Date   
Re: (WJMA) Pat Watson's memorial tree

JWhitten@...
 

A great tribute and a great story.

As someone who has killed every plant in his care, including a cactus, I can say, 'God bless that tree.'

Joe Whitten

-----Original Message-----
From: willowdrinkwater@... Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 9:16 PM
To: WJMA@...; WJMA@...
Subject: [WJMA] (WJMA) Pat Watson's memorial tree

It was right after Pat Watson's funeral that my new husband, Bev Nash and I planted an Arbor Day oak....a little snippet of a tree...in Pat's honor out by our riding ring on Cedar Hill Farm in Gordonsville. I knew an oak would honor Pat's stalwart self.

The next year, Bev, in his great hurry to mow the lawn, mowed Pat Watson down.

The next year, Pat came back...one or two leaves, and I put stones around her so he could see her. In August, with high grass obscuring the stones, Bev mowed her down again.

Next spring, Pat came back. Bev mowed her down for the third time, even after I put big rocks around her. As I remember the mower broke on that turn.

The next year I divorced Bev. It wasn't only the tree. And the tree? Well, it's now about 20 feet high. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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new on list

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

I have just added Marisa Murphy to the list. Marisa was a secretary/Swap Shop producer/administrative assistant/occasional fill-in announcer/etc in the middle 1970s.

She promises an update on son Kevin who was just on the Tonight Show. She told me the name of Kevin's group. I think she said the group is Tonic, but I could be wrong.

Ross
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
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800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
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Re: Good writers

Chap Harrison
 

On Monday, January 27, 2003, at 11:18 AM, Mark Johnson wrote:


--- Chap Harrison <clh@...> wrote:
Oh, ditto, that. Its my number one pet peeve. I
instantly lower the
credibility rating 50% for anyone who confuses the
two (which is
perhaps unfair, but I can't help it).
Oh stop it! Youse guys are killin' me.

Ok, ok! Maybe not 50%. And certainly not if it's someone I know, but in lew of that....

;-)

Re: More On Good writers

Chap Harrison
 

On Monday, January 27, 2003, at 10:32 AM, Bob Traister wrote:

If anyone can explain the difference between its and it's, would
*they* please respond?"
Double AMEN, Chap !!!! (I guess a double-amen equates to a Halleluja)
Ah, well, I wasn't being quite forthcoming - I've adopted the incorrect use of both "they" and "hopefully", at least in casual speech and writing (to the chagrin of you-know-who, I'm sure).

Bill Bryson, in "The Mother Tongue: English and How It Got That Way", makes a pretty good argument that "hopefully" isn't really being used any differently than a number of other words ending in "-fully".

And there was recently an article, I think in the NY Times, about the "he and/or she" problem, that concluded that "they" would eventually be accepted, much the way "you" became both the singular and plural form at some point (even though we know it's really y'all).

William Zinnser ("On Writing Well") deplores "hopefully" but retains the right to say "It's just not me."

Chap
(who is now going to stop proof-reading his own WJMA emails four times before sending them)

Re: Good writers

Mark Johnson
 

--- Chap Harrison <clh@...> wrote:
Oh, ditto, that. Its my number one pet peeve. I
instantly lower the
credibility rating 50% for anyone who confuses the
two (which is
perhaps unfair, but I can't help it).
Oh stop it! Youse guys are killin' me.

Seriously, while I make no claims to flawless
grammar/spelling I do make an effort to write via
email as carefully as I would a "real" letter.

Sometimes though, my brain gets out of sync with my
fingers. Such as the other day when I typed this line
on this very list:

"I wished you had told me when I was 32"

YEW!

Mark Johnson

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Re: More On Good writers

Bob Traister <dxcc@...>
 

How about the erratic and erroneous use of "its" and "it's"?
Whew. Its' an epidemic and its annoying. Many people don't understand
that it's use is tricky.

AMEN, Les !!

And, I could name quite a few more improper usage examples, such as THEIR
vs. THERE, FOR vs. FOUR, and, of course, the infamous TO vs. TWO vs. TOO. We
also have the nefarious non-word "fourty."

If anyone can explain the difference between its and it's, would
*they* please respond?"
Double AMEN, Chap !!!! (I guess a double-amen equates to a Halleluja)

As a writer, I would overcome this problematical usage by restructuring the
target of "they." I would have changed your example to "If there are persons
who can explain the difference betw........, would they please respond."
Another method I might use is, "If anyone can explain the difference
betw....., would he or she please respond." However, I once saw this taken
too far by a beginning editor at Prentice-Hall who was editing a book I had
written on Medical Instrumentation. She was a "he or she" advocate and
changed one of my sentences to something on the order of, "When the medical
technician encounters such a problem, he or she should certify the test
results with the submitting laboratories to the complete satisfaction of
himself or herself." This was a bit over the top.


Cinema/Grammar Trivia:

In the movie, White Christmas, Bing Crosby comments to Rosemary Clooney
(while watching Danny Kaye and Vera Ellen on the dance floor), "They look
well together." This is grammatically correct, whereas most of us would have
said, "They look good together."


Political/Pronunciation Trivia:

The pronunciation of our Vice President's last name is "Cheeney." However,
no one wants to accept this, since all of the press refer to him as Dick
"Chainey."


Firearm/Pronunciation Trivia:

The famous standard-issue field weapon of World War II, the M1 Garand, was
invented by John C. Garand. The last name is pronounced "GARE-und," with the
accent on the first syllable. For nearly 60 years, the great majority of
references to the inventor of what is arguably the greatest military rifle
in history and to the firearm that bears his name use the incorrect
pronunciation of "ga-RAND" (accent on the second syllable). Recently, I
heard a firearms expert on television pronounce this name incorrectly. I
immediately sent him an email about his error and suggested that a correct
pronunciation in the future would provide the deserved recognition and place
of honor for the inventor, Mr. Garand. He replied with a terse message
telling me that even if I were correct, the mispronunciation had gone on for
so long that "ga-RAND" was now correct, because it is "popular usage that
determines how a word is pronounced." Horse Hockey.(my comment)


Perhaps, I am obsessing about all of this. I guess it's time for another
Prozac.



...bob

P.S. These email messages are taking me four times longer than usual to
write, since I have to quadruple check each one to make certain that I am
not a practitioner of my own complaint.

Re: DeVivi's

JWhitten@...
 

Your e-mail message brings up two memories of DeVivi's for me.

First, the grits.

Second, I worked at Hardee's, and the whole staff had to go to a room at the adjacent hotel for a polygraph test. The machine went crazy when I admitted to giving a small bag of fries to a fellow co-worker. Is it a false-positive?

Joe Whitten

-----Original Message-----
From: nospam2@... Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 3:52 PM
To: WJMA@...; WJMA@...
Subject: Re: [WJMA] DeVivi's

On Thu, 2003-01-23 at 15:11, Chap Harrison wrote:
DeVivi's (as I think it was spelled) Chicken in the Rough restaurant > was at the south end of town on Rt. 15. It was the only game in town > for a family-style sit-down restaurant, unless you counted Bartley's or > Bartlett's, near the fire station.
Okay, gotcha :-) I was under the impression, from reading the mail,
that perhaps the station and the restaurant were more closely linked
than that.

I remember the place... My dad worked for a while across from there at
Virginia Metal Products as a personnel manager. I had their so-called
Southern Fried Chicken (with honey on the side IIRC) a number of times. I also recall a little restaurant closer to the station where my dad
took me for steak sandwiches... Red Lion, maybe? Something like that. Then there was eventually the Tastee Freeze, and after that, all
culinary hell broke loose. Orange got that little fried chicken place
in front of Safeway, then Hardees, then you name it - by golly, even
pizza by the slice in 7-11 (with the fancy concrete parking lot)...

My fave, though, was Barnaby's in Charlottesville. I have yet to find
a pizza as good as that one since they closed down. At the station, though, I *lived* on the glass bottle sodas dispensed
from that open-the-glass-door-and-pull-it-out soda machine.

Which reminds me - Pepsi belches slowed WAAAY down with the reel-to-reel
in one of the back studios sounded REALLY cool ... discovering that was
one of the technical high points of my time there, as I recall.

<fade to Ren Hoek singing, "Memories ... ">



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Re: Hurricanes, sickness, and more

Jay Kiernan
 

Phil Audibert!

I so enjoyed reading your story! You've been a busy lad. So many ventures
and adventures!

I went to your band web-site, and really enjoyed it. I'm listening to"
Lord Franklin" even as I type this (so good to hear your voice again). I
look forward to hearing the CD when it's finished, so please do let me know
when it comes out. I'm of 100% Irish ancestry, and that music really
speaks to me! So tell me, how did you manage to land a gig as the only guy
in a band full of beautiful women?

You dog.

I have very fond memories of an ad hoc musical trio that you and I hastily
assembled to play at a party in the Orange area. It was just a one-time
gig, but it was a lot of fun! I still think of that little band everytime
I hear Steve Stills' "Johnnie's Garden." That was a busy night, as I
began that evening by interviewing Kenny Loggins, backstage, at a concert
in Harrisonburg before jumping in the car to race to the party in the
Orange area.

Phil Audibert wrote:
Great to hear from youse again. Remember when you were so sick and stayed in
our guest room while some Hurricane raged outside? Man, you slept for a
solid 18 hours.
I have only a vague recollection of that, Phil (but thanks for giving me
shelter from the storm). I'm guessing that was probably in '79, right
around the time that a bout with walking pneumonia ended my time at WJMA
(and damn near ended my time, period). But I'm still an accomplished
sleeper when I put my mind to it, and when necessary, I can still do 18
hours at a stretch!

There was a time in 1979, as Russ Roberts pointed out earlier, when I was,
as he put it, "...domicile challenged side for a month or so." After I'd
returned to Virginia from my foray to Pennsylvania, I was living with some
friends of mine in Charlottesville--a married couple, Ron & Brenda. But
when they had a baby, I moved out before actually lining up another place
to live (I didn't want to be an intrusion on the family unit once the baby
arrived). I slept on a lot of couches, while attempting to secure new digs
during that very brief period, and also had some poorly timed car trouble,
which necessitated my hitchiking from Charlottesville to my job at Radio
Orange for a few days. I caught a bad cold in the process, which slowly
developed into walking pneumonia. Those weren't my best days.

Ironically, that baby is now all grown up, and is now my niece! As it
turned out, Ron & Brenda, the married couple with whom I had lived, broke
up in the mid eighties. As fate would have it, one of my younger brothers
married Brenda soon thereafter. Between them, they now have seven kids!

jay kiernan
'76-'79

Re: Good writers

Mark Johnson
 

--- Les <grandmananer@...> wrote:
How about the erratic and erroneous use of "its" and
"it's"?
Whew. Its' an epidemic and its annoying. Many people
don't understand
that it's use is tricky.
lol

Good one Les.

Mark Johnson

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Re: Good writers

Chap Harrison
 

On Monday, January 27, 2003, at 08:48 AM, Les wrote:

How about the erratic and erroneous use of "its" and "it's"?
Whew. Its' an epidemic and its annoying. Many people don't understand
that it's use is tricky.
Oh, ditto, that. Its my number one pet peeve. I instantly lower the credibility rating 50% for anyone who confuses the two (which is perhaps unfair, but I can't help it).

While we're on the subject, how do people feel about:

"If anyone can explain the difference between its and it's, would *they* please respond?"
- and -
"*Hopefully*, we all know the difference between its and it's."

Re: This Just In

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

I was at Costco Saturday and saw the book. Thumbed
throught it but did not pull the trigger.

Mark Johnson

--- Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
wrote:
This morning Don Imus interviewed Bob Schieffer from
CBS news about
his new book "This Just In".
Mark,

He told in interesting story this morning about being a newspaper police reporter in Fort Worth when Kennedy was shot. As he came into the office to help he picked up a ringing phone. A lady on the other end asked if she could get a ride to Dallas. Shieffer asked who was calling and she replied "Oswald's mother". He offered to drive her.

When they got to Dallas Police headquarters he told a guard at the door who he had and asked where to take her to keep away from all those reporters. They were ushered into a room and he thought Lee Harvey was to be brought in soon. Shieffer said in those days if you looked like you belonged you could go anywhere. He was anticipating a real scoop.

Before Lee Harvey could be brought in, an FBI type asked who he was. When he identified himself, Schieffer said, the look he got was his first death threat.

Appologies to Bob Scheiffer for any omissions and errors.

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

Should we be nervous?

Les <grandmananer@...>
 

Based on some of the messages that members post on this delightful
resource, the following story may reflect how some of us felt when
training for show biz and/or for computer use:

A fellow computer programmer for a consulting group had
designed some software for one of our largest accounts. He
asked my help in putting it into operation.

At first, he handled most of the work. Eventually, though,
he asked me to help with the last phase of the training.
When I sat down with one woman and told her I would be
showing her how to make changes to the files, she sighed
with relief. "I'm so glad you're teaching me instead of
him."

Surprised, I said that my colleague was far more
experienced than I was.

"Yes," she said, "but I feel much more comfortable with
you. I get nervous around really smart people."


Les Myers-1970-72 + freelance production projects

--
http://fastmail.fm - And now for something completely different...

Re: Good writers

Les <grandmananer@...>
 

How about the erratic and erroneous use of "its" and "it's"?
Whew. Its' an epidemic and its annoying. Many people don't understand
that it's use is tricky.

On Sun, 26 Jan 2003 22:13:07 -0500, "Bob Traister" <dxcc@...>
said:

Hi Cathy:

Thank you "verry" much for the "complements". You can be "shure" that
"you're" comments have "fell" on receptive ears. We all "no" how hard it
is
to "right" really "good", but we all give it the good old "collage" try.
I
know that "your" the kind of person who appreciates "cotangent"
paragraphs
as much as I do. And, yes, we all "learnt" a lot of good
"pronounciations"
from Arch.


On a serious note: The paragraph above (above paragraph?) contains many
of
the common email/BB spelling and grammatical errors that we all see on a
daily basis. The one that irritates me most is the use of "your" for
"you're" and vice versa. I heartily agree with your observations. The
members of this group, yourself included, seem to care about what they
write
(and, about those who will eventually read their missives). I suspect
that
the various messages we receive are spell-checked and critiqued numerous
times before they are finally transmitted. Good show!!

Jest leting awf steem,

...bob







----- Original Message -----
From: "Cathy Christovich" <cchristovich@...>
To: <WJMA@...>
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2003 8:31 PM
Subject: [WJMA] Good writers


WJMA lister, Jay Kiernan writes:
.and Billy Joel
drives into a tree (though it should have been The Captain & Tenille
instead).
Hi, Gang . . . I've always wished their name had been "The Captain and
Chenille."

I will not include myself in this endorsement, but I could not help but
notice over the last two weeks that this list has the highest literacy
level I have ever encountered on the Internet. I read a lot of PBS e-mail
traffic, and while I cut the hard-core engineering types some slack (since
I'm sure their math SATs were MUCH higher than mine,) I can't get over the
inability of many posters to craft a grammatical, correctly-spelled
English sentence. I play a game -- trying to guess their ages; with my
predjudice being that the younger they are, the worse their writing
skills. When I have been able to verify I've found that this is usually
the case. Without getting into "what's the world coming to?" I think we
should all thank Arch and all the hard-boiled English teachers who got to
us before he did.

And hats off to you listers, who write cogent paragraphs even for an
e-mail list.

Best to all, . . . Cathy (Wills) Christovicy -- '70-'71






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Re: This Just In

Mark Johnson
 

I was at Costco Saturday and saw the book. Thumbed
throught it but did not pull the trigger.

Mark Johnson

--- Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
wrote:
This morning Don Imus interviewed Bob Schieffer from
CBS news about
his new book "This Just In".
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(No subject)

lwestby2002@...
 

Hi. It's me again....just a few comments - for what they are
worth...Phil Ode Bear - that could be the name of a new men's cologne - I
don't think I want to get near anybody wearing it, but it just might catch
on....You, my dear man ain't no slouch - thought I'd add some class to this
high tone missive - when it comes to the singing and playing, and I look
forward to buying your new CD - think you could autograph it for me?

Willow - Willow? Barbra, honey you've been out of Virginia too long - Are
you still selling real estate?

Pat Watson died quite a while ago, and she was young. Does anybody know
where her son is? That was a special woman and a character!

Re: I still want to hear the Chet Burgess/Jean Love newscast story!

Jay Kiernan
 

Hi Reid,

Jay Kiernan here. Glad to hear that you saw McCartney, too!

Reid Harrison wrote:
I saw it out here in SoCal. Didn't go to the show at the big fancy
Staples Center, the one where all the
"stars" probably caught it. Rather, I saw it at the Anaheim Pond,
which lent a funny kind of a B-List patina to the experience.
The biggest name I saw was Roy Firestone. Anyhoo, it was quite an
amazing show and was impressed at how strong his pipes still are.
Incredibly strong vocals! Great concert!


Jay, weren't you in something like The Dixie Roadducks?
Quack. Quack. The Roadducks were just forming during my senior year in
college ('75-'76), and I used to commute between Harrisonburg (where I
attended James Madison University) and the D.C. area (where the band was
based).

The band had learned enough songs to start playing out by the summer of
'76. So, the day after I graduated from college, the Ducks hit the road,
mostly playing all over the state of Virginia, with the occasional out of
state trip. But I was not a happy camper. The drummer was a real
entrepeneurial, pushy, loudmouthed control freak, though charming in his
own way. Despite the fact that we played six or seven nights a week, most
of my earnings consisted of ham sandwiches and Budweiser beer. I rarely
saw any cash money (which the drummer controlled). It just didn't feel
right. And though I loved the travelling and the performing, the business
side of it was more than I could stand, so I quit by early fall of '76.

That's what I was doing just before I came to WJMA.

The Roadducks stayed together (without me) for twenty years or more, and I
would run into them over the years (we remained friendly). But what had
began as a rock n' roll band, soon devolved into one of them there "
least-common-denominator" southern rock bands, playing venues where most of
the patrons didn't seem to have many teeth, but loved to hear "Freebird"
eighteen times a night before heading back to the trailer to sleep it off.

The Roadducks did rise to achieve some degree of success (I have heard),
though I doubt that anyone but the drummer made any money. He now owns a
rock n' roll night club in Northern Virginia.
I heard from him just last year, in fact. I've always liked him (and the
other members of the band), but I couldn't stand working with (for) him.

During my time at WJMA, I formed an acoustic trio in Charlottesville (we
played at Horsefeathers in Orange once or twice). But that ended when I
left JMA to take a job in Pennsylvania as production director for a small,
fully automated station there.

After returning to Virginia and WJMA just shy of a year later, I sang in a
series of part time bands, alternating between acoustic duos and full tilt
rock & roll bands. After leaving WJMA the second and last time in '79, I
went to work at 3WV radio in Charlottesville, where I did eight to midnight
for about a year. I was then invited to join another travelling rock band
(which I enjoyed immensely). I did that for a year or so until the band
broke up. That's when I returned to 3WV to do mid days, which was a lot of
fun. I was also in a part time acoustic duo during that time, playing out
three or four nights a week in and around Charlottesville.

I left Virginia in the spring of 1984 to pursue an advertising career in
Atlanta, and I didn't play in any bands at all. In '92, I moved to Miami,
where I also didn't play in any bands. Then, in '97 (following a divorce),
I moved to the Tampa Bay area. And after not having performed musically
since '84, I joined a four man British invasion era sort of band. I played
drums and sang in that group. We did a lot of Beatles, Stones, Who, CSN,
Grassroots, Guess Who, Kinks and the like. That was a lot of fun, too,
with tons of four part harmonies.

But an opportunity to reconcile with my ex-wife brought me back to South
Florida. Alas, the reconciliation was short-lived, and I returned to the
Tampa Bay area after six months.

Currently, I'm not performing, though lately I have had the itch to do a
small, part time acoustic band. So, I'm looking into that now.

Gosh, Reid, I hadn't thought of the Roadducks much in many years. I am so
glad I bailed out of that band when I did, or I never would've worked at
WJMA!

jay kiernan
'76-'79

This Just In

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

This morning Don Imus interviewed Bob Schieffer from CBS news about his new book "This Just In". It sounds like a interesting book which covers much of the era we've been remembering on this list.

Imus says:
"Hey! Have you read the new Schieffer book? Well, you ought to because it's great. It's just fascinating stuff. It's like a history of our times scene through the eyes of one our country's most respected journalists. It's a great book."-Imus

Ross
76-81
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
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Re: Oh-de-Bear

Phil Audibert
 

Thanks for the kind words, Barb, and we are expecting you back in this area
permanently this summer!

Phil

The Ryegrass Rollers

Phil Audibert
 

Yo Jay, thanks for the kind words, and yes the lasses are exactly half my
age. Good thing that Susie loves 'em all...like daughters to us. And at
gigs, the circling wolves have to get past the Roller Daddy before they can
get to his Roller Babes! On top of that, they are the hands down best
musicians I've ever played with. I just try to keep up.

Phil

new on the list

Dominion Market Research staff <staff@...>
 

I've just added Duke DuFrane to the list.

I don't have my cheat sheet to remind me of Duke's time at WJMA. As I recall it was the late 1960s. Duke, please correct that for the record and tell us what you've been doing.

Clint Estes has sent me contact emails for Dave Blunt (news) and Dean Palmer (aka Eric St James)(sports). Anyone else have names to add?

Ross
71-86
--
Dominion Market Research
309 Madison Road
PO Box 791
Orange VA 22960-0464
800-328-2588 540-672-2327 fax: 540-672-0296
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/