Date   

Re: farnell psu

ken ferguson <ken_ferguson@...>
 

model number is L30/5 hope this helps

ken




========================================
Message Received: Sep 01 2007, 08:38 PM
From: "Geoff Blake"
To: ukmicrowaves@...
Cc:
Subject: Re: [ukmicrowaves] farnell psu

On Sat, 1 Sep 2007, Mike Willis wrote:

> What?

Mike, surely it should be 'which'.

Ken, there are many, from lab types to SMPSU's.

Geoff

> kenneth ferguson wrote:
> >
> > has anyone got a copy of the farnell stableised psu they could copy for
> > me.thanks ken
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>

--
Geoff Blake G8GNZ located near Chelmsford, Essex, U.K.
Please reply to: geoff(at)palaemon(dot)demon(dot)co(dot)uk
Using Linux on Intel & Linux or NetBSD on Sun Sparc platforms

Please avoid sending me Word or PowerPoint attachments.
See <http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html>
----------------------------------------------------------

This E-mail and any attachment(s) are strictly confidential
and is intended solely for the addressee(s). If you are not the
intended recipient please notify at)palaemon.co.uk>
and the sender by return and permanently delete the message.

You may not disclose, forward or copy this E-mail or any of its
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Re: farnell psu

ken ferguson <ken_ferguson@...>
 

Guys please dont scoff 8) the farnell model number is L30/5 I hope this helps .

thanks

ken




========================================
Message Received: Sep 01 2007, 08:38 PM
From: "Geoff Blake"
To: ukmicrowaves@...
Cc:
Subject: Re: [ukmicrowaves] farnell psu

On Sat, 1 Sep 2007, Mike Willis wrote:

> What?

Mike, surely it should be 'which'.

Ken, there are many, from lab types to SMPSU's.

Geoff

> kenneth ferguson wrote:
> >
> > has anyone got a copy of the farnell stableised psu they could copy for
> > me.thanks ken
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>

--
Geoff Blake G8GNZ located near Chelmsford, Essex, U.K.
Please reply to: geoff(at)palaemon(dot)demon(dot)co(dot)uk
Using Linux on Intel & Linux or NetBSD on Sun Sparc platforms

Please avoid sending me Word or PowerPoint attachments.
See <http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html>
----------------------------------------------------------

This E-mail and any attachment(s) are strictly confidential
and is intended solely for the addressee(s). If you are not the
intended recipient please notify at)palaemon.co.uk>
and the sender by return and permanently delete the message.

You may not disclose, forward or copy this E-mail or any of its
attachments to any third party without the prior consent of the
sender.

----------------------------------------------------------


Re: farnell psu

Geoff Blake <geoff@...>
 

On Sat, 1 Sep 2007, Mike Willis wrote:

What?
Mike, surely it should be 'which'.

Ken, there are many, from lab types to SMPSU's.


Geoff


kenneth ferguson wrote:

has anyone got a copy of the farnell stableised psu they could copy for
me.thanks ken




Yahoo! Groups Links



--
Geoff Blake G8GNZ located near Chelmsford, Essex, U.K.
Please reply to: geoff(at)palaemon(dot)demon(dot)co(dot)uk
Using Linux on Intel & Linux or NetBSD on Sun Sparc platforms

Please avoid sending me Word or PowerPoint attachments.
See <http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html>
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This E-mail and any attachment(s) are strictly confidential
and is intended solely for the addressee(s). If you are not the
intended recipient please notify <postmaster(at)palaemon.co.uk>
and the sender by return and permanently delete the message.

You may not disclose, forward or copy this E-mail or any of its
attachments to any third party without the prior consent of the
sender.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Re: farnell psu

Chris G8BKE
 

Farnell make many PSU's..........which model is it?

73 de Chris G8BKE

Web Site:-
http://www.qsl.net/g8bke/index.html

has anyone got a copy of the farnell stableised psu they could copy for me.thanks ken


Re: farnell psu

Mike Willis <m.j.willis@...>
 

What?

kenneth ferguson wrote:


has anyone got a copy of the farnell stableised psu they could copy for
me.thanks ken


farnell psu

kenneth ferguson <ken_ferguson@...>
 

has anyone got a copy of the farnell stableised psu they could copy for
me.thanks ken


Re: Lidl levels

Clive Jenner <clivejenner@...>
 

Hi thanks for the suggestion Paul, I don't know why I did not think of the alternative digital level you suggested as I saw them on eBay a couple of months ago. I wonder if they use the same chip?

I am ok now as I picked up one of the digital spirit levels at another Lidl I visited this morning. Fourth time lucky!

Mind you they were not as cheap as the original price quoted on here. Such is life.

73 Clive G0PPO


Re: stripline tuning discs?

Chris Ruddy MM0KOS
 

Hi Paul

can you send me your email address for info on how to get precut
discs

Thanks MM0KOS

mm0kos at yahoo dit co dit uk


--- In ukmicrowaves@yahoogroups.com, Chris Bartram <yahoo@...> wrote:

Paul

As for actually tuning the stripline from the Imfets, I guess
the idea
locations are right at the output of the device to the track, or
at
the track positions where the bias DC lines are connected. This
particular PA has a pair of fets in parallel - is there anything
I
need to watch out for when tuning these, like the phasing of the
outputs etc? Or can I tune for maximum RF out and be happy with
that?

The location of the 'snowflakes' can, in principle, be anywhere on
the output
line, and while you are playing they will need to be able to move
over a half
(guided) wavelength along the line.

I suggest you revisit 'impedance matching with stub tuners' in the
Microwave
Handbook before you start playing...

Tuning a PA empirically is always a bit fraught!

You _will_ need to go around a loop. With modern devices, the
impedances are
likely to be reasonably similar from device to device,
particularly within
the design bandwidth. Are you using IMFETs which actually cover
the band? If
you are, you are unlikely to get more than a remarkably few
tenths of a dB
extra output by snowflaking for matching, and you should
concentrate on
getting the phase relationship right.

Were I building a two (or more) amplifier PA at 10GHz, I'd build
two separate
amplifiers, and use external hybrids with an SMA phase adjuster in
one of the
input legs to get the phase right.

If your amplifier uses IMFETs operating outside of their design
band, then I'd
optimise each amplifier individually for best performance wrt
matching, power
output and gain, while trying to keep the matching topology
similar in each
case. Only when you are happy with that should you try to combine
them.

If you do that, you'll save yourself much confused twiddling, and
probably the
cost of several damaged devices!!

I know about these things, and I have a remarkable collection of
undersized
tee-shirts to prove it! I've been there both in a work context,
and in my own
station where I use reasonably 'serious' four-amplifier PAs on
both 144 and
432 (and sometime, when I get time, will have QRO on 1296 by the
same route).

Vy 73

Chris
GW4DGU


Re: Lidl levels

pjm <pauljmarsh@...>
 

I think I will have to bit the bullet and pay top dollar. I
have found several Digital Spirit Levels on eBay at various (higher)
prices.
Hi Clive,

Also 330159990331 is worth a look - 25£ including P&P.

Measuring Range ±180°
Resolution 0.1°
Accuracy 0.1°
Response Time <1.0 second
Operating Temp. 0-45°C
Power Lithium 3V (CR2032)
Battery Life 2000 hours
Weight 120g
Size 51 x 51 x 33mm
Auto Shut Off 5 minutes
Sealing IP54

not bad at all for the price...

regards,

Paul M0EYT.


Re: Lidl levels

Clive Jenner <clivejenner@...>
 

As usual I am late on parade with this, so the Lidl's I have checked had no stock. I think I will have to bit the bullet and pay top dollar. I have found several Digital Spirit Levels on eBay at various (higher) prices. Here is one example item number 280145137881.
Good luck and 73 Clive G0PPO


Radcom 10GHz Quickstart Project and other Updates

Murray Niman <mjniman@...>
 

The article on how to quickly get started on 10GHz DX by UKuG in the
August-2007 edition of Radcom has been kindly made available for free
download on the UKuG website - http://www.microwavers.org/

If you havent looked recently, other updates include

a) Crawley Roundtable programme
b) 75GHz QSO video
c) The next Microwave Beginners Workshop at RSGB HQ!
d) Updated tables of Microwave Firsts

regards

Murray G6JYB


Re: stripline tuning discs?

Chris Bartram <yahoo@...>
 

Paul

As for actually tuning the stripline from the Imfets, I guess the idea
locations are right at the output of the device to the track, or at
the track positions where the bias DC lines are connected. This
particular PA has a pair of fets in parallel - is there anything I
need to watch out for when tuning these, like the phasing of the
outputs etc? Or can I tune for maximum RF out and be happy with that?
The location of the 'snowflakes' can, in principle, be anywhere on the output
line, and while you are playing they will need to be able to move over a half
(guided) wavelength along the line.

I suggest you revisit 'impedance matching with stub tuners' in the Microwave
Handbook before you start playing...

Tuning a PA empirically is always a bit fraught!

You _will_ need to go around a loop. With modern devices, the impedances are
likely to be reasonably similar from device to device, particularly within
the design bandwidth. Are you using IMFETs which actually cover the band? If
you are, you are unlikely to get more than a remarkably few tenths of a dB
extra output by snowflaking for matching, and you should concentrate on
getting the phase relationship right.

Were I building a two (or more) amplifier PA at 10GHz, I'd build two separate
amplifiers, and use external hybrids with an SMA phase adjuster in one of the
input legs to get the phase right.

If your amplifier uses IMFETs operating outside of their design band, then I'd
optimise each amplifier individually for best performance wrt matching, power
output and gain, while trying to keep the matching topology similar in each
case. Only when you are happy with that should you try to combine them.

If you do that, you'll save yourself much confused twiddling, and probably the
cost of several damaged devices!!

I know about these things, and I have a remarkable collection of undersized
tee-shirts to prove it! I've been there both in a work context, and in my own
station where I use reasonably 'serious' four-amplifier PAs on both 144 and
432 (and sometime, when I get time, will have QRO on 1296 by the same route).

Vy 73

Chris
GW4DGU


Re: stripline tuning discs?

pjm <pauljmarsh@...>
 

Copper tape is probably the best option if you can get it,
especially the self-adhesive stuff, but it might not be cheap!

Hi Grant, all,

I have a roll of adhesive copper tape which I have tried to use in the
past. The only down side is when you are tuning the lines, you have to
use the tape with sticky side up, or it makes it hard to move around
to peak the signal. The idea of 2 thou shim might be a good one
providing I can cut it without it curling up, this is one of the
problems I've had with the stuff before.

As for actually tuning the stripline from the Imfets, I guess the idea
locations are right at the output of the device to the track, or at
the track positions where the bias DC lines are connected. This
particular PA has a pair of fets in parallel - is there anything I
need to watch out for when tuning these, like the phasing of the
outputs etc? Or can I tune for maximum RF out and be happy with that?

regards,

Paul M0EYT.


Re: stripline tuning discs?

Chris Bartram <yahoo@...>
 

I'll second Grant's suggestion. 19mm copper tape is quite easily available
from Farnell eg. 120-8995 and not super-expensive at about £4 in short 3.66m
lengths.

It's an essential part of the RF/microwave circuit designers toolkit!

Incidentally, I don't want to be accused of unwarranted pedantry, but
_stripline_ is a transmission-line medium consisting of a conductor contained
between two groundplanes. That is fundamentally different from the
_microstripline_ (conductor above a single groundplane) medium which most
amateurs are familiar with.

One of the great attractions of stripline is that (unlike microstrip) it has a
set of design equations which can be derived unambiguously from first
principles. Although good microstrip design equations have existed for a
couple of decades, it took nearly 25years of effort by some very clever
people to get to that state...  

Although some people might (wrongly!) consider stripline something from the
1950s and '60s, the availability of low-cost multilayer PCB manufacturing and
low-loss substrate materials with processing profiles similar to that of
standard FR4 is making the use of stripline structures very attractive to
professionals once again.

Vy 73

Chris
GW4DGU


Re: stripline tuning discs?

Grant Hodgson <grant@...>
 

Paul

The technique used to tune circuits on microstrip is referred to as 'snow-flaking', and the pieces of metal don't need to be circular - they can be any shape - square, triangular, rectangular, or even snow-flake shaped...

The easiest things to use are very thin pieces of brass or copper - the thinner the better - 0.002" is good. Thin brass sheet is available from good hobby shops and can be cut with tin snips or even scissors/wire cutters - but these will soon go blunt. Or you could buy it from the sheet metal suppliers that supply the hobby market via the internet.

Copper tape is probably the best option if you can get it, especially the self-adhesive stuff, but it might not be cheap! If you only want a small amount then you can probably scrounge some - I'll have a look to see if I've got any. 1" square will make an awful lot of snowflakes.

The 'snowflakes' can be glued, although soldering is preferred.

regards

Grant

pjm wrote:

Morning all,
Has anyone seen stripline in commercial equipment that is tuned with
small metal discs, about 3mm or 4mm diameter? If so, where does one
get these? I need to tune up a PA for some EME tests, and want small
flat pieces of metal, and these must be cheap I'm sure. I guess the
answer would be to find somewhere that makes mesh out of brass, and go
and collect the punch outs...
regards,


stripline tuning discs?

pjm <pauljmarsh@...>
 

Morning all,

Has anyone seen stripline in commercial equipment that is tuned with
small metal discs, about 3mm or 4mm diameter? If so, where does one
get these? I need to tune up a PA for some EME tests, and want small
flat pieces of metal, and these must be cheap I'm sure. I guess the
answer would be to find somewhere that makes mesh out of brass, and go
and collect the punch outs...

regards,

Paul M0EYT.


Re: reverse beacons..agn

SAM JEWELL
 

A cross-band linear translator?

I see a similar argument about what is a repeater is raging in the USA, where it has implications for whether D Stars 'repeaters' are really just digital FM repeaters (or not...) and therefore have to abide by repeater planning rules.
Ho Hum.

Anyway, off to say some Hail Mary's, or summat, especially if it's a cardinal sin.



Alan Melia wrote:

Hi Sam, I am afraid you committed a cardinal sin in your message !! That was
not a "repeater" that Crawley set up on 136khz (that term has inflamatory
attractions for some) the device was a "remotely sited receiver with radio
downlinking". :-))

I see little point on worrying about the PC I ran SnagIt and ARGO on a
200MHz PII (under Win95 ) which can be picked up from the tip (er Recycling
Centre) these days. The unit ran happily cool on a 150watt PSU (I didnt have
a smaller one to try) With this operation it is probably not a disaster if
it crashes occasionally on power outages, and has to be manually reset ...a
non updated screen on the web site indicates it is down, so we dont have
everyone ripping their equipment apart. The problem with a Linux machine is
that much of this software is written for Windows and whist most will run
happily under WINE it is another layer of complexity......but I believe it
does all work.

Of course if you invoke SDR or SoftRock you require a soundcard and a more
powerful, thirsty machine. It should not be necessary to supply a wide
bandwidth so they are nice but not really necessary. At the maximum one SSB
channel is all that is required. I am sure that modern microwavers can put a
CW signal somewhere inside that even at 24GHz...... like the beacon
network....... start simple.

Depending upon the band and the bandwidth used stability is nice but not
essential. A low-level local stable source bled into the RX is a cheaper way
than GPS locking, though a system with that would be much more useful. At LF
we have the sidebands of Loran-C about every 2Hz to act as a frequency
calibrator.

http://www.qsl.net/on7yd/136khz.htm click "Software" and see "Argo Upload"
http://www.techsmith.com/order for "SnagIt" a very versatile program with
many other uses
http://www.weaksignals.com/ for Alberto's site which I am sure you know.
ARGO is the recommended "easy operating" screen waterfall Spectran is more
finicky about the soundcards

Cheers de Alan G3NYK



reverse beacons..agn

Alan Melia
 

Hi Sam, I am afraid you committed a cardinal sin in your message !! That was
not a "repeater" that Crawley set up on 136khz (that term has inflamatory
attractions for some) the device was a "remotely sited receiver with radio
downlinking". :-))

I see little point on worrying about the PC I ran SnagIt and ARGO on a
200MHz PII (under Win95 ) which can be picked up from the tip (er Recycling
Centre) these days. The unit ran happily cool on a 150watt PSU (I didnt have
a smaller one to try) With this operation it is probably not a disaster if
it crashes occasionally on power outages, and has to be manually reset ...a
non updated screen on the web site indicates it is down, so we dont have
everyone ripping their equipment apart. The problem with a Linux machine is
that much of this software is written for Windows and whist most will run
happily under WINE it is another layer of complexity......but I believe it
does all work.

Of course if you invoke SDR or SoftRock you require a soundcard and a more
powerful, thirsty machine. It should not be necessary to supply a wide
bandwidth so they are nice but not really necessary. At the maximum one SSB
channel is all that is required. I am sure that modern microwavers can put a
CW signal somewhere inside that even at 24GHz...... like the beacon
network....... start simple.

Depending upon the band and the bandwidth used stability is nice but not
essential. A low-level local stable source bled into the RX is a cheaper way
than GPS locking, though a system with that would be much more useful. At LF
we have the sidebands of Loran-C about every 2Hz to act as a frequency
calibrator.

http://www.qsl.net/on7yd/136khz.htm click "Software" and see "Argo Upload"
http://www.techsmith.com/order for "SnagIt" a very versatile program with
many other uses
http://www.weaksignals.com/ for Alberto's site which I am sure you know.
ARGO is the recommended "easy operating" screen waterfall Spectran is more
finicky about the soundcards


Cheers de Alan G3NYK


DFCW-I Soundcard Generating Software

Andy Talbot <andy.g4jnt@...>
 


Inverse Beacons

Chris Bartram <yahoo@...>
 

Quite a lot of the work currently being done by members of the uWSDR group
would be applicable to putting inverse beacons on the air.

<uwsdr.berlios.de>

In particular, the software, written by Jonathan, G4KLX, is already being used
with Softrocks (both receive and transceive versions). It is currently
available for windoze, MacOSX, and Linux platforms. I've already suggested to
the uWSDR development group that it might be possible to add software modules
to allow its use as an inverse beacon.

The hardware is also developing, but the project is suffering from the few of
us involved in both hardware and firmware development all having fairly
demanding jobs, and relatively little time to devote to the project. We would
still welcome offers of help with development from anyone with the relevant
skills. In particular we need more people with experience of RF/Microwave
and baseband circuit design. PCB and documentation people would also be
welcome.

uWSDR is releasing all of the intellectual property we're generating under
Open Source licences, hopefully for the greater good of the Amater Radio
Community.

Incidentally, my interest in the inverse beacon concept comes from one of my
other amateur radio interests - extreme range DXing on 144MHz. It seems
likely that inverse beacons will be used widely in the 'beaconisation' (OK, I
know it's a horrible word!) of the Atlantic basin, an area which is rapidly
becoming the new North Sea for VHF'ers.

Vy 73

Chris
GW4DGU