Date   

Re: Now for latching relays ...

Nick Gregory G0HIK
 

That looks spot on, I wonder if I can make a "Fat Finger" version, (Non SMD) and using component type I've heard off, I'm so way out of touch with those parts.

I see hupRF used to supply a kit to do that, sadly its been discontinued.

Nick G0HIK


Re: Now for latching relays ...

Neil Smith G4DBN
 

I run a separate 28V relay supply into the masthead boxes and pulse the latching relays with an optoisolated control signal, but they all have tellback contacts which are linked to the sequencers. I do have one very nice Radiall latching job that lacks tellbacks, but I think I can use a couple of SMD Hall sensors and a tiny magnet.

The failsafe relays are also fed from the 28V supply, but work like Kent's. After a 300 ms pulse of full voltage, the driver reduces the voltage to about 17V for hold-in. Same with the failsafe waveguide relays.

I keep the relay supply totally separate from the masthead "ground" and only connect it through a resistor to ground at the shack end, so any switching spikes don't have a common path with the sensitive electronics, although the mosfet switches are slugged so the di/dt is well controlled and the spike-eating TVS diodes and snubbers don't have much to do.

Neil G4DBN

On 30/10/2020 20:28, KENT BRITAIN wrote:
I have several Transco 'Y's in my EME system for nearly 40 years that do pull quite
a bit of power.   I power them with a voltage doubler circuit.   No Load Voltage is high, several volts
above rating.  They pull in quickly.  Then voltage drops to about 1/2 rating.  Enough to hold
them in but much less heating. Has worked for almost 40 years.  Kent

On Friday, October 30, 2020, 3:23:29 PM CDT, Nick Gregory G0HIK via groups.io <nickg0hik@...> wrote:


Yes Ben,

My relays pull current all the time, I was wondering if damage might occur leaving power on them. Although using the pulse circuit leaves 12v on them it's half the current. I presume there will be no long term damage to the relay by doing that.
I've had several Chinese little boosters of different configuration. All have either failed on power up or soon after, maybe I've just been unlucky. But using them with no tell tale interface to inhibit TX is a recipe for damage to an LNA from my experience.
I've found in my stock of bits some nice little PCB mounted DC/DC modules 12v in and +/- 15v out, I found that using it at 30v is overloading the little device, but the relay pulls in nicely on 15v and it's well within the power draw of the unit too.


Re: Now for latching relays ...

Andy G4JNT
 

Deep Sigh........... :-( :-( :-(

That word, Chinese............
Followed by useless / failed / fake or some such word

The Simple Switcher family of ICs are so easy to use, just a handful of components and you're there.   Just look at teh dat asheet and follow their instructions.



On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 20:23, Nick Gregory G0HIK via groups.io <nickg0hik=googlemail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yes Ben,

My relays pull current all the time, I was wondering if damage might occur leaving power on them. Although using the pulse circuit leaves 12v on them it's half the current. I presume there will be no long term damage to the relay by doing that.
I've had several Chinese little boosters of different configuration. All have either failed on power up or soon after, maybe I've just been unlucky. But using them with no tell tale interface to inhibit TX is a recipe for damage to an LNA from my experience.
I've found in my stock of bits some nice little PCB mounted DC/DC modules 12v in and +/- 15v out, I found that using it at 30v is overloading the little device, but the relay pulls in nicely on 15v and it's well within the power draw of the unit too.


Nick 


G0HIK


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Now for latching relays ...

KENT BRITAIN
 

I have several Transco 'Y's in my EME system for nearly 40 years that do pull quite
a bit of power.   I power them with a voltage doubler circuit.   No Load Voltage is high, several volts
above rating.  They pull in quickly.  Then voltage drops to about 1/2 rating.  Enough to hold
them in but much less heating. Has worked for almost 40 years.  Kent

On Friday, October 30, 2020, 3:23:29 PM CDT, Nick Gregory G0HIK via groups.io <nickg0hik@...> wrote:


Yes Ben,

My relays pull current all the time, I was wondering if damage might occur leaving power on them. Although using the pulse circuit leaves 12v on them it's half the current. I presume there will be no long term damage to the relay by doing that.
I've had several Chinese little boosters of different configuration. All have either failed on power up or soon after, maybe I've just been unlucky. But using them with no tell tale interface to inhibit TX is a recipe for damage to an LNA from my experience.
I've found in my stock of bits some nice little PCB mounted DC/DC modules 12v in and +/- 15v out, I found that using it at 30v is overloading the little device, but the relay pulls in nicely on 15v and it's well within the power draw of the unit too.


Nick 


G0HIK


Re: Now for latching relays ...

Nick Gregory G0HIK
 

Yes Ben,

My relays pull current all the time, I was wondering if damage might occur leaving power on them. Although using the pulse circuit leaves 12v on them it's half the current. I presume there will be no long term damage to the relay by doing that.
I've had several Chinese little boosters of different configuration. All have either failed on power up or soon after, maybe I've just been unlucky. But using them with no tell tale interface to inhibit TX is a recipe for damage to an LNA from my experience.
I've found in my stock of bits some nice little PCB mounted DC/DC modules 12v in and +/- 15v out, I found that using it at 30v is overloading the little device, but the relay pulls in nicely on 15v and it's well within the power draw of the unit too.


Nick 


G0HIK


Re: 10Ghz last night

john pieniadz
 

David: thanks for the 2 mount ideas, loved the simplicity. I am a retired comms engineer and always over engineer things, worked for the space warfare command and that is the way uncle sam wanted things. I built a mount years ago  to rotate and elevate 4 cushcraft 148-20's and by time I was done with 1/4" aluminum, hardware, cast housings for thrust and roller bearings, with 2 linear actuators, poles for H frame it ended up weighing  more than I wanted to be in the air with, but on ground mount it worked well, which is where it stayed till I sold it.
john AK4MW


On Fri, Oct 30, 2020 at 9:18 AM DAVID G4ASR via groups.io <g4asr=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
Ben,

Here's something to consider .... 

http://www.bigskyspaces.com/w7gj/HingedMount.pdf


Re: Surveyors tripod thread

militaryoperator
 

Thanks Clint.

Off to the shed. 

Ben

-
Sent: Fri, 30 Oct 2020 12:25
Subject: Re: [UKMicrowaves] Surveyors tripod thread


On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 12:04, militaryoperator via groups.io <Military1944=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
What was the thread on the locking screw on these surveyors tripods?

Need to start making the mount for it. 

Ben


--
Clint. M0UAW IO83


Re: 10Ghz last night

militaryoperator
 

Subject: Re: [UKMicrowaves] 10Ghz last night

Ben,
Here's something to consider .... 
http://www.bigskyspaces.com/w7gj/HingedMount.pdf
_._,_._,_

I like that David. Indeed, if you make the front of the bottom bracket slightly lower than back you could cover -1 or 2deg to + a few deg. One of those actuators mounted vertically could be used to move it. 

Interesting. 

cheers, Ben


Re: 10Ghz last night

DAVID G4ASR
 

Ben,

Here's something to consider .... 

http://www.bigskyspaces.com/w7gj/HingedMount.pdf


Re: AVANTEK Amplifier Module

Paul Randall G3NJV
 

Probably a rather obvious suggestion but does that label hide a screw or two?
Paul


Re: Surveyors tripod thread

Clint Sharp <cjaysharp@...>
 


On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 12:04, militaryoperator via groups.io <Military1944=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
What was the thread on the locking screw on these surveyors tripods?

Need to start making the mount for it. 

Ben



--
Clint. M0UAW IO83

No trees were harmed in the sending of this mail. However, a large number of electrons were greatly inconvenienced.


Surveyors tripod thread

militaryoperator
 

What was the thread on the locking screw on these surveyors tripods?

Need to start making the mount for it. 

Ben


Re: Commercially made Yagi for 2.3 & 3.4GHz

Stuart G1ZAR
 

Andy.
for 2.3 GHz portable I use the WIMO /SHF antennas 40 element Yagi.
https://www.wimo.com/en/antennas/vhf-uhf-shf-antennas/stationary-directional-antennas-yagi-x-quad/shf-1340
They make longer ones, but I prefer one that will fit in the car complete.

I also have a shorter antenna from Antennas-Amplifiers which was purchased just for mountain topping
https://www.antennas-amplifiers.com/13cm-antenna
OK, but designed for vertical polarisation, so you would have to change the mounting.

Stuart - G1ZAR


Re: AVANTEK Amplifier Module

Gordon REASON
 

Hi Doug ..... firstly  , assume nothing .

Accept what you know  ...... and what you do not know .

It looks a little aincient (?) , and I can't say that I've ever taken an avantek amp apart .........

You have to very carefully and gently , remove a lid/cover , to enable a visual , and then an electronic check .

A 15 dBm input , I would'nt expect , to cause any damage ...........

It's more likely that an intermittant DC connection would .

However , get the lid off , take a good long look , and come back to us ......... as I'm sure that we are all wanting to help .

On 30 October 2020 at 03:47 DougF VK4OE <uwaves@...> wrote:

Greetings to all readers!

I am wondering please if someone reading this message has practical experience with the internal construction and circuitry of AVANTEK microwave amplifier modules such as the one whose picture I am attaching to this message.

Following an eBay transaction four weeks ago, an AVANTEK 3A80-1782 amplifier module arrived in the mail this week.  Some scant technical information about it showing that it had been tested satisfactorily at an earlier time was supplied, but it is not exhaustive information.  Briefly, this amplifier is labeled for use over the 12 to 18 GHz range and the information supplied with it indicated that I should expect to get +15 dBm output power. It is 3¼" long by 1¼" wide and the label says +12VDC.

Before testing it, I mounted it on a heat sink, which had been recommended.  That done, the simple initial test was to discover that it was drawing 270 mA at +12V which seemed about right.

Next, I introduced an input signal on 14 GHz at -10 dBm and that produced an output power of about +15 dBm, after which I quickly found that it would deliver close to +17 dBm saturated output power from about -6 dBm input.  Both of those measurements seemed about right for such a module.  I recorded similar good results at 15 GHz and 16 GHz.

At that point I became distracted for a couple of minutes by something outside the "shack" and when I returned the output power meter was showing nothing and the current being drawn was now only 2 mA.  I was, of course, surprised and disappointed, particularly in that I wasn't, in my view, pushing it hard.

Removing and reinstating the DC supply has not restored things, neither has waiting several minutes.  It still draws only 2 mA.

Question 1:  Do you know or have some insight into the mode of failure that may have occurred here, and a possible way to fix it?

Question 2:  Having removed the heat sink and removed the eight screws holding the back plate of the module, the back plate does not want to "let go".  It appears to be firmly attached to something under the 'output' end of the amplifier module, but there are no more screws to remove.  Is someone on this list familiar with the way such amplifier modules are constructed internally, and who could give me some advice please?

Question 3:  Should I just regard the module as a 'write off'' and don't wast time trying to repair it?

What do folk think?

Cheers and 73,

--Doug Friend, VK4OE.

p.s.  I have already posted a similar message on the W1MBA microwave reflector but no-one with the experience I'm describing has emerged.  Apologies to those who have read a similar message there.....


 


 


Re: AVANTEK Amplifier Module

Robin Szemeti - G1YFG
 

If I had to guess, I would say the being driven hard has blown a resistor or inductor feeding the FET.   In my experience, when FET's fail, they tend to fail short circuit, so I think it more likely the higher current of being driven hard has popped a surface mount resistor or possibly an inductor.  I doubt the active device itself has failed, it will be almost certainly the simple DC circuitry feeding it.

You are probably going to be able to fix it, if you can get it open, I'd give it a go.



On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 03:47, DougF VK4OE <uwaves@...> wrote:

Greetings to all readers!

I am wondering please if someone reading this message has practical experience with the internal construction and circuitry of AVANTEK microwave amplifier modules such as the one whose picture I am attaching to this message.

Following an eBay transaction four weeks ago, an AVANTEK 3A80-1782 amplifier module arrived in the mail this week.  Some scant technical information about it showing that it had been tested satisfactorily at an earlier time was supplied, but it is not exhaustive information.  Briefly, this amplifier is labeled for use over the 12 to 18 GHz range and the information supplied with it indicated that I should expect to get +15 dBm output power. It is 3¼" long by 1¼" wide and the label says +12VDC.

Before testing it, I mounted it on a heat sink, which had been recommended.  That done, the simple initial test was to discover that it was drawing 270 mA at +12V which seemed about right.

Next, I introduced an input signal on 14 GHz at -10 dBm and that produced an output power of about +15 dBm, after which I quickly found that it would deliver close to +17 dBm saturated output power from about -6 dBm input.  Both of those measurements seemed about right for such a module.  I recorded similar good results at 15 GHz and 16 GHz.

At that point I became distracted for a couple of minutes by something outside the "shack" and when I returned the output power meter was showing nothing and the current being drawn was now only 2 mA.  I was, of course, surprised and disappointed, particularly in that I wasn't, in my view, pushing it hard.

Removing and reinstating the DC supply has not restored things, neither has waiting several minutes.  It still draws only 2 mA.

Question 1:  Do you know or have some insight into the mode of failure that may have occurred here, and a possible way to fix it?

Question 2:  Having removed the heat sink and removed the eight screws holding the back plate of the module, the back plate does not want to "let go".  It appears to be firmly attached to something under the 'output' end of the amplifier module, but there are no more screws to remove.  Is someone on this list familiar with the way such amplifier modules are constructed internally, and who could give me some advice please?

Question 3:  Should I just regard the module as a 'write off'' and don't wast time trying to repair it?

What do folk think?

Cheers and 73,

--Doug Friend, VK4OE.

p.s.  I have already posted a similar message on the W1MBA microwave reflector but no-one with the experience I'm describing has emerged.  Apologies to those who have read a similar message there.....


--
Robin Szemeti - G1YFG


AVANTEK Amplifier Module

DougF VK4OE
 

Greetings to all readers!

I am wondering please if someone reading this message has practical experience with the internal construction and circuitry of AVANTEK microwave amplifier modules such as the one whose picture I am attaching to this message.

Following an eBay transaction four weeks ago, an AVANTEK 3A80-1782 amplifier module arrived in the mail this week.  Some scant technical information about it showing that it had been tested satisfactorily at an earlier time was supplied, but it is not exhaustive information.  Briefly, this amplifier is labeled for use over the 12 to 18 GHz range and the information supplied with it indicated that I should expect to get +15 dBm output power. It is 3¼" long by 1¼" wide and the label says +12VDC.

Before testing it, I mounted it on a heat sink, which had been recommended.  That done, the simple initial test was to discover that it was drawing 270 mA at +12V which seemed about right.

Next, I introduced an input signal on 14 GHz at -10 dBm and that produced an output power of about +15 dBm, after which I quickly found that it would deliver close to +17 dBm saturated output power from about -6 dBm input.  Both of those measurements seemed about right for such a module.  I recorded similar good results at 15 GHz and 16 GHz.

At that point I became distracted for a couple of minutes by something outside the "shack" and when I returned the output power meter was showing nothing and the current being drawn was now only 2 mA.  I was, of course, surprised and disappointed, particularly in that I wasn't, in my view, pushing it hard.

Removing and reinstating the DC supply has not restored things, neither has waiting several minutes.  It still draws only 2 mA.

Question 1:  Do you know or have some insight into the mode of failure that may have occurred here, and a possible way to fix it?

Question 2:  Having removed the heat sink and removed the eight screws holding the back plate of the module, the back plate does not want to "let go".  It appears to be firmly attached to something under the 'output' end of the amplifier module, but there are no more screws to remove.  Is someone on this list familiar with the way such amplifier modules are constructed internally, and who could give me some advice please?

Question 3:  Should I just regard the module as a 'write off'' and don't wast time trying to repair it?

What do folk think?

Cheers and 73,

--Doug Friend, VK4OE.

p.s.  I have already posted a similar message on the W1MBA microwave reflector but no-one with the experience I'm describing has emerged.  Apologies to those who have read a similar message there.....


Re: 2320 PA Modifications?

Colin Ranson
 

Hi Ben,

 

I use an Amphenol 316-10744-3 24v..... non latching,  or similar are sometimes available on e-bay.

 

I also use one on my 2m/70cm and 23cm pallets.   I came across a few in an closed down Home Office TX site.

 

 

Best regards

 

Colin de G8LBS

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: militaryoperator via groups.io
Sent: 29 October 2020 19:40
To: UKMicrowaves@groups.io
Subject: Re: [UKMicrowaves] 2320 PA Modifications?

 

 

 

What are folk using for their antenna switching on these amps? 

 

I only have SMA type which I think are not capable of 150W or so at 2.3Ghz, or at least not advisable?

 

Ben














--------------------------------------

Curator, Owner and Display coordinator

Military Wireless Museum

Kidderminster, UK.

 

This message was meant for the recipient

Any likeness to persons living or dead is odd

---------------------------------------

 


Re: Now for latching relays ...

Pete - GM4BYF
 

I use an arduino set up to drive latching relays. Many latching relays do draw current after being latched, so a pulse is needed - otherwise they can eventually fail. Arduino relays are cheap and very effective. You can set up the length of pulse very easily by programming.

73
Pete GM4BYF
On 29/10/20 19:46, Steve G4HTZ via groups.io wrote:

I use these from w6PQL for driving the latching 26ghz latching 12v  relays that were ...maybe still available on eBay ...can be used with 24/28v relays as well 

http://www.w6pql.com/latching_relay_driver.htm


Steve G4HTZ 
JO01JN60
Great Wakering, Essex 
24ghz 1.8w 80cm dish 

also known to be active occasionally on 70cms DATV 


--
vry 73
Pete GM4BYF


Re: Now for latching relays ...

Steve G4HTZ
 

I use these from w6PQL for driving the latching 26ghz latching 12v  relays that were ...maybe still available on eBay ...can be used with 24/28v relays as well 

http://www.w6pql.com/latching_relay_driver.htm


Steve G4HTZ 
JO01JN60
Great Wakering, Essex 
24ghz 1.8w 80cm dish 

also known to be active occasionally on 70cms DATV 


Re: 2320 PA Modifications?

militaryoperator
 



What are folk using for their antenna switching on these amps? 

I only have SMA type which I think are not capable of 150W or so at 2.3Ghz, or at least not advisable?

Ben














--------------------------------------
Curator, Owner and Display coordinator
Military Wireless Museum
Kidderminster, UK.

This message was meant for the recipient
Any likeness to persons living or dead is odd
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