Date   
Re: Ode to WMAL

Clint Estes
 

What a wonderful documentary! I know things change, but at it's core people are still the same. I wonder if it could succeed?????

Clint

-----Original Message-----
From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 24, 2012 4:09 pm
Subject: [WJMA] Ode to WMAL




I happened across a documentary on the glory days of WMAL.
<https://vimeo.com/47881352> There are some great memories there.

I wonder if such a station could succeed today. It's interesting that
Andy Ockershausen says there are three things you need for a
successful station: number 1 and most important: programming, then
promotion and finally sales. "Sales did not drive our station,
programming did...if you did all three properly, you made a lot of
money."

Ross
71-86
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Ode to WMAL

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

I happened across a documentary on the glory days of WMAL. <https://vimeo.com/47881352> There are some great memories there.

I wonder if such a station could succeed today. It's interesting that Andy Ockershausen says there are three things you need for a successful station: number 1 and most important: programming, then promotion and finally sales. "Sales did not drive our station, programming did...if you did all three properly, you made a lot of money."

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research-mailing services for Central Virginia
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
USA
1-540-672-2327 1-800-328-2588 fax: 1-540-672-0296
http://www.dmrmail.com
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Re: Ode to the Teletype

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

I remember that machine when I was working at WJMA with Arch, Phil Audibert, Mitzi Green, Dudley Littlehales,
Phil Goodwin, Russ Roberts,Clint Estes, Mary, Pat and Patricia McArver! What good times they were, and at the time, I
knew it! Is it still in use?


Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)

Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment

-----Original Message-----
From: Clestes <Clestes@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Sun, Aug 12, 2012 9:17 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ode to the Teletype






To bad you are not old just yetMJ, just a little cranky.
Keep Smiling,
Clint

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Johnson <rmj142@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 10, 2012 4:22 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ode to the Teletype

I watched that YouTube video and when he took the off cover was amazed at how many pieces were moving synchronously. It was an engineering and design marvel. Do you suppose 50 years from now anyone will take the cover off an IPOD and be amazed at what they see inside?

I'm feeling old and cranky.

MJ
81-84

--- On Fri, 8/10/12, Dominion Market Research <ross@...> wrote:

From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>

While this model was not the same as WJMA's it sure does look and

sound right. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GV_IhxQpvw>

Switch to: Text-Only, Daily Digest • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use

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Re: Ode to the Teletype

Clint Estes
 

To bad you are not old just yetMJ, just a little cranky.
Keep Smiling,
Clint

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Johnson <rmj142@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 10, 2012 4:22 pm
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Ode to the Teletype




I watched that YouTube video and when he took the off cover was amazed at how many pieces were moving synchronously. It was an engineering and design marvel. Do you suppose 50 years from now anyone will take the cover off an IPOD and be amazed at what they see inside?

I'm feeling old and cranky.

MJ
81-84

--- On Fri, 8/10/12, Dominion Market Research <ross@...> wrote:

From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>

While this model was not the same as WJMA's it sure does look and

sound right. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GV_IhxQpvw>

Switch to: Text-Only, Daily Digest • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use

.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Ode to the Teletype

Mark Johnson
 

I watched that YouTube video and when he took the off cover was amazed at how many pieces were moving synchronously.  It was an engineering and design marvel. Do you suppose 50 years from now anyone will take the cover off an IPOD and be amazed at what they see inside?

I'm feeling old and cranky.

MJ
81-84

--- On Fri, 8/10/12, Dominion Market Research <ross@...> wrote:

From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>



While this model was not the same as WJMA's it sure does look and

sound right. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GV_IhxQpvw>




Switch to: Text-Only, Daily Digest • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use



















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Re: Ode to the Teletype

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

You could usually tell by the sound as you came in the front door in
the morning, if the teletype had messed up overnight. Sometimes it
was a ribbon problem, sometimes it was a paper problem. After
clearing the jam, you'd need to see what was missing and call AP in
Richmond to get a refeed of important items for the morning.

I recall the AP teletype repair guys were always more than happy to
teach anyone interested the basics of maintenance and repair. That
could sometimes save them a trip from Richmond or buy them some
hours. I also recall that Arch bought or otherwise acquired a backup
machine that the AP guys would service because they knew it would be
to their benefit.

I'm sure the machine that was there in 1971 was not the same one that
was there in the early 80s, but to me they all looked the same. After
doing some Google searching, I'd guess we had a Model 15 teletype.
Les, there's audio that sounds right to me on this page.
<http://www.modestoradiomuseum.org/teletype%20news.html>

While this model was not the same as WJMA's it sure does look and
sound right. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GV_IhxQpvw>

I recall that John Lee got the old machine from Digby Solomon when
AP, or was it UPI at the time, changed over to dot matrix type
printers.

Finally, here's a WJMA cast of characters talking about one time when
the teletype messed up. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpcbOqS_BqE>

Ross
71-86

Ah yes. ding ding ding ding ding!

Usually when all the bells went off you would rush to the machine to
find either that it was just a test, or an unexciting AP
announcement correcting a typo in an earlier piece or maybe a
schedule change.

I recall twice where a bunch of ding dings actually meant big news.
In January 1982 when Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the 14th
Street Bridge and again almost exactly four years later when
Challenger exploded.

The teletype at WJMA attained its senior status long before I ever
saw it. Does anyone know just how old it was? When I went down to
WLSA in the Spring of 1984 I was taken aback by the new modern
design. It looked and sounded like a glorified electric typewriter.
Not nearly as much character as the one I was used to.

Mark Johnson
81-84

--- On Thu, 8/9/12, Dominion Market Research
<<mailto:ross%40dmrmail.com>ross@...> wrote:

From: Dominion Market Research <<mailto:ross%40dmrmail.com>ross@...>
Subject: [WJMA] Ode to the Teletype
To: <mailto:WJMA%40yahoogroups.com>WJMA@...
Date: Thursday, August 9, 2012, 3:23 PM



Here's a link to a nice piece on WVTF about teletype machines. Remember them?

<<http://www.wvtf.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1931:ode-to-the-teletype&catid=52:essays-and-commentary&Itemid=150>http://www.wvtf.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1931:ode-to-the-teletype&catid=52:essays-and-commentary&Itemid=150>

Ross

71-86

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Re: Ode to the Teletype

Mark Johnson
 

Ah yes. ding ding ding ding ding!

Usually when all the bells went off you would rush to the machine to find either that it was just a test, or an unexciting AP announcement correcting a typo in an earlier piece or maybe a schedule change.

I recall twice where a bunch of ding dings actually meant big news. In January 1982 when Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the 14th Street Bridge and again almost exactly four years later when Challenger exploded.

The teletype at WJMA attained its senior status long before I ever saw it. Does anyone know just how old it was? When I went down to WLSA in the Spring of 1984 I was taken aback by the new modern design. It looked and sounded like a glorified electric typewriter. Not nearly as much character as the one I was used to.

Mark Johnson
81-84

--- On Thu, 8/9/12, Dominion Market Research <ross@...> wrote:

From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
Subject: [WJMA] Ode to the Teletype
To: WJMA@...
Date: Thursday, August 9, 2012, 3:23 PM
















 









Here's a link to a nice piece on WVTF about teletype machines. Remember them?



<http://www.wvtf.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1931:ode-to-the-teletype&catid=52:essays-and-commentary&Itemid=150>



Ross

71-86

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Ode to the Teletype

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

Here's a link to a nice piece on WVTF about teletype machines. Remember them?

<http://www.wvtf.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1931:ode-to-the-teletype&catid=52:essays-and-commentary&Itemid=150>

Ross
71-86
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PO Box 791
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Re: Dead Air alert

Barbara Potter-Drinkwater
 

That will be something to see! Phil and John at Lightwell. WOW!


Barbara (Willow) Drinkwater
11232 Cedar Hill Road
Gordonsville, VA 22942
434-249-6892 (cell)
540-832-3368 (home)

Believer in people passionately playing in partnership moment by moment by moment

-----Original Message-----
From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Fri, Jun 29, 2012 11:46 am
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Dead Air alert





While the air may be dear, the subject line should be "Dead Air alert".

Ross
71-86


This Saturday (6/30) John Lee and Phil Audibert get together again to
play as Dead Air. The venue is the Light Well on Main Street in
Orange.

They haven't played together for at least 10 years. They'll perform
from 9 to 11.

Ross
71-86

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Re: Dead Air alert

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

While the air may be dear, the subject line should be "Dead Air alert".

Ross
71-86


This Saturday (6/30) John Lee and Phil Audibert get together again to
play as Dead Air. The venue is the Light Well on Main Street in
Orange.

They haven't played together for at least 10 years. They'll perform
from 9 to 11.

Ross
71-86

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Dominion Market Research-mailing services for Central Virginia
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PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
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1-540-672-2327 1-800-328-2588 fax: 1-540-672-0296
<http://www.dmrmail.com>http://www.dmrmail.com
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Dear Air alert

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

This Saturday (6/30) John Lee and Phil Audibert get together again to
play as Dead Air. The venue is the Light Well on Main Street in
Orange.

They haven't played together for at least 10 years. They'll perform
from 9 to 11.

Ross
71-86

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PO Box 791
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Re: 40 years ago

Lax, Andrew <ALax@...>
 

Ross,

Thanks for this. I got to hear a snippet of my dad's voice in the news report. Hope all is well with you.

Andy
[cid:image001.png@...]



Andrew W. Lax

Shareholder

alax@...<mailto:alax@...>


McNair Law Firm, P.A.

Charlotte Office Two Wells Fargo Center, 301 South Tryon Street | Suite 1615 | Charlotte, NC 28282

704 347 1170 Main | 704 347 4467 Fax


VCard <http://ecard.mcnair.net/ContactCards/ALax.vcf> | Bio URL <http://www.mcnair.net/Professionals/alax> | Web site <http://www.mcnair.net>








From: WJMA@... [mailto:WJMA@...] On Behalf Of Dominion Market Research
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2012 3:21 PM
To: WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] 40 years ago



On June 22, 1972, Virginia was struggling to recover from Hurricane
Agnes. One of the oldest surviving recordings from WJMA is the 5
o'clock report from Thursday June 22, 1972 and a warp up of hurricane
news. The linked story is an edited version of a longer report.

As I recall, Alex Formwalt was holding down the afternoon shift and I
was standing by for the Evening Show when I was drafted to read the
hurricane news. The number of local voices in the story is
impressive in this pre-news department effort. It would be a few more
years before Chet Burgess would come on board to get a serious news
operation started.
<http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20audio/WJMA%20news/Hurricane%20Agnes.mp3>

There's a lot more on Agnes on the internet.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Agnes>

Ross
71-86
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40 years ago

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

On June 22, 1972, Virginia was struggling to recover from Hurricane Agnes. One of the oldest surviving recordings from WJMA is the 5 o'clock report from Thursday June 22, 1972 and a warp up of hurricane news. The linked story is an edited version of a longer report.

As I recall, Alex Formwalt was holding down the afternoon shift and I was standing by for the Evening Show when I was drafted to read the hurricane news. The number of local voices in the story is impressive in this pre-news department effort. It would be a few more years before Chet Burgess would come on board to get a serious news operation started. <http://www.wjma.radiohistory.net/WJMA%20audio/WJMA%20news/Hurricane%20Agnes.mp3>

There's a lot more on Agnes on the internet. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Agnes>

Ross
71-86
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Re: Hal Lockhard

Clint Estes
 

Hey Phil Goodwin how many years did you interview the Louisa Rebel coach?

Clint

-----Original Message-----
From: Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
To: WJMA <WJMA@...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 7, 2012 3:56 pm
Subject: [WJMA] Hal Lockhard




Remember Hal Lockhart, football coach at Louisa County High School?
For the past 24 year's he's been the head coach of the Viriginia
Ravens football team. Here's a link to a Times Dispatch story on his
retirement.
<http://www2.timesdispatch.com/sports/2012/mar/13/tdsport02-lockhart-steps-down-after-24-seasons-as--ar-1760534/>

Ross
71-86
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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Hal Lockhard

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

Remember Hal Lockhart, football coach at Louisa County High School? For the past 24 year's he's been the head coach of the Viriginia Ravens football team. Here's a link to a Times Dispatch story on his retirement.
<http://www2.timesdispatch.com/sports/2012/mar/13/tdsport02-lockhart-steps-down-after-24-seasons-as--ar-1760534/>

Ross
71-86
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new worlds in broadcasting

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

An interesting article on the state radio around the world.
<<http://www.fmqb.com/article.asp?id=2467505>http://www.fmqb.com/article.asp?id=2467505>

Ross
71-86
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Hank Burruss

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

Yesterday I learned of the passing of Hank Burruss. For many years Hank was the UPS delivery guy for WJMA. He and Pat would often talk football and their love of the Dallas Cowboys. At one point, with permission of his UPS supervisors, we convinced him to go on the air on Friday mornings to talk a bit of football.

There's just a basic obituary as of Wednesday morning. It's on the Daily Progress site. <http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dailyprogress/obituary.aspx?n=hank-l-burruss&pid=157852970>

Ross
71-86
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Digby Solomon makes the news

Dominion Market Research <ross@...>
 

http://www.dailypress.com/news/breaking/dp-nws-printing-0502-20120501,0,3004240.story
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Dick Clark

Les Myers
 

You probably saw this or versions of it. I thought that it reflected the way many of us got into radio.

The New York Times

April 18, 2012
TV Host and Icon of New Year’s Eve Dies at 82
By BRUCE WEBER

Dick Clark, the perpetually youthful-looking television host whose long-running daytime song-and-dance fest, “American Bandstand,” did as much as anyone or anything to advance the influence of teenagers and rock ’n’ roll on American culture, died on Wednesday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 82.

A spokesman, Paul Shefrin, said Mr. Clark had a heart attack Wednesday morning at Saint John’s Health Center, where he had gone the day before for an outpatient procedure.

Mr. Clark had a well-publicized stroke in December 2004, shortly before he was to appear on the annual televised New Year’s Eve party he had produced and hosted every year since 1973. He returned a year later, and although he spoke haltingly, he continued to make brief appearances on the show, including the one this past New Year’s Eve.

With the boyish good looks of a bound-for-success junior executive and a ubiquitous on-camera presence, Mr. Clark was among the most recognizable faces in the world, even if what he was most famous for — spinning records and jabbering with teenagers — was on the insubstantial side. In addition to “American Bandstand” and “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve,” he hosted innumerable awards shows, comedy specials, series based on TV outtakes and the game show $10,000 Pyramid” (which lasted long enough to see the stakes ratcheted up to $100,000). He also made guest appearances on dramatic and comedy series, usually playing himself.

But he was as much a businessman as a television personality — “I get enormous pleasure and excitement sitting in on conferences with accountants, tax experts and lawyers,” he said in an interview with The New York Times in 1961 — and he was especially deft at packaging entertainment products for the small screen.

Starting in the 1960s, Mr. Clark built an entertainment empire on the shoulders of “Bandstand,” producing other music shows like “Where the Action Is” and “It’s Happening” and eventually expanding into game shows, awards shows, comedy specials and series, talk shows, children’s programming, reality programming, and movies. His umbrella company, Dick Clark Productions, has produced thousands of hours of television; it also has a licensing arm and has owned or operated restaurants and theaters like the Dick Clark American Bandstand Theater in Branson, Mo.

Over half a century, Mr. Clark made millions as a producer or executive producer, shepherding projects onto the airwaves that even he acknowledged were more diverting than ennobling: awards shows like the Golden Globes, the Academy of Country Music Awards and the American Music Awards; “TV’s Bloopers & Practical Jokes” and other omnibus shows featuring collections of clips; and television-movie biographies and dramas, in either uplifting or lurid mode, that targeted devotees of camp, kitsch or B-list celebrities. He wasn’t high-minded about his work.

“I’ve always dealt with light, frivolous things that didn’t really count; I’m not ashamed of that,” he said during a 1999 interview for the Archive of American Television. “There’s no redeeming cultural value whatsoever to ‘Bloopers,’ but it’s been on for 20 years.” He added: “It’s a piece of fluff. I’ve been a fluffmeister for a long time.”

But none of it would have been possible without “American Bandstand,” a show that earned immediate popularity and had astonishing longevity. It was broadcast nationally (and for several years daily) from 1957 to 1989, and the list of well-known performers who were seen on it (many of them lip-synching their recently recorded hits) spanned generations: from Ritchie Valens to Luther Vandross; from the Monkees to Madonna; from Little Anthony and the Imperials to Los Lobos; from Dusty Springfield to Buffalo Springfield to Rick Springfield. Mr. Clark was around for it all.

The right man at the right time, Mr. Clark was a radio personality in Philadelphia in 1956 when he stepped into the role of host of what was then a local television show called “Bandstand” after the regular host was arrested for drunken driving and fired. By the following October, the show was being broadcast on ABC nationwide with a new name, “American Bandstand,” and for the next several years it was seen every weekday afternoon by as many as 20 million viewers, most of whom were undoubtedly not yet out of high school and tuned in to watch a few dozen of their peers dance chastely to the latest recordings of pop hits, showing off new steps like the twist, the pony and the Watusi, and rating the new records in brief interviews.

“It’s got a good beat and you can dance to it” became a catchphrase.

Handsome and glib, Dick Clark was their music-savvy older brother, and from that position of authority he presided, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, over a grass-roots revolution in American culture. Not only was “American Bandstand” the first show to make use of the new technology, television, to spread the gospel of rock ’n’ roll, in its early years introducing a national audience to teen idols like Fabian and Connie Francis, first-generation rockers like Bill Haley and Jerry Lee Lewis, and singing ensembles like the Everly Brothers, but it also helped persuade broadcasters and advertisers of the power of teenagers to steer popular taste.

“At that moment in time, the world realized that kids might rule the world,” Mr. Clark once said. “They had their own music, their own fashion, their own money.”

By early 1958, “American Bandstand” was a big enough hit that delighted network executives installed a new show in a concert format in its Saturday night lineup, “The Dick Clark Show,” and in June of that year sent it on the road, broadcasting from a number of cities. In October, when “the Dick Clark Show” originated from Atlanta, both black and white teenagers were in the audience — it amounted to one of the first racially integrated rock concerts — and, with National Guard troops present, it weathered threats from the Ku Klux Klan.

The nighttime “Dick Clark Show” lasted only until 1960, and “American Bandstand” reduced its schedule from every weekday to every Saturday afternoon in 1963, but Mr. Clark was nonetheless one of the biggest success stories in the early days of television.

In spite of his success, though, Mr. Clark, who never hid his desire for wealth, wasn’t getting rich as a network employee, and he had begun investing shrewdly and voluminously in the businesses that “American Bandstand” supported: talent management, music publishing, record distribution and merchandising, among others. But his bank account and his clean-cut image were damaged temporarily when Congress convened hearings into payola, the record company practice of bribing disc jockeys to play their records on the air.

In late 1959, with the hearings pending, ABC insisted that Mr. Clark divest himself of all his record-related businesses, which he did. He was called to testify before the House Special Subcommittee on Legislative Oversight in April 1960, and though he denied ever taking money to play records, he acknowledged a number of acts that exposed what many Congressmen deemed the cozier than ethical relationship that disc jockeys in general, and Mr. Clark in particular, had with the music industry.

For an investment of $125 in one record company, for example, Mr. Clark received, over two years, $31,700 in salary and stock profit. He admitted that some songs and records might have been given to his publishing and distribution companies because of his affiliation with “American Bandstand.” He also acknowledged accepting a ring and a fur stole from a record manufacturer.

Mr. Clark was never convicted of a crime, but he said that having to comply with the network’s divestiture request cost him millions.

“I never took any money to play records,” Mr. Clark said in his 1999 Archive of American Television interview. “I made money other ways. Horizontally, vertically, every which way you can think of, I made money from that show.”

Richard Wagstaff Clark was born on Nov. 30, 1929, in Bronxville, N.Y., and grew up in nearby Mount Vernon. His father, Richard Augustus Clark, was a salesman who commuted to New York City until he was hired to manage a radio station in Utica, N.Y. Young Richard’s older brother, Bradley, was killed in World War II.

As a boy he listened often to the radio, and at 13 he went to see a live radio broadcast starring Jimmy Durante and Garry Moore. From then on, he wanted to be in broadcasting. His first job, at 17, was in the mailroom of his father’s station. He often said he learned the most important lesson of his career from listening to Arthur Godfrey.

“I emulated him,” Mr. Clark said. “I loved him, I adored him, because he had the ability to communicate to one person who was listening or watching. Most people would say, in a stentorian voice, ‘Good evening, everyone.’ Everyone? Godfrey knew there was only one person listening at a time.”

Mr. Clark studied business administration at Syracuse University, where he was a disc jockey on the student radio station, and after graduating worked briefly as an announcer for his father’s station before getting his first job in television, at WKTV in Utica, as a news announcer.

In 1952 he was given his own radio show on WFIL in Philadelphia, “Dick Clark’s Caravan of Music,” an easy-listening afternoon program. A few months later, the station’s television affiliate began an afternoon music show called “Bandstand,” with Bob Horn and Lee Stewart as hosts, which at first showed films of musical performances for young studio audiences but evolved into a dance show, as Mr. Clark recalled, when audience members got bored with the films and started dancing to the music. As the show grew in popularity, the station changed the name of Mr. Clark’s radio show to “Bandstand” as well, even though his playlist remained uncontroversial and palliating fare for a relatively small audience of middle-aged housewives.

It was in the summer of 1956 that Mr. Horn, by then the sole host of the show, was arrested and subsequently dismissed, and the station turned to young Dick Clark.

“I was 26 years old, looked the part, knew the music, was very comfortable on television,” Mr. Clark recalled. “‘They said, ‘Do you want it?’ And I said, ‘Oh, man, do I want it!’ ”

Mr. Clark’s first two marriages ended in divorce. Survivors include his wife, Kari Wigton, and ; three children, Richard, Duane and Cindy.

“American Bandstand,” a cultural touchstone for the baby-boomer generation, gave rise to the Top 40 radio format and helped make rock ’n’ roll a palatable product for visual media — not just television but also the movies. It was influential enough that ABC broadcast a 40th-anniversary special in 1992, three years after the show went off the air, and a 50th-anniversary special 10 years later. Of course, Mr. Clark, who had long since been popularly known as “the world’s oldest teenager,” was the host of both.

The show’s influence waned somewhat after it changed to a weekly format and the next year moved its base of operations to Los Angeles. And as the psychedelic era took hold in the late 1960s and rock ’n’ roll fragmented into subgenres, the show could no longer command a central role on the pop music scene.

Indeed, the show was criticized for sanitizing rock ’n’ roll, taking the edge off a sexualized and rebellious music. But it was also, in important ways, on the leading edge of the culture. Mr. Clark and his producer, Tony Mammarella, began integrating the dance floor on “American Bandstand” shortly after he took over as host; much of the music, after all, was being made by black performers.

“I can remember, a vivid recollection, the first time ever in my life I talked to a black teenager on national television; it was in what we called the rate-a-record portion of ‘Bandstand,’ ” Mr. Clark recalled. “It was the first time in a hundred years I got sweaty palms.”

He was fearful, he said, of a backlash from Southern television affiliates, but that didn’t happen. From that day on, he said, more blacks began appearing on the show. And as time went on, the show’s willingness to bridge a racial divide that went almost entirely unacknowledged by network programming was starkly apparent, “providing American television broadcasting with the most visible ongoing image of ethnic diversity until the 1970s,” according to an essay about the program on the Web site of the Chicago-based Museum of Broadcast Communications.

“We didn’t do it because we were do-gooders, or liberals,” Mr. Clark said. “It was just a thing we thought we ought to do. It was naïve.”

Mr. Clark won five Emmy Awards, including a Daytime Emmy lifetime achievement award in 1994, and in 1993 was inducted into both the Television Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He owed his success, he said, to knowing the mind of the broad audience.

“My greatest asset in life,” he said, “was I never lost touch with hot dogs, hamburgers, going to the fair and hanging out at the mall.”

Re: Angus Green

Patricia Mcarver
 

I agree with Bill's comments about Angus and the Green family.  Their commitment to the area made community journalism an honorable profession that truly served the public good. They promoted coverage of the community that was deliberate, thorough and perhaps boring by contemporary standards.  Nevertheless, Orange, Madison and Green counties were well served by that dedicated family. 


From: Bill Woolfolk <@wdw7m>
To: WJMA@...
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2012 11:43 AM
Subject: Re: [WJMA] Angus Green

It was my privilege to work with Angus as a summer intern at the Orange
County Review as a young aspiring journalist. I was fortunate to arrive
there right at the end of the Green-family era, just before the newspaper
was purchased by a larger company. I will never forget Angus nonchalantly
stopping me as I walked past him at the layout table or in the hallway,
explaining the nuances of local politics or the best information to include
in the caption of a picture of students who had achieved some scholastic
honor. He was never arrogant or condescending, instead treating me as
someone with the potential to be a decent reporter with just a little
nudging. I wish that I had paid more attention to his years of accumulated
wisdom.

I learned much from Angus and his siblings Nancy, Duff, Jim and Lillian who
also guided me in subjects from techniques for black & white photography to
why local social news columns were important to the readers of the paper.
Integrity, meticulous attention to details, and a true caring for the
community they served were evident in all of them. They had vastly
different personalities, to be sure, but were unfailingly kind and
supportive to this wet-behind-the-ears kid. I look back on my time there as
one of the best of my life.

My thoughts and prayers are with Newt, Duff, Lillian, Harriet and the rest
of family at this time. He was a truly great man from a great family.

Bill Woolfolk

On Thu, Mar 22, 2012 at 5:37 PM, Ross Hunter <rossgroups@...> wrote:

**


I've been posting too many of these...

Ross
=======================================

Publisher Angus Green dies at 87
By Allison Brophy Champion

A pioneer of print, communicator of history, World War II veteran,
stalwart of the community and devoted husband and father, Angus
McDonald Green - former longtime publisher of the Orange County
Review - died Tuesday at Culpeper Regional Hospital following years
of declining health. He was 87.
"He loved everything!" said his wife of nearly 63 years, Ada Newton
Green, a.k.a. Newt, overcome by the loss Wednesday morning. "Angus
was a most courageous brave man I have ever seen, a most wonderful
father and grandfather, a terrific husband. I just think back on it
now maybe I didn't appreciate it enough at the time."

What a time Angus McDonald Green had too, born into a Piedmont
Virginia newspaper family, compelled from an early age to community
service. The middle of seven children, he grew up on Main Street
Culpeper when it was a gravel road and lived for many years with his
wife at historic Greenwood, home of ancestor Judge John Williams
Green. The Marquis de Lafayette visited Greenwood, just south of
town, following the American Revolution, one example of how history
was central in Green's life.
As a member of Patton's Army, he marched into Berlin at the German
surrender, and was part of the generation that didn't get drafted for
military service - they volunteered, said brother Robert Duff Green,
a.k.a. Duff, a U.S. Marine.

"We grew up on World War I stories," he said Wednesday, noting his
older brother went away to war following a year at Woodberry Forest
School in Madison County.

Angus served in Belgium and, and did land at Normandy though not as
part of the invasion, said his wife. "He used to say he was on the
way to the Pacific in a ship and the war ended so they turned the
boat around and headed back," said Newt Green.

Upon his return, Angus Green used the GI Bill to study journalism for
a year at the University of Missouri before joining the family at the
Orange County Review, purchased and revived by his father, World War
I veteran James W. Green, in 1931.

Namesake Angus McDonald Green, his grandfather, founded the Culpeper
Exponent, predecessor of today's Culpeper Star-Exponent, in 1881 - so
the business was in his blood. A maternal grandfather served for the
Confederacy.

Angus married Newt in 1949 and the couple had two children, William
Nalle McDonald Green and Anne Green Pentecost, both of Florida. Angus
Green is also survived by twin sisters, Harriet and Lillian, and two
grandchildren, Travers McDonald Green and Robert Byron Green.

Working at the Orange paper, Angus handled the business end, says
Duff, working right alongside him on the editorial side. "It was his
name that went on the paycheck," said the younger Green, who still
contributes historical copy and photographs to the Orange County
Review. "I did the writing and all the photography."

The whole family, in fact, worked at the paper, Angus Green said in a
2005 interview with the Culpeper Star-Exponent. Their success was
never about money, he said. "There we were the six of the seven of us
under the same roof," the late Green recalled of working with his
siblings. "You know and I know some families don't even speak to each
other much less work successfully together. We never argued over
money." Duff says it's because they didn't have time to argue. "There
was so much work to do," he said, noting, "I didn't start working
full-time until I was in the first grade."

By the late 1960s, the business had expanded to Green Publishers Inc.
with the purchase of the Madison County Eagle, Green County Record
and the Rappahannock County News. The printing press in Orange also
cranked out several other papers and with Angus Green at the helm,
the fourth generation enterprise grew, opening offices in four
counties. He started Green Tree Press in the 1970s, publishing local
history books.

Angus Green worked 50 years in the family business, putting in
80-to-90-hour work weeks, before the stress forced him to retire. In
the early 1980s, the Green family sold its media operation, which was
later purchased by Media General of Richmond.

That didn't keep Green from giving back - "You've got to serve the
people," he said.
His service after retirement included extensive volunteerism at
Culpeper Regional Hospital, Culpeper Historical Society, Culpeper
Library Board, Town Architectural Review Board, Hospice of the
Rapidan Board, Red Cross Blood Services Chairman, American Legion and
VFW member, Museum of Culpeper History and as senior warden at St.
Stephen's Episcopal Church, among others.

In his interview with the Star-Exponent, Angus said he was most proud
of his work as a Sunday School teacher. Duff agreed, saying his
brother was most interested in being a preacher.
"He preached all over the place," Duff said. "He would like to be
remembered for that."
That, and his stint with the Blue Devils the very first year there
was a Blue Devils team. Before 1940, the CCHS team was the Golden
Tornadoes, Duff said.

"Angus was most proud of the fact that he was captain of the famous
Culpeper High School football team that went undefeated," said Duff,
of the 1940 club that went to the state championships in Bedford.
"We got whipped - I won't tell you what the score was."

Athletics was big among the Green brothers, Duff said, adding he was
mighty proud of Angus being captain of the football team. "He played
60 minutes every game - never got substituted," he said.
And there was no substitute for Angus Green off the field. He was
beloved by the Culpeper community.
"He was such a fine person and he always had Culpeper at heart,
everything he did and he spoke about was Culpeper at heart," said
Culpeper County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Chase on
Wednesday. "He loved the area and he loved the people. And all of
them loved him."

T.I. Martin said he and Green both grew up in downtown Culpeper and
often played sports against each other. "He was down on Main Street
and I was living over on East Street," Martin said. "Everybody had
like a gang and we'd end up playing a lot of football against each
other."

Martin said Culpeper was fortunate to have someone with Green's
appreciation of local history around.
"You could ask him about anything, whether it was World War II or
whatever, and he knew it all," Martin said. "He certainly knew a lot
about local history. It's really wonderful to be able to have
somebody around like that."

Angus Green loved history deeply, and was a founding trustee at the
Museum of Culpeper History. Said Zann Nelson, former museum director,
"He was a commanding presence in Culpeper and his great knowledge of
her history has and will continue to be an asset to us all."

Commenting on Green being awarded the Museum of Culpeper History
Medal of Honor in 2005, native son Marshall Gayheart said, "You can't
talk about Angus in just one or two sentences. He is one of the
hardest workers and is just a joy to work with. What can you say?
He's still sharp as a tack and has a good sense of humor, too."

Angus McDonald Green lived for community.
He once explained, "Dad said, you are honored to serve this country
not the other way around. So I'm one of those people - what can I do
for this community? It's fine to sit back and complain about
something or the other. Well let's jump in there and do something
about it."

Services will be held next Monday, March 26, 11:00 am, at St.
Stephen's Episcopal Church,
115 N. East Street, Culpeper. (Phone 540-825-8786)









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