can an ulcer be detected?


karin@...
 

I have a 20 yo female patient that I am primarily seeing for nutritional counseling. Her CC was stomach pain mostly in the mornings, low energy, and anxiety. When she started with me she was smoking a lot of marijuana, vaping nicotine, and drinking large amounts of Red Bull. I encouraged her to start cutting back on the weed and Red Bull and this improved her stomach pain greatly. She has been learning better self care and how to make better choices. So, this has been the approach I have taken with her, going back to basics. Currently, she just came to see me after a month off because of time out of the office for me. She was back to her old habits and having more pain. I decided to do a VM eval and there was quite a bit of tenderness all along D2, stomach was clear. There wasn't time for treatment, just looking for dysfunctional areas. She has no history of ulcers but has never had a workup for them. This makes me wonder if it's possible to pick them up because of the amount of tenderness noted in the duodenum. I have referred her to her primary to investigate.

Karin Michalk, PT, CNS


Thomas Takeuchi
 

Karin
An ulcer can be detected using Visceral Manipulation Listening and Manual Thermal Diagnosis but not by tenderness which is not a valid indication. 

Using either GL or MTD would bring you to the area. MTD would give you the more specific location and depth AND if the Listening had an emotional, physical or functional component.

 Inhibition would give you a more exact location and if there were more Listenings, which is primary. 

 LL would give you the precise location or depth. Is it surrounding, on, or in the duodenum?  Is it more the mucosal membrane layer?  

The qualities of perception discussed in LT1 would give you descriptive informations such as size, shape, orientation… that would indicate an ulcer. Remember there would be several distinct differences between an ulcer and a sphincter.

 And LT2 would allowing you to discover if there are other systems involved, nervous, vascular…

So VM would be a proper and appropriate approach to your patient. 

Tom Takeuchi a student of VM


On Jun 25, 2022, at 4:21 PM, karin@... wrote:

I have a 20 yo female patient that I am primarily seeing for nutritional counseling. Her CC was stomach pain mostly in the mornings, low energy, and anxiety. When she started with me she was smoking a lot of marijuana, vaping nicotine, and drinking large amounts of Red Bull. I encouraged her to start cutting back on the weed and Red Bull and this improved her stomach pain greatly. She has been learning better self care and how to make better choices. So, this has been the approach I have taken with her, going back to basics. Currently, she just came to see me after a month off because of time out of the office for me. She was back to her old habits and having more pain. I decided to do a VM eval and there was quite a bit of tenderness all along D2, stomach was clear. There wasn't time for treatment, just looking for dysfunctional areas. She has no history of ulcers but has never had a workup for them. This makes me wonder if it's possible to pick them up because of the amount of tenderness noted in the duodenum. I have referred her to her primary to investigate.

Karin Michalk, PT, CNS