70's. Sent via BlackBerry by
AT&TFrom: Mark Johnson
<rmj142@...>
Sender: WJMA@...
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2013 14:17:03 -0700
(PDT)To:
<WJMA@...>ReplyTo:
WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop
memories

 






Well I'm about ten years past the point of
thinking my memory is infallible. I may be conflating two
different things here, but I definitely remember a little
green box filled with Swap Shop related index cards.
Didn't we sell classifieds on Swap Shop? Maybe the box
held paid adverts.



Mark Johnson

81-84

--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 7/23/13, Clestes@...
<Clestes@...>
wrote:



Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

To: WJMA@...

Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 1:36 PM



Wow Mark the green index box sounds familiar, but

I remember a spiral notebook with dates at the top of the

page that when I worked Sunday or Saturdays I would look

through to get the information needed.  The only thing

I had to overcome was being able to read the

handwriting in the notebook.





 





                                                      

Clint

Re: Swap Shop memories

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

I do remember having come down fresh from Western NY not understanding someone had a powersaw for sale.  Wrote down "parasol". 
Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)
 
Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Al Gaige <algaige@...>
To: WJMA@...
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 11:39 pm
Subject: RE: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
I did not enjoy hosting Swap Shop when I was there in the late 80's, early 90's...had one lady say she had a "Sh*t load of stuff"...did any else have one of Carlin's words get on the air?

al gaige


To: WJMA@...
From: willowdrinkwater@...
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2013 23:29:53 -0400
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 

I produced the Swap Shop in 1978 and loved every minute of it.  I even got a sewing machine for 10 bales of hay, and a pool table for the same.
Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)
 
Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Clestes <Clestes@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 5:21 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
Wow Mark the green index box sounds familiar, but I remember a spiral notebook with dates at the top of the page that when I worked Sunday or Saturdays I would look through to get the information needed.  The only thing I had to overcome was being able to read the handwriting in the notebook.
 
                                                       Clint


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Johnson <rmj142@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 10:44 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
In casting my mind back three decades and more I recall that the Swap Shop producer wrote each item down on an index card with the seller's phone number. The cards were kept in a little green tin box for a few days so people could call and ask for the number of an item. In the evenings this duty fell to the on air announcer. Usually the process went smoothly but occasionally hearsay would result in a caller inquiring about an item that didn't exist or was substantially different than they thought or had been told.

Mark Johnson
81-84
















Re: Swap Shop memories

Al Gaige
 

I did not enjoy hosting Swap Shop when I was there in the late 80's, early 90's...had one lady say she had a "Sh*t load of stuff"...did any else have one of Carlin's words get on the air?

al gaige


To: WJMA@...
From: willowdrinkwater@...
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2013 23:29:53 -0400
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 

I produced the Swap Shop in 1978 and loved every minute of it.  I even got a sewing machine for 10 bales of hay, and a pool table for the same.
Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)
 
Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Clestes
To: WJMA
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 5:21 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
Wow Mark the green index box sounds familiar, but I remember a spiral notebook with dates at the top of the page that when I worked Sunday or Saturdays I would look through to get the information needed.  The only thing I had to overcome was being able to read the handwriting in the notebook.
 
                                                       Clint


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Johnson <rmj142@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 10:44 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
In casting my mind back three decades and more I recall that the Swap Shop producer wrote each item down on an index card with the seller's phone number. The cards were kept in a little green tin box for a few days so people could call and ask for the number of an item. In the evenings this duty fell to the on air announcer. Usually the process went smoothly but occasionally hearsay would result in a caller inquiring about an item that didn't exist or was substantially different than they thought or had been told.

Mark Johnson
81-84
















Re: Swap Shop memories

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

I produced the Swap Shop in 1978 and loved every minute of it.  I even got a sewing machine for 10 bales of hay, and a pool table for the same.
Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)
 
Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Clestes
To: WJMA
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 5:21 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
Wow Mark the green index box sounds familiar, but I remember a spiral notebook with dates at the top of the page that when I worked Sunday or Saturdays I would look through to get the information needed.  The only thing I had to overcome was being able to read the handwriting in the notebook.
 
                                                       Clint


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Johnson <rmj142@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 10:44 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 
In casting my mind back three decades and more I recall that the Swap Shop producer wrote each item down on an index card with the seller's phone number. The cards were kept in a little green tin box for a few days so people could call and ask for the number of an item. In the evenings this duty fell to the on air announcer. Usually the process went smoothly but occasionally hearsay would result in a caller inquiring about an item that didn't exist or was substantially different than they thought or had been told.

Mark Johnson
81-84















Re: Swap Shop memories

Alex Formwalt
 

Mark - The box container cards for Swap Shop were still in use as late as 1969 from my recollections. Pat Watson transcribed the word descriptions from letters received in the mail - one card per customer. Many of the letters received were hand written and difficult to read - even the telephone numbers were a challenge. There had been a few interesting announcer interpretations from hand written letters so Pat took on the task to fix that. The result was a smoother running, more professional sounding show. Either Pat or the duty announcer used the notepad to transcribe on air calls and the announcer used the box card announcements to fill airtime as needed. Perhaps the card system was not used by everyone. Or did we have enough calls that we stopped accepting letters? Seems there were several changes in studio hardware, procedures, etc that happened in early 70's.
Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

From: Mark Johnson <rmj142@...>
Sender: WJMA@...
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2013 14:17:03 -0700 (PDT)
To: <WJMA@...>
ReplyTo: WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories

 

Well I'm about ten years past the point of thinking my memory is infallible. I may be conflating two different things here, but I definitely remember a little green box filled with Swap Shop related index cards. Didn't we sell classifieds on Swap Shop? Maybe the box held paid adverts.

Mark Johnson
81-84
--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 7/23/13, Clestes@... <Clestes@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [WJMA] Swap Shop memories
To: WJMA@...
Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 1:36 PM

Wow Mark the green index box sounds familiar, but
I remember a spiral notebook with dates at the top of the
page that when I worked Sunday or Saturdays I would look
through to get the information needed.  The only thing
I had to overcome was being able to read the
handwriting in the notebook.


 


                                                      
Clint