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HP 9000-3xx RCL key #VintageHPComputers


Anders
 

The 98x6 keyboards have it and it is sort of handy. Is there such a key, or scancode for the 3xx? Ie recall the last line typed.


Martin Trusler
 

There is when running RMB. On the IFT keyboard, i think it’s the top left key in the group above the numeric keypad. This doesn’t work under HP-UX but maybe there is a unix command to recall previously entered lines?
Martin

J P Martin Trusler 
Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London

On 24 Aug 2020, at 14:20, Anders <anders.gustafsson@...> wrote:

The 98x6 keyboards have it and it is sort of handy. Is there such a key, or scancode for the 3xx? Ie recall the last line typed.


Martin Trusler
 

and here is a method for HP-UX:



J P Martin Trusler 
Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London

On 24 Aug 2020, at 14:52, Martin Trusler via groups.io <martin.trusler@...> wrote:

There is when running RMB. On the IFT keyboard, i think it’s the top left key in the group above the numeric keypad. This doesn’t work under HP-UX but maybe there is a unix command to recall previously entered lines?
Martin

J P Martin Trusler 
Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London

On 24 Aug 2020, at 14:20, Anders <anders.gustafsson@...> wrote:

The 98x6 keyboards have it and it is sort of handy. Is there such a key, or scancode for the 3xx? Ie recall the last line typed.


Anders
 

You mean F10 in this graphic?
http://www.dalton.ax/hpkbd/hil/HPKeyboard.svg


Martin Trusler
 

Yes (or possibly F11 if it’s not that one).

J P Martin Trusler 
Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London

On 24 Aug 2020, at 14:57, Anders <anders.gustafsson@...> wrote:

You mean F10 in this graphic?
http://www.dalton.ax/hpkbd/hil/HPKeyboard.svg


Anders
 

F9 it is. Funny, but I had forgotten to map them in my keyboard adapter :) Now I do not have to type INITIALIZE ":CS80,700,0" over and over again testing the formatting code.

And, yes, for hose that are wondering... I have not done any work on it over the summer. PS/2 is done and works and I will get started on USB this fall. I will make the PCB "universal" ie if you do not need USB, then you skip those components.


Bruce
 

Looking forward to it

Cheers!


Quoting Anders <anders.gustafsson@pedago.fi>:

F9 it is. Funny, but I had forgotten to map them in my keyboard adapter :) Now I do not have to type INITIALIZE ":CS80,700,0" over and over again testing the formatting code.

And, yes, for hose that are wondering... I have not done any work on it over the summer. PS/2 is done and works and I will get started on USB this fall. I will make the PCB "universal" ie if you do not need USB, then you skip those components.


 

On 8/24/20 9:52 AM, Martin Trusler wrote:
There is when running RMB. On the IFT keyboard, i think it’s the top left key in the group above the numeric keypad. This doesn’t work under HP-UX but maybe there is a unix command to recall previously entered lines?
There is no UNIX command, per se, but command history is a function of some shells, so how it's done is completely dependent upon which shell you're running.

The original Bourne shell ("sh") has no command line history functionality. The C shell ("csh") has basic recall by typing "!" followed by the first few characters, enough to make it unique, of the command you want to re-execute, and hitting <cr> executes it. "!!<cr>" just executes the last command.

The Korn shell ("ksh"), GNU Bash, zsh, and most other modern shells have interactive command line recall and editing functionality that take various forms. However, most of the implement the same editing keys that are used by the common UNIX-world editors, emacs and vi. The emacs commands are ^P for previous line, ^N for next line, ^F for forward character, and ^B for backward character. These functions are most often available via the arrow keys if your terminal and shell are properly configured.

The vi commands are similar; <esc> followed by K recalls the previous line, L the next line, etc.

Again, this is not a function of UNIX, but of a UNIX command shell, of which there are many.

-Dave

--
Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
New Kensington, PA