Blade RF


Keith Le Boutillier <keithl@...>
 

 

Hi Group

 

I keep looking at the RF bade unit at http://www.nuand.com/blog/shop/ Out of the box the bladeRF can tune from 300MHz to 3.8GHz without the need for extra boards and has current open source drivers.

 

Has anybody looked to see if it’s of any use in the field of microwaves or as a transverter driver I can’t help thinking that this might end up being a winter project for me to play with.

 

73 Keith GU6EFB


g4guo <chbrain@...>
 

Hi Keith,

I rather like the Myriad RF board http://myriadrf.org/
which is basically the RF part only. Unfortunately the
bridge board that connects it to the FPGA development board
I use is currently out of stock. I read that Myriad are going
to come up with their own equivalent.

Considering the chip is UK designed it seems strange that you
have to go to some far east supplier with a dodgy website to order
stuff.

One thing I find slightly alarming is the people that have
embraced this technology are by and large not Radio Amateurs
but the maker community and university undergraduates.

We are obviously missing a trick here. I guess the issue is that
you have to be highly numerate to develop software for this type
of thing and judging by the breakdown of the UK licence exam
results by question, numeracy is not the strong point of most
candidates.

- Charles G4GUO

--- In ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com, Keith Le Boutillier <keithl@...> wrote:


Hi Group

I keep looking at the RF bade unit at http://www.nuand.com/blog/shop/ Out of the box the bladeRF can tune from 300MHz to 3.8GHz without the need for extra boards and has current open source drivers.

Has anybody looked to see if it's of any use in the field of microwaves or as a transverter driver I can't help thinking that this might end up being a winter project for me to play with.

73 Keith GU6EFB


Andy G4JNT
 

Yes, what has happened to design and build in in the rad Am community even over the last 13 years?
 
I was recently perusing the Jan and Feb 2000 issues of RadCom and they were full of interesting stuff with proper design techniques and thought behind them.  
Contrast with the latest two editions of Scatterpoint that had nothing constructional.
 
And don't say its all too complicated with SMT and software / firmware.  The technically savvy Rad Ams of old all learned transistors and ICs quickly enough
 
Is it that people are doing stuff (I know they are; emails and comments on the various Groups say so)  but they aren't publishing in print. 
Why not - you sometimes even get paid for it!
 
 
Andy
G4JNT


 

On 22 July 2013 17:21, g4guo <chbrain@...> wrote:
 

Hi Keith,

I rather like the Myriad RF board http://myriadrf.org/
which is basically the RF part only. Unfortunately the
bridge board that connects it to the FPGA development board
I use is currently out of stock. I read that Myriad are going
to come up with their own equivalent.

Considering the chip is UK designed it seems strange that you
have to go to some far east supplier with a dodgy website to order
stuff.

One thing I find slightly alarming is the people that have
embraced this technology are by and large not Radio Amateurs
but the maker community and university undergraduates.

We are obviously missing a trick here. I guess the issue is that
you have to be highly numerate to develop software for this type
of thing and judging by the breakdown of the UK licence exam
results by question, numeracy is not the strong point of most
candidates.

- Charles G4GUO



--- In ukmicrowaves@..., Keith Le Boutillier wrote:
>
>
> Hi Group
>
> I keep looking at the RF bade unit at http://www.nuand.com/blog/shop/ Out of the box the bladeRF can tune from 300MHz to 3.8GHz without the need for extra boards and has current open source drivers.
>
> Has anybody looked to see if it's of any use in the field of microwaves or as a transverter driver I can't help thinking that this might end up being a winter project for me to play with.
>
> 73 Keith GU6EFB
>



Keith Le Boutillier <keithl@...>
 

Hi Charles

 

Thanks for the reply. I would have thought there would be more comment on this subject but yours is the only one.

 

I have looked at the Myriadrf and it looks interesting I will do some more research on this unit.

I agree with your comments and I am surprised by the lack of interest in these types of units.

 

73 Keith GU6EFB

 

From: ukmicrowaves@... [mailto:ukmicrowaves@...] On Behalf Of g4guo
Sent: 22 July 2013 17:22
To: ukmicrowaves@...
Subject: [ukmicrowaves] Re: Blade RF

 

 

Hi Keith,

I rather like the Myriad RF board http://myriadrf.org/
which is basically the RF part only. Unfortunately the
bridge board that connects it to the FPGA development board
I use is currently out of stock. I read that Myriad are going
to come up with their own equivalent.

Considering the chip is UK designed it seems strange that you
have to go to some far east supplier with a dodgy website to order
stuff.

One thing I find slightly alarming is the people that have
embraced this technology are by and large not Radio Amateurs
but the maker community and university undergraduates.

We are obviously missing a trick here. I guess the issue is that
you have to be highly numerate to develop software for this type
of thing and judging by the breakdown of the UK licence exam
results by question, numeracy is not the strong point of most
candidates.

- Charles G4GUO

--- In ukmicrowaves@..., Keith Le Boutillier <keithl@...> wrote:
>
>
> Hi Group
>
> I keep looking at the RF bade unit at http://www.nuand.com/blog/shop/ Out of the box the bladeRF can tune from 300MHz to 3.8GHz without the need for extra boards and has current open source drivers.
>
> Has anybody looked to see if it's of any use in the field of microwaves or as a transverter driver I can't help thinking that this might end up being a winter project for me to play with.
>
> 73 Keith GU6EFB
>


g4bao
 

Andy wrote

Is it that people are doing stuff?....

.....No. I think it's case of

"Nah..... There's an App for that...... Someone else can do that hard stuff and I'll just pay them and use it...."

(Or am I just being cynical? :-)   ) 

Or just hot?..... peaked over 31 degrees on the Fen Edge today

73
John 
 


Lawrence <lawrence@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Talbot

Yes, what has happened to design and build in in the rad Am community even over the last 13 years?
Maybe it has something to do with the average age of Radio Amateurs. I was first licensed in 1962 at the age of 18. I started on 70 cms when there was no commercial equipment for that band. I had to make most of it myself and I also had to use those hot glass devices. Later I made one of the first preamps using a transistor for that band when I was given a couple of 2N1742 transistors.

Now I am nearly 70 and my eyesight is not as good as it was. I had cataract surgery 10 years ago so my eyes are now fixed focus. I also find it harder to locate the components I want to use and those mainly need to be the wire ended ones I was used to using 30 years ago.

The last project that I made myself and published in RadCom was for some 6 m beacons that I made. That was published in 1997. I have published some articles since then but concentrating on theory rather than construction. One was on the various phasing methods for SSB and one was on receiver noise performance.

I have done some courses to catch up with some topics and revise others. The last Open University course I did was in 2001 and was T327 Radio Frequency Engineering. Last year I did the on-line course that was run from MIT and enjoyed that one. This year I went in another direction and did a course presented by Edinburgh University on Astrobiology. Anyone one here fancy trying for the Elser-Mathes cup?

This year I was intending to make a transverter for 4 m and that would either have been from one of the kits available or using components that I have in stock. That idea changed when I was offered on that was ready made and we can blame another member of this group for that. I had better not mention Conrad by name!

The highest frequency band I am now on is 23 cms and I am using an IC-910X with 10 watts output. Perhaps someone could give me some advice on making a preamp and power amp for it. I would need to know where to get the devices from including the coax relays. After that I would hope to eventually join the rest of you on some of the higher frequency bands.

73, Lawrence GJ3RAX


Tim Hague M0AFJ
 

Lawrance, I can let you have some suitable relays FOC, if you are QTHR

Best regards, Tim Hague, M0AFJ
Skype m0afj.Tim
Sent on my iPad

On 22 Jul 2013, at 20:13, "Lawrence" <lawrence@werewoolf.org> wrote:

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Talbot

Yes, what has happened to design and build in in the rad Am community even
over the last 13 years?
Maybe it has something to do with the average age of Radio Amateurs. I was first
licensed in 1962 at the age of 18. I started on 70 cms when there was no
commercial equipment for that band. I had to make most of it myself and I also
had to use those hot glass devices. Later I made one of the first preamps using
a transistor for that band when I was given a couple of 2N1742 transistors.

Now I am nearly 70 and my eyesight is not as good as it was. I had cataract
surgery 10 years ago so my eyes are now fixed focus. I also find it harder to
locate the components I want to use and those mainly need to be the wire ended
ones I was used to using 30 years ago.

The last project that I made myself and published in RadCom was for some 6 m
beacons that I made. That was published in 1997. I have published some articles
since then but concentrating on theory rather than construction. One was on the
various phasing methods for SSB and one was on receiver noise performance.

I have done some courses to catch up with some topics and revise others. The
last Open University course I did was in 2001 and was T327 Radio Frequency
Engineering. Last year I did the on-line course that was run from MIT and
enjoyed that one. This year I went in another direction and did a course
presented by Edinburgh University on Astrobiology. Anyone one here fancy trying
for the Elser-Mathes cup?

This year I was intending to make a transverter for 4 m and that would either
have been from one of the kits available or using components that I have in
stock. That idea changed when I was offered on that was ready made and we can
blame another member of this group for that. I had better not mention Conrad by
name!

The highest frequency band I am now on is 23 cms and I am using an IC-910X with
10 watts output. Perhaps someone could give me some advice on making a preamp
and power amp for it. I would need to know where to get the devices from
including the coax relays. After that I would hope to eventually join the rest
of you on some of the higher frequency bands.

73, Lawrence GJ3RAX






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Lawrence <lawrence@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Hague

Lawrance, I can let you have some suitable relays FOC, if you are QTHR
Best regards, Tim Hague, M0AFJ

That is very kind of you. It would certainly help me to get started on the project.

I am not QTHR but I will send you my address via your email address on QRZ.

73, Lawrence GJ3RAX


g4guo <chbrain@...>
 

Hi Keith,

I posted something about BladeRf on the BATC website sometime ago,
there were a few comments but not much interest.

Personally I am too busy with a project called DATV-Express which
is similar to BladeRf but only does transmit. It does not use such
an integrated device. It has a small FPGA on it which does the maths
a dual channel DAC, analogue 5 MHz anti alias filter and an
integrated 72 - 2480 MHz VCO/IQ modulator. Blade or more precisely
the LMS6002D field programmable RF ic does the DAC/filter/VCO/IQ mod
(and associated receive chain) in a single device. The neat
thing about BladeRF is that the filter is programmable the one on my
project is fixed which means I have to use different interpolation
rates depending on the signal I am transmitting to ensure any alias
is above 5 MHz.

If BladeRF had been available when I started I would have probably
used that platform. On the plus side I have had to write all the
software/firmware/FPGA code myself so I expect I have learnt a
lot more than I would otherwise. The other plus is my code should
run on BladeRF with little changes.

- Charles

--- In ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com, Keith Le Boutillier <keithl@...> wrote:

Hi Charles

Thanks for the reply. I would have thought there would be more comment on this subject but yours is the only one.

I have looked at the Myriadrf and it looks interesting I will do some more research on this unit.
I agree with your comments and I am surprised by the lack of interest in these types of units.

73 Keith GU6EFB

From: ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of g4guo
Sent: 22 July 2013 17:22
To: ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ukmicrowaves] Re: Blade RF


g4guo <chbrain@...>
 

In the old days Andy I guess people had to publish on paper to get
their work recognised. These days people just stick it on their
blog. The trouble is nobody can find their blog.

As you know I have had a few items published in the ARRL/TAPR
convention proceedings. Those have got a far greater coverage
than anything on my blog has ever had. So there is still place
for paper.

- Charles

--- In ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com, Andy Talbot <andy.g4jnt@...> wrote:

Yes, what has happened to design and build in in the rad Am community even
over the last 13 years?

I was recently perusing the Jan and Feb 2000 issues of RadCom and they were
full of interesting stuff with proper design techniques and thought behind
them.
Contrast with the latest two editions of Scatterpoint that had nothing
constructional.

And don't say its all too complicated with SMT and software / firmware.
The technically savvy Rad Ams of old all learned transistors and ICs
quickly enough

Is it that people are doing stuff (I know they are; emails and comments on
the various Groups say so) but they aren't publishing in print.
Why not - you sometimes even get paid for it!


Andy
G4JNT