Date   

Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Questions: I, II, III, IV

A. Tullia Scholastica, consul
 

A. Tullia Scholastica M. Furio Purpureoni S.P.D. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "M. Furius Purpureo"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 12 2021 10:22:50PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Questions: I, II, III, IV

Salve A. Tullia Scholastica,

I think apart from family you may be the only other that understands rhinosinusitis, most friends think it's just a cold it'd nothing, or an allergy, I hope I haven't developed an allergy to my feline fur kids, though I know already I will require surgery and the waiting list will be super long now the NHS is under pressure, plus it's coming up to winter the worst time to be hospitalised. I worry it's more risk of contracting the Delta-variant which is rife here.


ATS:  Sorry for the delay; been busy registering new students; the slower courses began yesterday, and my normal fast-paced one on the Ides.  Each registration requires several communications, and my box is stuffed with them.  Just did a lot of mailbox cleaning, but there are those who refuse to prove that they have the necessary text, or who send the wrong information, etc., etc., which means I can't file those applications as they are in limbo.  

 I understand a lot about sinusitus, etc.; I've had two sinus surgeries and won our family's allergy lottery.  I also had a long-lasting, apparently autoimmune, disease featuring intense rhinorrhea at regular intervals which necessitated those surgeries.  At least they did not occur during a plague, when one should avoid hospitals.  

Cats are highly allergenic, but it seems that there may be something which helps owners who are allergic to their pets.  Of course the cats know who doesn't like them and who is allergic to them, and they cling to those people...



The antihistamines are something. It's this chronic coughing that is a problem now, I'm bruised and probably have a mild hernia as I felt some rip a few weeks ago attempting fitness sessions which I now struggle with, shortness of breath and so tired all the time and dizzy.

Nefertum licks my face each morning and has become really insistent and mirrors my face as I attempt to breath via my mouth, I can only hold my breath for so long, he grabs my cheeks and pulls my face back to continue until I start having a panic attack, can't cover or block my mouth as my nose is completely blocked, no sense of smell or taste and eating is un-relaxing mindful not to inhale food, and affects breathing and speech. I wonder if Nefertum senses something which fills me with dread, it's not like him to be so intense.


ATS: Probably kitty does.  


 I won't know until I see my doctor and currently waiting as it's all queues now. I have had for the first time wheezing and struggle to get air as if breathing through a straw, usually at night so stay awake until wee hours as I have thoughts my breathing will just stop. Have to consciously breath as if a weight on my chest and use breathing techniques during meditation to keep calm and prevent a panic attack, my sister mentioned asthma. So have a list for my doctor. 

I had my first jab of Oxford AstraZeneca in late March, then 10 or 12 weeks later the second jab, I didn't get the e-mail until early July which by then this rhinosinusitis and respiratory issues started in June getting worse, with the random hot flushes and chills I postponed until better, except I'm no different after two months. I've self-tested several times and all came out negative except the last one which was void as it's difficult and painful swabbing the nasal and messed it up. The private companies involved with such kits are clearly profiteering with this pandemic.

I couldn't get understood over the telephone to my surgery to book the second jab, but can take myself to the local vaccine set up with my card and just get it done.

I think all the stress and anxiety with life in general, personal circumstances, Brexit consequences, COVID-19 and variants have finally got to me. I just feel exhausted. Sorry for such long reply and to A. Iulius Paterculus for ruining the quiz after all his time and effort, and for all. I feel embarrassed. I've never made such a mistake like that before. I must have meant to type in the private e-mail address and title and instead replied, yet still forgot to amend. I only realised when I saw your reply. 



ATS: I had hoped that one of the aediles would see it and mention that fact; I don't like to intervene. Apparently the quiz itself wasn't ruined, though; your part in it, however, was.  



I pray and petition to the Dii Consentes for your and everyone's good health and favourable fortunes and protection in this changed world.


ATS:  Gratias!  I hope you are feeling much better and that someone will get to the bottom of your illness(es).  I have a long history of getting little help from the medical establishment; they even ignored a life-threatening illness for almost a year.  Makes one wonder if one should consult a witch doctor...one in student health (where a friend was treated by a guy who had never crossed the threshold of a med school, but was addressed as 'doctor') told me I had no allergies, but when a real allergist tested me, I had dozens of red spots on my arms--twice.  I'm glad that those have abated as I got older; as the good allergist said, it's one advantage of that.  I can even visit houses with resident felines now...



Vale


M. Furius Purpureo

Vale! 



On Mon, 13 Sep 2021, 01:58 A. Tullia Scholastica, consul, <flavia@...> wrote:
A. Tullia Scholastica M. Furio Purpureoni S.P.D. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "M. Furius Purpureo"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 12 2021 7:33:38PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Questions: I, II, III, IV

Salve A. Tullia Scholastica,

Oh my gods, I'm so sorry and apologies to everyone involved. I meant to delete and re-type in the private e-mail address responding via the mobile phone. I don't know how I managed that. I must admit the antihistamines and what not for the rhinosinusitis and respiratory have knocked me for six. 


ATS:  I have a long acquaintance with antihistamines cum sinusitis and their activity, so know what you mean.  Replying to the ML, etc., in certamina is a common error, however, often done without benefit of medicines which are sometimes soporific, except when one wants them to be just that, and which don't always stop the symptoms. 


Have felt rough for just over two months now, which is why I've been quieter than usual. I have postponed the second jab of Oxford AstraZeneca because of this. 

ATS:  Hope you feel better.  Do you have a doctor?  A visit might be a good idea.  Don't postpone those jabs!  They are urgent!  Too many people feel that their 'rights' involve the right to commit murder by germ warfare; everyone who thinks otherwise should get what some here call a 'Fauci ouchie.'  My great-grandmother neighbor, many years my senior, has yet to get jabbed...

I shouldn't have taken part perhaps. 

I'm sorry to you and all. 

ATS:  Apology accepted; hope the aediles will do the same.  Paterculus keeps very, very odd hours, getting up when normal humans are asleep, and asleep when we are awake.  

Vale

M. Furius Purpureo   

Vale! 

On Sun, 12 Sep 2021, 19:17 A. Tullia Scholastica, consul, <flavia@...> wrote:
A. Tullia Scholastica M. Furio Purpureoni sal.  

Unfortunately, it seems you have been disqualified by posting to a public address rather than the private one specified in the questions--and moreover have likely disqualified any others who replied.  Generally we require certamen answers to be sent privately to an address specified in the question posts; replying to the ML or any public list automatically disqualifies the poster.  

Vale. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "M. Furius Purpureo"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 12 2021 1:00:39PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Questions: I, II, III, IV

Optime salve A. Iulius Paterculus,

A1: Scotland northern part of Great Britain.

A2: The Battle of Mons Graupius, lead by the general Gnaeus Iulius Agricola.

A3: Publius Cornelius Tacitus refers to the chieftain Calgacus.

A4: When the Romans abandoned Inchtuthil during redeployments the emperor Domitian reigned.

Cura, ut valeas

M. Furius Purpureo



On Sun, 12 Sep 2021, 11:54 A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis, <arthur.f.waite@...> wrote:
A. Iulius Paterculus omnibus in foro s.p.d.
   For the fourth day of our online Ludi here is the fourth question
in our Caledonia quiz:
   4. During the reign of which emperor did the Roman army abandon
their fort at Inchtuthil (1 point)?
   Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum" in the subject line. The deadline
for all responses will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday, September
17th. Please do not share the answers prior to this deadline, as it
will lead to disqualification.
    Valete.

P.S. For those who have not yet had a chance to answer them, the first
three questions are:
1. What modern country shares roughly the same territory as Caledonia (1 point)?
2. In A.D. 82, the Romans first occupied part of Caledonia following
what decisive battle (2 points)? Which general led the Roman forces to
this victory (2 points)?
3. What Caledonian leader is quoted making a speech by the historian
Tacitus (1 point)?






Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Chariot Race

Cn. Cornelius Lentulus
 

Cn. Lentulus A. Iulio aedili et contestantibus D. Aurelio, D. Fabricio, M. Martianio sal.

Io Ludi Romani! Wow, a rare victory for me! I often participate, but usually with terrible results. I am happy! My salutes to the second best, D. Aurelius Ingeniarius and to the other racers!

Thank you, aedilis, for conducting the virtual circenses.

Valete, io Ludi Romani!
CN. LENTVLVS


Il domenica 19 settembre 2021, 20:09:10 CEST, A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis <arthur.f.waite@...> ha scritto:


Salvete omnes,
  The crowds are again gathered in the hippodrome in expectation of
another day of excitement. The stone seating near the front is packed
with senators, and other familiar faces are visible higher in the
stands as well. Everyone looks exhilarated, though whether it is from
the prospect that their favoured teams will be victorious or simply
the pleasure of gathering in the fresh air and sunshine is hard to
say.
  Now the charioteers are announced, one at a time. The first to
arrive is Celsus Vulso, driving Corona Obsidionalis. The green-tinted
chariot and veteran driver draw cheers of recognition of fans of
Factio Præsina, and even a few grudging claps from some partisans of
Veneta, who came to admire the spirit shown by Celsus when he was
driving for them. D. Aurelius Ingenarius, sponsor for this chariot,
shouts down to his driver, "Don't hesitate. Speed at all costs."
  The next chariot is called "The Ultros", driven by Ptolemaíos of
Argos. Ptolemaios is a  swarthy man with almost shoulder-length black
hair, a full beard, and moustache. He wears armour with crimson
pteruges, one of the signs that he drives for Factio Russata. After,
the fans of the Reds have had a chance to cheer their new recruit, his
sponsor, D. Fabricus Avitus, who had escorted Ptolemaíos onto the
field, quietly shakes his hand before climbing into the stands and
taking a seat a little behind where Ingeniarius is sitting.
  Third announced among those contending in this race is Barinthus,
driving Blue Max. Fans of Veneta erupt into extended applause for this
courageous Celt, who has represented their faction on the racetrack
for more than ten years, and for the chariot itself, which has
performed well for the other driver sponsored by M. Martianus Lupus,
Ursinus.
  Finally, Dorothea is announced, along with her current chariot, Nova
Roma. Russata again cheers, even more enthusiastically than before,
for both have proven themselves in the past. Celsus Vulso and
Barinthus both look at this last racer warily, having contended with
her clever driving and sarcastic wit in the past. She is fairly short,
with brown hair and black eyes. Cn. Cornelius Lentulus is her sponsor.
  The four chariots are released at once from the starting stalls.
Dorothea gets a head start early on through energetic use of the whip,
but Barinthus and Blue Max quickly catch up, so the two are side by
side. Corona Obsidionalis and The Ultros are hanging back a little, as
if their drivers are conserving the horses' energy for something
ahead.
  Halfway through the first lap, Barinthus manages to get a slight
lead on Dorothea, with the other two chariots moments behind. As they
go into the first curve, Dorothea passes close by the central barrier:
a dangerous tactic, but one that gives her enough extra speed to
regain the lead. Barinthus declines to do the same, but both
Ptolemaios and Celsus employ this technique successfully as well,
leaving Barinthus to catch back up with the others in the next
straight section of track.
  "If you want to play safe, take up latrunculi: that's no way to win
in the circus," shouts Dorothea back at the champion of the Blues, as
she heads into the second lap.
  Goaded by these words, Barinthus drives his team faster and faster.
Momentarily, it seems he may overtake everyone, but one of his horses
trips on an unseen pebble, causing Blue Max to lose balance and crash
to the side. Barinthus manages to cut himself free of the reins in
time to avoid injury, and staggers off on the track, seeming only a
little dizzy from the incident.
  All three remaining charioteers continue their strategy of picking
up speed on the curves. It works for Nova Roma, but Corona
Obsidionalis and The Ultros are so neck and neck, that the tactic puts
both in essentially the same place. The resulting jostling costs the
speed going into the third and fourth laps. At the start of the fifth
it actually sends The Ultros crashing into the spina. Its charioteer,
Ptolemaíos, is well protected and seems pretty tough (rumour has it he
was a hoplite back in Argos): he'll be fine. The Ultos, on the other
hand, will need serious repair.
  Without the direct interference, Celsus Vulso closes the gap with
Dorothea a bit with each lap, but Nova Roma still has a lead of about
a Roman foot when the race ends.
Results:
1st - Nova Roma (Cn. Cornelius Lentulus)
2nd - Corona Obsidionalis (D. Aurelius Ingeniarius)
  Valete,
    A. Iulius Paterculus






Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

A. Tullia Scholastica, consul
 

A. Tullia Scholastica cos. Latinistaque C. Aurelio Paullo S.P.D. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "C. Aurelius Paullus"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 19 2021 9:57:24PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

G. Aurelius Paullus A. Iulio Paterculo SPD

Thankyou for your correction to my Latin. It is much appreciated. We learn from our mistakes.


A. Tullia Scholastica:  Indeed we do.  I am a senior Latinist, and corrected your errors.  Paterculus does know some Latin, but did not correct your errors, partly because he is up very early, and probably was asleep at the time you wrote.  

Vale

Vale!  

On Mon, Sep 20, 2021 at 10:39 AM A. Tullia Scholastica, consul <flavia@...> wrote:
A. Tullia Scholastica C. Aurelio Paullo S.P.D. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "C. Aurelius Paullus"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 19 2021 8:18:49PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

G. Aurelius Paullus A. Iulio Paterculo SPD

Benigne dicis. Ludum fructus sum et spero alius erit.

ATS:  If I may emend this...'ludo fructus sum et spero alium fore.'   'Fruor' is one of five verbs which govern the ablative; spero tends to take a future infinitive, and its object must be accusative.  



Thank you. I enjoyed the competition and I hope there will be another.

Vale

Vale! 


On Mon, Sep 20, 2021 at 5:50 AM A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis <arthur.f.waite@...> wrote:
Salvete omnes,
  Below you will find the answers and results of the latest instalment of Ipse Dixit, composed by my honourable colleague, Ædilis Curulis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus:

ITEM ONE
GLADIATOR IN ARENA CONSILIVM CAPIT

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. The gladiator takes his decision in the arena. (Literal) . Score is 2 points.
2. Who wrote this, and where? (1 point, 1 more point for the source)

2. Lucius Annæus Seneca (Seneca the Younger). Epistulæ Morales ad Lucilius, book III, XXII, 1. Score is 1 point + 1 point for the correct source.
3. Explain in your own word the meaning of this sentence, as opposed to its translation. (3 points)

3. It is useless to worry about danger, before danger actually occurs.  In Italy we also say "bandage your head before you break it". Since the corresponding question is "interpretative", any answer along these lines is fine. Score is 3 points.


ITEM TWO
O FORTUNA, VELVT LVNA, STATV VARIABILIS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. O Fortune, like the Moon, you are changeable.

2. The original poem is anonymous. What is the title of the collection in which it appears, and when was the collection originally put together? (1 point, 1 point for the date)

2. Carmina Burana ("Songs of Benediktbauern", in Germany - the Latin name of the town was Buria.). Originally written in 1230.
3. Who wrote the most famous and most widely used musical setting of this poem? (1 point)

3. Carl Orff.
4. In the musical work mentioned in Question 3, what is the title of the section where this poem is set, and what does the title mean? (2 + 2 points)

4. Fortuna, Imperatrix Mundi ("Fortune, Empress of the World").


ITEM THREE
NEMO PROPHETA ACCEPTVS EST IN PATRIA SVA

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. No prophet is accepted in his homeland/fatherland. Correct answer scores 2 points

2. Who wrote this phrase? (1 point)

2. St. Luke, in his Gospel. (4:24). Correct answer scores 1 point.
3. Who SPOKE this phrase? (1 point)

3. Jesus. Correct answer scores 1 point
4. Explain in your own words the meaning of this phrase, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

4. People usually encounter several hardships in proving their worth, or generally in being appreciated, in the place where they were born, or in a familiar environment; by contrast, it is much easier for people to become popular or successful in other places. It is generally said about people who are not appreciated for what they do by people who are the nearest to them: relatives, colleagues, fellow citizens, fellow countrymen, friends etc. Anything along these lines, even if simpler, scores 4 points.


ITEM FOUR
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR, IUVENES DUM SUMUS

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. So/therefore let us enjoy, while we are (still) young. The correct answer scores 2 points
2. What is the title of the song from which this line is taken, and what does the title mean? (1 point each)

2. De Brevitate Vitæ. On the Shotrness of Life. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. The original song is anonymous, but who wrote the lyrics used today, which differ in several points from the original text? (2 points)

3. Christer Wilhelm (or William) Kindleben. Seneca the Younger wrote an UNRELATED treatise called De Brevitate Vitæ which does NOT include the quote. The correct answer scores 2 points, "Seneca" scores nothing.

4. This song is known as a "commercium song". What is a commercium song, and in which events is this song most commonly sung today? (2 points each)

4. A commercium song is a song to be sung at a social gathering. This song is commonly sung at graduation ceremonies in universities, colleges and high schools. The correct answers score 2 points each.

5. Please explain in your own words the meaning of the above line, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

5.Like Horace's "Carpe diem", the singer invites the listeners to enjoy life while they still can, because life itself is short. The correct answer, or anything along the same lines as this, scores 4 points.

ITEM FIVE
NAM DUO MAGNORUM VIRIDI COEUNTIA SILVA CORPORA SERPENTUM BACULI VIOLAVERAT ICTU. DEQUE VIRO FACTUS (MIRABILE) FEMINA SEPTEM EGERAT AUTUMNOS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate these lines in English as faithfully as possible and AS PROSE. (4 points).

1. Indeed he had once separated, with a blow of his staff, the bodies of tho huge snakes [mating)] in the green forest (or: in the thick of the forest). [Because of this] from the man that he was he had been, surprisingly, turned into a woman, and he had thus spent seven years. [or: seven autumns/falls]. The correct answer scores 4 points.
2. Who wrote these lines, and where? (1 point each)

2. Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), Metamprphoses, book III, lines 324-327. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. Who is the character referred to in these lines? (1 point)

3. Tiresias. The correct answer scores 1 point.

4. The same character appears in a parodic version of himself in a twentieth-century poem, originally published in 1922. Who wrote it? (2 points)

4. T.S. Eliot (The Waste Land, Section 3) . The correct answer scores 2 points
5. A rock song, published in 1973, quotes yet again the same character and again in a parodic version; it also quotes some lines from the poem referred to in Question 4. What is the title of this song? (3 points)

5. The Cinema Show, by Genesis. ("Take another trip back with Father Tiresias...") The correct answer scores 3 points.


FINAL STANDINGS
First place: GAIUS CLAUDIUS BARBATUS - 46 points - WINNER OF THE GAME
Second place: AULUS SCRIBONIUS NASICA - 39 points

Third place: GAIUS AURELIUS PAULLUS - 14 points


   Optime valete,

      A. Iulius Paterculus


Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

C. Aurelius Paullus
 

G. Aurelius Paullus A. Iulio Paterculo SPD

Thankyou for your correction to my Latin. It is much appreciated. We learn from our mistakes.

Vale

On Mon, Sep 20, 2021 at 10:39 AM A. Tullia Scholastica, consul <flavia@...> wrote:
A. Tullia Scholastica C. Aurelio Paullo S.P.D. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "C. Aurelius Paullus"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 19 2021 8:18:49PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

G. Aurelius Paullus A. Iulio Paterculo SPD

Benigne dicis. Ludum fructus sum et spero alius erit.

ATS:  If I may emend this...'ludo fructus sum et spero alium fore.'   'Fruor' is one of five verbs which govern the ablative; spero tends to take a future infinitive, and its object must be accusative.  



Thank you. I enjoyed the competition and I hope there will be another.

Vale

Vale! 


On Mon, Sep 20, 2021 at 5:50 AM A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis <arthur.f.waite@...> wrote:
Salvete omnes,
  Below you will find the answers and results of the latest instalment of Ipse Dixit, composed by my honourable colleague, Ædilis Curulis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus:

ITEM ONE
GLADIATOR IN ARENA CONSILIVM CAPIT

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. The gladiator takes his decision in the arena. (Literal) . Score is 2 points.
2. Who wrote this, and where? (1 point, 1 more point for the source)

2. Lucius Annæus Seneca (Seneca the Younger). Epistulæ Morales ad Lucilius, book III, XXII, 1. Score is 1 point + 1 point for the correct source.
3. Explain in your own word the meaning of this sentence, as opposed to its translation. (3 points)

3. It is useless to worry about danger, before danger actually occurs.  In Italy we also say "bandage your head before you break it". Since the corresponding question is "interpretative", any answer along these lines is fine. Score is 3 points.


ITEM TWO
O FORTUNA, VELVT LVNA, STATV VARIABILIS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. O Fortune, like the Moon, you are changeable.

2. The original poem is anonymous. What is the title of the collection in which it appears, and when was the collection originally put together? (1 point, 1 point for the date)

2. Carmina Burana ("Songs of Benediktbauern", in Germany - the Latin name of the town was Buria.). Originally written in 1230.
3. Who wrote the most famous and most widely used musical setting of this poem? (1 point)

3. Carl Orff.
4. In the musical work mentioned in Question 3, what is the title of the section where this poem is set, and what does the title mean? (2 + 2 points)

4. Fortuna, Imperatrix Mundi ("Fortune, Empress of the World").


ITEM THREE
NEMO PROPHETA ACCEPTVS EST IN PATRIA SVA

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. No prophet is accepted in his homeland/fatherland. Correct answer scores 2 points

2. Who wrote this phrase? (1 point)

2. St. Luke, in his Gospel. (4:24). Correct answer scores 1 point.
3. Who SPOKE this phrase? (1 point)

3. Jesus. Correct answer scores 1 point
4. Explain in your own words the meaning of this phrase, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

4. People usually encounter several hardships in proving their worth, or generally in being appreciated, in the place where they were born, or in a familiar environment; by contrast, it is much easier for people to become popular or successful in other places. It is generally said about people who are not appreciated for what they do by people who are the nearest to them: relatives, colleagues, fellow citizens, fellow countrymen, friends etc. Anything along these lines, even if simpler, scores 4 points.


ITEM FOUR
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR, IUVENES DUM SUMUS

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. So/therefore let us enjoy, while we are (still) young. The correct answer scores 2 points
2. What is the title of the song from which this line is taken, and what does the title mean? (1 point each)

2. De Brevitate Vitæ. On the Shotrness of Life. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. The original song is anonymous, but who wrote the lyrics used today, which differ in several points from the original text? (2 points)

3. Christer Wilhelm (or William) Kindleben. Seneca the Younger wrote an UNRELATED treatise called De Brevitate Vitæ which does NOT include the quote. The correct answer scores 2 points, "Seneca" scores nothing.

4. This song is known as a "commercium song". What is a commercium song, and in which events is this song most commonly sung today? (2 points each)

4. A commercium song is a song to be sung at a social gathering. This song is commonly sung at graduation ceremonies in universities, colleges and high schools. The correct answers score 2 points each.

5. Please explain in your own words the meaning of the above line, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

5.Like Horace's "Carpe diem", the singer invites the listeners to enjoy life while they still can, because life itself is short. The correct answer, or anything along the same lines as this, scores 4 points.

ITEM FIVE
NAM DUO MAGNORUM VIRIDI COEUNTIA SILVA CORPORA SERPENTUM BACULI VIOLAVERAT ICTU. DEQUE VIRO FACTUS (MIRABILE) FEMINA SEPTEM EGERAT AUTUMNOS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate these lines in English as faithfully as possible and AS PROSE. (4 points).

1. Indeed he had once separated, with a blow of his staff, the bodies of tho huge snakes [mating)] in the green forest (or: in the thick of the forest). [Because of this] from the man that he was he had been, surprisingly, turned into a woman, and he had thus spent seven years. [or: seven autumns/falls]. The correct answer scores 4 points.
2. Who wrote these lines, and where? (1 point each)

2. Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), Metamprphoses, book III, lines 324-327. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. Who is the character referred to in these lines? (1 point)

3. Tiresias. The correct answer scores 1 point.

4. The same character appears in a parodic version of himself in a twentieth-century poem, originally published in 1922. Who wrote it? (2 points)

4. T.S. Eliot (The Waste Land, Section 3) . The correct answer scores 2 points
5. A rock song, published in 1973, quotes yet again the same character and again in a parodic version; it also quotes some lines from the poem referred to in Question 4. What is the title of this song? (3 points)

5. The Cinema Show, by Genesis. ("Take another trip back with Father Tiresias...") The correct answer scores 3 points.


FINAL STANDINGS
First place: GAIUS CLAUDIUS BARBATUS - 46 points - WINNER OF THE GAME
Second place: AULUS SCRIBONIUS NASICA - 39 points

Third place: GAIUS AURELIUS PAULLUS - 14 points


   Optime valete,

      A. Iulius Paterculus


Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

A. Tullia Scholastica, consul
 

A. Tullia Scholastica C. Aurelio Paullo S.P.D. 

-----------------------------------------

From: "C. Aurelius Paullus"
To: TheForumRomanum@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 19 2021 8:18:49PM
Subject: Re: [Forum Romanum] LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

G. Aurelius Paullus A. Iulio Paterculo SPD

Benigne dicis. Ludum fructus sum et spero alius erit.

ATS:  If I may emend this...'ludo fructus sum et spero alium fore.'   'Fruor' is one of five verbs which govern the ablative; spero tends to take a future infinitive, and its object must be accusative.  



Thank you. I enjoyed the competition and I hope there will be another.

Vale

Vale! 


On Mon, Sep 20, 2021 at 5:50 AM A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis <arthur.f.waite@...> wrote:
Salvete omnes,
  Below you will find the answers and results of the latest instalment of Ipse Dixit, composed by my honourable colleague, Ædilis Curulis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus:

ITEM ONE
GLADIATOR IN ARENA CONSILIVM CAPIT

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. The gladiator takes his decision in the arena. (Literal) . Score is 2 points.
2. Who wrote this, and where? (1 point, 1 more point for the source)

2. Lucius Annæus Seneca (Seneca the Younger). Epistulæ Morales ad Lucilius, book III, XXII, 1. Score is 1 point + 1 point for the correct source.
3. Explain in your own word the meaning of this sentence, as opposed to its translation. (3 points)

3. It is useless to worry about danger, before danger actually occurs.  In Italy we also say "bandage your head before you break it". Since the corresponding question is "interpretative", any answer along these lines is fine. Score is 3 points.


ITEM TWO
O FORTUNA, VELVT LVNA, STATV VARIABILIS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. O Fortune, like the Moon, you are changeable.

2. The original poem is anonymous. What is the title of the collection in which it appears, and when was the collection originally put together? (1 point, 1 point for the date)

2. Carmina Burana ("Songs of Benediktbauern", in Germany - the Latin name of the town was Buria.). Originally written in 1230.
3. Who wrote the most famous and most widely used musical setting of this poem? (1 point)

3. Carl Orff.
4. In the musical work mentioned in Question 3, what is the title of the section where this poem is set, and what does the title mean? (2 + 2 points)

4. Fortuna, Imperatrix Mundi ("Fortune, Empress of the World").


ITEM THREE
NEMO PROPHETA ACCEPTVS EST IN PATRIA SVA

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. No prophet is accepted in his homeland/fatherland. Correct answer scores 2 points

2. Who wrote this phrase? (1 point)

2. St. Luke, in his Gospel. (4:24). Correct answer scores 1 point.
3. Who SPOKE this phrase? (1 point)

3. Jesus. Correct answer scores 1 point
4. Explain in your own words the meaning of this phrase, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

4. People usually encounter several hardships in proving their worth, or generally in being appreciated, in the place where they were born, or in a familiar environment; by contrast, it is much easier for people to become popular or successful in other places. It is generally said about people who are not appreciated for what they do by people who are the nearest to them: relatives, colleagues, fellow citizens, fellow countrymen, friends etc. Anything along these lines, even if simpler, scores 4 points.


ITEM FOUR
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR, IUVENES DUM SUMUS

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. So/therefore let us enjoy, while we are (still) young. The correct answer scores 2 points
2. What is the title of the song from which this line is taken, and what does the title mean? (1 point each)

2. De Brevitate Vitæ. On the Shotrness of Life. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. The original song is anonymous, but who wrote the lyrics used today, which differ in several points from the original text? (2 points)

3. Christer Wilhelm (or William) Kindleben. Seneca the Younger wrote an UNRELATED treatise called De Brevitate Vitæ which does NOT include the quote. The correct answer scores 2 points, "Seneca" scores nothing.

4. This song is known as a "commercium song". What is a commercium song, and in which events is this song most commonly sung today? (2 points each)

4. A commercium song is a song to be sung at a social gathering. This song is commonly sung at graduation ceremonies in universities, colleges and high schools. The correct answers score 2 points each.

5. Please explain in your own words the meaning of the above line, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

5.Like Horace's "Carpe diem", the singer invites the listeners to enjoy life while they still can, because life itself is short. The correct answer, or anything along the same lines as this, scores 4 points.

ITEM FIVE
NAM DUO MAGNORUM VIRIDI COEUNTIA SILVA CORPORA SERPENTUM BACULI VIOLAVERAT ICTU. DEQUE VIRO FACTUS (MIRABILE) FEMINA SEPTEM EGERAT AUTUMNOS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate these lines in English as faithfully as possible and AS PROSE. (4 points).

1. Indeed he had once separated, with a blow of his staff, the bodies of tho huge snakes [mating)] in the green forest (or: in the thick of the forest). [Because of this] from the man that he was he had been, surprisingly, turned into a woman, and he had thus spent seven years. [or: seven autumns/falls]. The correct answer scores 4 points.
2. Who wrote these lines, and where? (1 point each)

2. Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), Metamprphoses, book III, lines 324-327. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. Who is the character referred to in these lines? (1 point)

3. Tiresias. The correct answer scores 1 point.

4. The same character appears in a parodic version of himself in a twentieth-century poem, originally published in 1922. Who wrote it? (2 points)

4. T.S. Eliot (The Waste Land, Section 3) . The correct answer scores 2 points
5. A rock song, published in 1973, quotes yet again the same character and again in a parodic version; it also quotes some lines from the poem referred to in Question 4. What is the title of this song? (3 points)

5. The Cinema Show, by Genesis. ("Take another trip back with Father Tiresias...") The correct answer scores 3 points.


FINAL STANDINGS
First place: GAIUS CLAUDIUS BARBATUS - 46 points - WINNER OF THE GAME
Second place: AULUS SCRIBONIUS NASICA - 39 points

Third place: GAIUS AURELIUS PAULLUS - 14 points


   Optime valete,

      A. Iulius Paterculus


Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

C. Aurelius Paullus
 

G. Aurelius Paullus A. Iulio Paterculo SPD

Benigne dicis. Ludum fructus sum et spero alius erit.

Thank you. I enjoyed the competition and I hope there will be another.

Vale

On Mon, Sep 20, 2021 at 5:50 AM A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis <arthur.f.waite@...> wrote:
Salvete omnes,
  Below you will find the answers and results of the latest instalment of Ipse Dixit, composed by my honourable colleague, Ædilis Curulis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus:

ITEM ONE
GLADIATOR IN ARENA CONSILIVM CAPIT

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. The gladiator takes his decision in the arena. (Literal) . Score is 2 points.
2. Who wrote this, and where? (1 point, 1 more point for the source)

2. Lucius Annæus Seneca (Seneca the Younger). Epistulæ Morales ad Lucilius, book III, XXII, 1. Score is 1 point + 1 point for the correct source.
3. Explain in your own word the meaning of this sentence, as opposed to its translation. (3 points)

3. It is useless to worry about danger, before danger actually occurs.  In Italy we also say "bandage your head before you break it". Since the corresponding question is "interpretative", any answer along these lines is fine. Score is 3 points.


ITEM TWO
O FORTUNA, VELVT LVNA, STATV VARIABILIS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. O Fortune, like the Moon, you are changeable.

2. The original poem is anonymous. What is the title of the collection in which it appears, and when was the collection originally put together? (1 point, 1 point for the date)

2. Carmina Burana ("Songs of Benediktbauern", in Germany - the Latin name of the town was Buria.). Originally written in 1230.
3. Who wrote the most famous and most widely used musical setting of this poem? (1 point)

3. Carl Orff.
4. In the musical work mentioned in Question 3, what is the title of the section where this poem is set, and what does the title mean? (2 + 2 points)

4. Fortuna, Imperatrix Mundi ("Fortune, Empress of the World").


ITEM THREE
NEMO PROPHETA ACCEPTVS EST IN PATRIA SVA

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. No prophet is accepted in his homeland/fatherland. Correct answer scores 2 points

2. Who wrote this phrase? (1 point)

2. St. Luke, in his Gospel. (4:24). Correct answer scores 1 point.
3. Who SPOKE this phrase? (1 point)

3. Jesus. Correct answer scores 1 point
4. Explain in your own words the meaning of this phrase, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

4. People usually encounter several hardships in proving their worth, or generally in being appreciated, in the place where they were born, or in a familiar environment; by contrast, it is much easier for people to become popular or successful in other places. It is generally said about people who are not appreciated for what they do by people who are the nearest to them: relatives, colleagues, fellow citizens, fellow countrymen, friends etc. Anything along these lines, even if simpler, scores 4 points.


ITEM FOUR
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR, IUVENES DUM SUMUS

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. So/therefore let us enjoy, while we are (still) young. The correct answer scores 2 points
2. What is the title of the song from which this line is taken, and what does the title mean? (1 point each)

2. De Brevitate Vitæ. On the Shotrness of Life. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. The original song is anonymous, but who wrote the lyrics used today, which differ in several points from the original text? (2 points)

3. Christer Wilhelm (or William) Kindleben. Seneca the Younger wrote an UNRELATED treatise called De Brevitate Vitæ which does NOT include the quote. The correct answer scores 2 points, "Seneca" scores nothing.

4. This song is known as a "commercium song". What is a commercium song, and in which events is this song most commonly sung today? (2 points each)

4. A commercium song is a song to be sung at a social gathering. This song is commonly sung at graduation ceremonies in universities, colleges and high schools. The correct answers score 2 points each.

5. Please explain in your own words the meaning of the above line, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

5.Like Horace's "Carpe diem", the singer invites the listeners to enjoy life while they still can, because life itself is short. The correct answer, or anything along the same lines as this, scores 4 points.

ITEM FIVE
NAM DUO MAGNORUM VIRIDI COEUNTIA SILVA CORPORA SERPENTUM BACULI VIOLAVERAT ICTU. DEQUE VIRO FACTUS (MIRABILE) FEMINA SEPTEM EGERAT AUTUMNOS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate these lines in English as faithfully as possible and AS PROSE. (4 points).

1. Indeed he had once separated, with a blow of his staff, the bodies of tho huge snakes [mating)] in the green forest (or: in the thick of the forest). [Because of this] from the man that he was he had been, surprisingly, turned into a woman, and he had thus spent seven years. [or: seven autumns/falls]. The correct answer scores 4 points.
2. Who wrote these lines, and where? (1 point each)

2. Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), Metamprphoses, book III, lines 324-327. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. Who is the character referred to in these lines? (1 point)

3. Tiresias. The correct answer scores 1 point.

4. The same character appears in a parodic version of himself in a twentieth-century poem, originally published in 1922. Who wrote it? (2 points)

4. T.S. Eliot (The Waste Land, Section 3) . The correct answer scores 2 points
5. A rock song, published in 1973, quotes yet again the same character and again in a parodic version; it also quotes some lines from the poem referred to in Question 4. What is the title of this song? (3 points)

5. The Cinema Show, by Genesis. ("Take another trip back with Father Tiresias...") The correct answer scores 3 points.


FINAL STANDINGS
First place: GAIUS CLAUDIUS BARBATUS - 46 points - WINNER OF THE GAME
Second place: AULUS SCRIBONIUS NASICA - 39 points

Third place: GAIUS AURELIUS PAULLUS - 14 points


   Optime valete,

      A. Iulius Paterculus


LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: IPSE DIXIT: Solutions & Winner Proclamation

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

Salvete omnes,
  Below you will find the answers and results of the latest instalment of Ipse Dixit, composed by my honourable colleague, Ædilis Curulis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus:

ITEM ONE
GLADIATOR IN ARENA CONSILIVM CAPIT

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. The gladiator takes his decision in the arena. (Literal) . Score is 2 points.
2. Who wrote this, and where? (1 point, 1 more point for the source)

2. Lucius Annæus Seneca (Seneca the Younger). Epistulæ Morales ad Lucilius, book III, XXII, 1. Score is 1 point + 1 point for the correct source.
3. Explain in your own word the meaning of this sentence, as opposed to its translation. (3 points)

3. It is useless to worry about danger, before danger actually occurs.  In Italy we also say "bandage your head before you break it". Since the corresponding question is "interpretative", any answer along these lines is fine. Score is 3 points.


ITEM TWO
O FORTUNA, VELVT LVNA, STATV VARIABILIS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. O Fortune, like the Moon, you are changeable.

2. The original poem is anonymous. What is the title of the collection in which it appears, and when was the collection originally put together? (1 point, 1 point for the date)

2. Carmina Burana ("Songs of Benediktbauern", in Germany - the Latin name of the town was Buria.). Originally written in 1230.
3. Who wrote the most famous and most widely used musical setting of this poem? (1 point)

3. Carl Orff.
4. In the musical work mentioned in Question 3, what is the title of the section where this poem is set, and what does the title mean? (2 + 2 points)

4. Fortuna, Imperatrix Mundi ("Fortune, Empress of the World").


ITEM THREE
NEMO PROPHETA ACCEPTVS EST IN PATRIA SVA

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. No prophet is accepted in his homeland/fatherland. Correct answer scores 2 points

2. Who wrote this phrase? (1 point)

2. St. Luke, in his Gospel. (4:24). Correct answer scores 1 point.
3. Who SPOKE this phrase? (1 point)

3. Jesus. Correct answer scores 1 point
4. Explain in your own words the meaning of this phrase, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

4. People usually encounter several hardships in proving their worth, or generally in being appreciated, in the place where they were born, or in a familiar environment; by contrast, it is much easier for people to become popular or successful in other places. It is generally said about people who are not appreciated for what they do by people who are the nearest to them: relatives, colleagues, fellow citizens, fellow countrymen, friends etc. Anything along these lines, even if simpler, scores 4 points.


ITEM FOUR
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR, IUVENES DUM SUMUS

Questions/Answers:
1. Please translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)

1. So/therefore let us enjoy, while we are (still) young. The correct answer scores 2 points
2. What is the title of the song from which this line is taken, and what does the title mean? (1 point each)

2. De Brevitate Vitæ. On the Shotrness of Life. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. The original song is anonymous, but who wrote the lyrics used today, which differ in several points from the original text? (2 points)

3. Christer Wilhelm (or William) Kindleben. Seneca the Younger wrote an UNRELATED treatise called De Brevitate Vitæ which does NOT include the quote. The correct answer scores 2 points, "Seneca" scores nothing.

4. This song is known as a "commercium song". What is a commercium song, and in which events is this song most commonly sung today? (2 points each)

4. A commercium song is a song to be sung at a social gathering. This song is commonly sung at graduation ceremonies in universities, colleges and high schools. The correct answers score 2 points each.

5. Please explain in your own words the meaning of the above line, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

5.Like Horace's "Carpe diem", the singer invites the listeners to enjoy life while they still can, because life itself is short. The correct answer, or anything along the same lines as this, scores 4 points.

ITEM FIVE
NAM DUO MAGNORUM VIRIDI COEUNTIA SILVA CORPORA SERPENTUM BACULI VIOLAVERAT ICTU. DEQUE VIRO FACTUS (MIRABILE) FEMINA SEPTEM EGERAT AUTUMNOS.

Questions/Answers:
1. Translate these lines in English as faithfully as possible and AS PROSE. (4 points).

1. Indeed he had once separated, with a blow of his staff, the bodies of tho huge snakes [mating)] in the green forest (or: in the thick of the forest). [Because of this] from the man that he was he had been, surprisingly, turned into a woman, and he had thus spent seven years. [or: seven autumns/falls]. The correct answer scores 4 points.
2. Who wrote these lines, and where? (1 point each)

2. Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid), Metamprphoses, book III, lines 324-327. The correct answers score 1 point each.

3. Who is the character referred to in these lines? (1 point)

3. Tiresias. The correct answer scores 1 point.

4. The same character appears in a parodic version of himself in a twentieth-century poem, originally published in 1922. Who wrote it? (2 points)

4. T.S. Eliot (The Waste Land, Section 3) . The correct answer scores 2 points
5. A rock song, published in 1973, quotes yet again the same character and again in a parodic version; it also quotes some lines from the poem referred to in Question 4. What is the title of this song? (3 points)

5. The Cinema Show, by Genesis. ("Take another trip back with Father Tiresias...") The correct answer scores 3 points.


FINAL STANDINGS
First place: GAIUS CLAUDIUS BARBATUS - 46 points - WINNER OF THE GAME
Second place: AULUS SCRIBONIUS NASICA - 39 points

Third place: GAIUS AURELIUS PAULLUS - 14 points


   Optime valete,

      A. Iulius Paterculus


LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Chariot Race

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

Salvete omnes,
The crowds are again gathered in the hippodrome in expectation of
another day of excitement. The stone seating near the front is packed
with senators, and other familiar faces are visible higher in the
stands as well. Everyone looks exhilarated, though whether it is from
the prospect that their favoured teams will be victorious or simply
the pleasure of gathering in the fresh air and sunshine is hard to
say.
Now the charioteers are announced, one at a time. The first to
arrive is Celsus Vulso, driving Corona Obsidionalis. The green-tinted
chariot and veteran driver draw cheers of recognition of fans of
Factio Præsina, and even a few grudging claps from some partisans of
Veneta, who came to admire the spirit shown by Celsus when he was
driving for them. D. Aurelius Ingenarius, sponsor for this chariot,
shouts down to his driver, "Don't hesitate. Speed at all costs."
The next chariot is called "The Ultros", driven by Ptolemaíos of
Argos. Ptolemaios is a swarthy man with almost shoulder-length black
hair, a full beard, and moustache. He wears armour with crimson
pteruges, one of the signs that he drives for Factio Russata. After,
the fans of the Reds have had a chance to cheer their new recruit, his
sponsor, D. Fabricus Avitus, who had escorted Ptolemaíos onto the
field, quietly shakes his hand before climbing into the stands and
taking a seat a little behind where Ingeniarius is sitting.
Third announced among those contending in this race is Barinthus,
driving Blue Max. Fans of Veneta erupt into extended applause for this
courageous Celt, who has represented their faction on the racetrack
for more than ten years, and for the chariot itself, which has
performed well for the other driver sponsored by M. Martianus Lupus,
Ursinus.
Finally, Dorothea is announced, along with her current chariot, Nova
Roma. Russata again cheers, even more enthusiastically than before,
for both have proven themselves in the past. Celsus Vulso and
Barinthus both look at this last racer warily, having contended with
her clever driving and sarcastic wit in the past. She is fairly short,
with brown hair and black eyes. Cn. Cornelius Lentulus is her sponsor.
The four chariots are released at once from the starting stalls.
Dorothea gets a head start early on through energetic use of the whip,
but Barinthus and Blue Max quickly catch up, so the two are side by
side. Corona Obsidionalis and The Ultros are hanging back a little, as
if their drivers are conserving the horses' energy for something
ahead.
Halfway through the first lap, Barinthus manages to get a slight
lead on Dorothea, with the other two chariots moments behind. As they
go into the first curve, Dorothea passes close by the central barrier:
a dangerous tactic, but one that gives her enough extra speed to
regain the lead. Barinthus declines to do the same, but both
Ptolemaios and Celsus employ this technique successfully as well,
leaving Barinthus to catch back up with the others in the next
straight section of track.
"If you want to play safe, take up latrunculi: that's no way to win
in the circus," shouts Dorothea back at the champion of the Blues, as
she heads into the second lap.
Goaded by these words, Barinthus drives his team faster and faster.
Momentarily, it seems he may overtake everyone, but one of his horses
trips on an unseen pebble, causing Blue Max to lose balance and crash
to the side. Barinthus manages to cut himself free of the reins in
time to avoid injury, and staggers off on the track, seeming only a
little dizzy from the incident.
All three remaining charioteers continue their strategy of picking
up speed on the curves. It works for Nova Roma, but Corona
Obsidionalis and The Ultros are so neck and neck, that the tactic puts
both in essentially the same place. The resulting jostling costs the
speed going into the third and fourth laps. At the start of the fifth
it actually sends The Ultros crashing into the spina. Its charioteer,
Ptolemaíos, is well protected and seems pretty tough (rumour has it he
was a hoplite back in Argos): he'll be fine. The Ultos, on the other
hand, will need serious repair.
Without the direct interference, Celsus Vulso closes the gap with
Dorothea a bit with each lap, but Nova Roma still has a lead of about
a Roman foot when the race ends.
Results:
1st - Nova Roma (Cn. Cornelius Lentulus)
2nd - Corona Obsidionalis (D. Aurelius Ingeniarius)
Valete,
A. Iulius Paterculus


LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Rankings & Answers

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

Salvete omnes,
The Certamen Caledonicum has now concluded. Below is the list of
participants:
1st Place - C. Claudius Quadratus (33 points - A perfect score!)
2nd Place - D. Fabricius Avitus (31 points)
3rd Place - D. Aurelius Ingeniarius
Honourable Mentions:
M. Martianus Lupus (27 points)
A. Scribonius Nasica (27 points)
C. Claudius Barbatus (17 points)
C. Pompeius Marcellus (1 point)

It's noteworthy that both M. Martianus Lupus and C. Claudius
Barbatus lost points due to answers being submitted after the
deadline. If this deadline was not taken into account, M. Martianus
would have tied for first place and C. Claudius Barbatus would have
tied A. Scribonius with 27 points.
Here are the answers:
1. What modern country shares roughly the same territory as Caledonia (1 point)?
Modern Scotland holds the same general territory as ancient Caledonia. [1]
2. In A.D. 82, the Romans first occupied part of Caledonia following
what decisive battle (2 points)? Which general led the Roman forces to
this victory (2 points)?
Caledonia was occupied following the battle at Mons Graupius, won by
Gnaeus Julius Agricola. [1]
3. What Caledonian leader is quoted as making a speech by the
historian Tacitus (1 point)?
Calgacus[7] (sometimes written as Galgacus [5]) is credited with this
famous speech criticizing the rapaciousness of the Romans.
4. During the reign of which emperor did the Roman army abandon their
fort at Inchtuthil (1 point)? Domitian (c. 90 A.D.) [1]
5. At Inchtuthil, several tons’ worth of a particular kind item was
discovered. What object was this (2 points)? Why might the Romans have
considered these worth hiding (2 points)?
Several tons of iron nails [2] were found, which may have been hidden:
to prevent them from being reforged into weapons, because iron more
valuable to the Scots of the time than gold, because they had to be
hand-made and would thus be difficult to re-make (any of these was an
acceptable answer).[3]
6. Which Emperor fixed the border between Britannia and Caledonia (2
points)? Roughly how many years ago did this take place (2 points)?
How did he mark this boundary the following year (2 points)?
The Emperor Hadrian [1] fixed this border around 1900 years ago.
(Actually, this anniversary was the motivation for this quiz!) Hadrian
marked this boundary by starting Hadrian’s Wall the following year,
122 A.D.
7. Around 144 A.D. the Romans built a wall to separate their territory
from the unconquered north. What fortification was this (4 points)?
Which general was assigned to build it (2 points)?
This was the Antonine Wall [1], built by Quintus Lollius Urbicus [4].
8. Which emperor personally led an expedition into Caledonia with his
two sons (2 points)? What is believed to have halted this invasion (2
points)?
Septimius Severus led this mission with his sons Geta and Caracalla.
The death of Severus ended the project. [6]
9. When (2 points) and by whom (2 points) was the first known mention
of the Picts? What is the meaning of their name in Latin (2 points)?
Eumenius (297 CE) called to the tribes of Northern Britain as "Picti"
("the painted ones"), supposedly because they painted their bodies.
[7]
Sources:
[1] https://www.britannica.com/place/Caledonia-ancient-region-Britain
[2] http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0006:entry=inchtuthil
[3] http://www.glasgowsteelnail.com/romans2.HTM
[4] https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryMagazine/DestinationsUK/The-Antonine-Wall/
[5]http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0081%3Achapter%3D30
[6] http://anarmysfootsteps.leadr.msu.edu/the-roman-army-in-scotland/
[7] https://www.worldhistory.org/picts/
https://www.britannica.com/place/Scotland/Roman-penetration#ref483789

Thank you to everyone who participated.
Valete.


LUDI ROMANI - IPSE DIXIT: Item Five

P. Annaeus Constantinus Placidus, aedilis curulis
 

Ædilis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus omnibus in Foro, et omnibus Civibus bonæ voluntati S.P.D.

For the fifth and last Item of this Ludi Romani edition of my long-running quiz IPSE DIXIT, I have chosen high poetry, and a quote about a character which has been exploited at least twice in modern times.

ITEM FIVE
NAM DUO MAGNORUM VIRIDI COEUNTIA SILVA CORPORA SERPENTUM BACULI VIOLAVERAT ICTU. DEQUE VIRO FACTUS (MIRABILE) FEMINA SEPTEM EGERAT AUTUMNOS.

Questions:
1. Translate these lines in English as faithfully as possible and AS PROSE. (4 points).
2. Who wrote these lines, and where? (1 point each)
3. Who is the character referred to in these lines? (1 point)
4. The same character appears in a parodic version of himself in a twentieth-century poem, originally published in 1922. Who wrote it? (2 points)
5. A rock song, published in 1973, quotes yet again the same character and again in a parodic version; it also quotes some lines from the poem referred to in Question 4. What is the title of this song? (3 points)

Rules for Participation

Please send an e-mail with your answers to my illustrious Ædilician colleague Aulus Iulius Paterculus, using his address arthur DOT f DOT waite AT gmail DOT com. DO NOT reply directly to this mail and DO NOT post your answers on the Nova Roma Main List, on Facebook or anywhere else on the Web. Doing any of these will result in your immediate disqualification from the game. All items before and including this one shall be valid until the conclusion of the game.

Have fun, and good luck for your research! :-)

Optime valete omnes,
P. Annæus Constantinus Placidus
Ædilis Curulis Novæ Romæ 





LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Question IX

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

A. Iulius Paterculus omnibus in foro s.p.d.
It's time for the ninth and final question in our Caledonia quiz:

9. When (2 points) and by whom (2 points) was the first known mention
of the Picts? What is the meaning of their name in Latin (2 points)?

Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum" in the subject line. The deadline
for responses to all questions will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday,
September 17th (less than twelve hours away). Please do not share the
answers prior to this deadline, as it will lead to disqualification.
Valete!

P.S In case you have missed any prior questions, here are the other eight:
1. What modern country shares roughly the same territory as
Caledonia (1 point)?
2. In A.D. 82, the Romans first occupied part of Caledonia
following what decisive battle (2 points)? Which general led the Roman
forces to this victory (2 points)?
3. What Caledonian leader is quoted making a speech by the
historian Tacitus (1 point)?
4. During the reign of which emperor did the Roman army abandon
their fort at Inchtuthil (1 point)?
5. At Inchtuthil, several tons’ worth of a particular kind item was
discovered. What object was this (2 points)? Why might the Romans have
considered these worth hiding (2 points)?
6. Which Emperor fixed the border between Britannia and Caledonia
(2 points)? Roughly how many years ago did this take place (2 points)?
How did he mark this boundary the following year (2 points)?
7. Around 144 A.D. the Romans built a wall to separate their
territory from the unconquered north. What fortification was this (4
points)? Which general was assigned to build it (2 points)?
8. Which emperor personally led an expedition into Caledonia with
his two sons (2 points)? What is believed to have halted this invasion
(2 points)?


LUDI ROMANI - IPSE DIXIT: Item Four

P. Annaeus Constantinus Placidus, aedilis curulis
 

Ædilis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus omnibus in Foro, et omnibus Civibus bonæ voluntati S.P.D.

Here is, for all of you, the fourth item of my long-running quiz based on Latin quotations, IPSE DIXIT. Here we are lovering the level considerably... from the solemnity of the quote in Item Three to the triviality of this quote, which is taken from a very old song in Latin.

ITEM FOUR
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR, IUVENES DUM SUMUS

Questions:
1 .Please translate this sentence into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)
2. What is the title of the song from which this line is taken, and what does the title mean? (1 point each)
3. The original song is anonymous, but who wrote the lyrics used today, which differ in several points from the original text? (2 points)
4. This song is known as a "commercium song". What is a commercium song, and in which events is this song most commonly sung today? (2 points each)
5. Please explain in your own words the meaning of the above line, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

Rules for Participation
Please send an e-mail with your answers to my illustrious Ædilician colleague Aulus Iulius Paterculus, using his address arthur DOT f DOT waite AT gmail DOT com. DO NOT reply directly to this mail and DO NOT post your answers on the Nova Roma Main List, on Facebook or anywhere else on the Web. Doing any of these will result in your immediate disqualification from the game. All items before and including this one shall be valid until the conclusion of the game.

Have fun, and good luck for your research! :-)

Optime valete omnes,
P. Annæus Constantinus Placidus
Ædilis Curulis Novæ Romæ






Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Call for Chariots

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

Salvete omnes,
We are still seeking chariots and charioteers for the race this weekend.
If you are interested in participating, please send the following
information to *arthur [dot] f [dot] waite [at] gmail [dot] com*
(please don't send it to the Main List) by noon (Rome time) on
Saturday, September 18th:
A. Your Roman name;

B. The name of your driver;

C. The name of your chariot;

D. Your tactics (any one from the list below):
*A. To hurry in the last laps*
*B. To pass the curves closely the "spina" of the circus.*
*C. To support a constant pace*
*D. To lash the rivals*
*E. To push the rivals to the wall of the circus*
*F. To hurry in the straight lines*

E. The name of your factio/team (any one from the list below):
*- Albata (the Whites)*
*- Præsina (the Greens)*
*- Russata (the Reds)*
*- Veneta (the Blues)*

The items above are all you need to submit to participate, but
additional details you would like to send in about your chariot and/or
charioteer may be used to make the final event more engaging.
If you're interested in finding out more about the racing tactics or
our virtual races in general, you can see the full set of rules at:
http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Regulae_ludorum#Circenses_Rules

Factio Albata does not yet have a representative in these races, so
this is a good opportunity for a fan of the Whites to sign up a
chariot. Naturally, however members of all factions are encouraged to
participate.

Valete.

On 9/9/21, A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis via groups.io
<arthur.f.waite=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A. Iulius Paterculus omnibus in foro s.p.d.
We will be running a (virtual) chariot race on September 19th. If
you are interested in participating, please send the following
information to *arthur [dot] f [dot] waite [at] gmail
[dot] com* (please don't send it to the Main List) by noon (Rome time)
on Saturday, September 18th:
A. Your Roman name;

B. The name of your driver;

C. The name of your chariot;

D. Your tactics (any one from the list below):
*A. To hurry in the last laps*
*B. To pass the curves closely the "spina" of the circus.*
*C. To support a constant pace*
*D. To lash the rivals*
*E. To push the rivals to the wall of the circus*
*F. To hurry in the straight lines*

E. The name of your factio/team (any one from the list below):
*- Albata (the Whites)*
*- Præsina (the Greens)*
*- Russata (the Reds)*
*- Veneta (the Blues)*

The items above are all you need to submit to participate, but
additional details you would like to send in about your chariot and/or
charioteer may be used to make the final event more engaging.
If you're interested in finding out more about the racing tactics or
our virtual races in general, you can see the full set of rules at:
http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Regulae_ludorum#Circenses_Rules

Optime valete.






Re: LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Oratiuncularum

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

A. Iulius Paterculus omnibus in foro s.p.d.
This is a second call for entries in our micro-essay contest.

To enter, simply submit a short (50-75 words) essay on one of the
following topics (your choice):
1. What Roman technology, skill, or custom would you like to see
widely adopted through our world today, and why?
2. What figure from Roman history most deserves more credit from
historians than he or she has received in the past, and why?
3. Other than the Greeks and Etruscans, which other culture do you
consider to have had the most significant influence on the Romans, and
why?

To put this in context, the paragraph above, from "To enter" to the
end of the last question, has 85 words, 10 over the maximum for this
competition, so please don't be intimidated by this task - if you have
an opinion on any of the listed topics, and a few good reasons for it,
you have what it takes to participate.

Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Oratiuncularum" in the subject line. Please also
mention your Roman name somewhere in the email (outside of your actual
essay) so the correct person is credited The deadline for all
responses will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday, September 17th. Ties
will go to the newer citizen.

Essays will be shared on the Main List after judging is complete.

Valete.

On 9/9/21, Arthur Waite <arthur.f.waite@gmail.com> wrote:
A. Iulius Paterculus omnibus iterum s.p.d.

As part of our celebration of the Ludi Romani, all Novi Romani are
invited to participate in a short essay/speech contest.

To enter, simply submit a short (50-75 words) essay on one of the
following topics (your choice):
1. What Roman technology, skill, or custom would you like to see
widely adopted through our world today, and why?
2. What figure from Roman history most deserves more credit from
historians than he or she has received in the past, and why?
3. Other than the Greeks and Etruscans, which other culture do you
consider to have had the most significant influence on the Romans, and
why?

Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Oratiuncularum" in the subject line. The deadline
for all responses will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday, September
17th. Ties will go to the newer citizen.

Essays will be shared on the Main List after judging is complete.

If you want to frame your essay with a short narrative describing
yourself delivering it as speech in the Roman Forum, you're welcome to
do so. Such framing text will not be counted towards your word count
or effect your scoring (in fact, it will not be sent when the essay is
to be judged, only when it is posted publicly); it would just be
optional flavour.

Valete.


LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Question VIII

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

Salvete iterum,
The games continue with yet another instalment of our quiz on the
Romans and Caledonia:

8. Which emperor personally led an expedition into Calcedonia with his
two sons (2 points)? What is believed to have halted this invasion (2
points)?

Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum" in the subject line. The deadline
for responses to all questions will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday,
September 17th. Please do not share the answers prior to this
deadline, as it will lead to disqualification.
Optime valete.

P.S If you need to catch up on any questions, here are the first seven:
1. What modern country shares roughly the same territory as
Caledonia (1 point)?
2. In A.D. 82, the Romans first occupied part of Caledonia
following what decisive battle (2 points)? Which general led the Roman
forces to this victory (2 points)?
3. What Caledonian leader is quoted making a speech by the
historian Tacitus (1 point)?
4. During the reign of which emperor did the Roman army abandon
their fort at Inchtuthil (1 point)?
5. At Inchtuthil, several tons’ worth of a particular kind item was
discovered. What object was this (2 points)? Why might the Romans have
considered these worth hiding (2 points)?
6. Which Emperor fixed the border between Britannia and Caledonia
(2 points)? Roughly how many years ago did this take place (2 points)?
How did he mark this boundary the following year (2 points)?
7. Around 144 A.D. the Romans built a wall to separate their
territory from the unconquered north. What fortification was this (4
points)? Which general was assigned to build it (2 points)?


Re: Sodalitates paratae!

 

D Aurelius Ingeniarius Tribunus Plebis et Legatus Omnibus sal.

As scriba for the Officium Rei Informaticae, I offer my services to all the officers of the various sodalites to update their sodalitas website pages. If you don't have an account on the website, then I can edit the pages on your behalf. 

Links to the sodalites can be found here: http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Sodalitas. I have already updated all the sodalitas pages with the official forum (mailing list) URLs from Groups.io that all sodalites officers have chosen so far. 

Please reach out to me via email or through our Nova Roma Discord: https://discord.gg/AtkTd5X. 

--

Per ardua ad astra.  

D AVRELIVS INGENIARIVS
▪︎Legatus Pro Praetore Australiae
▪︎Tribunus Plebis
▪︎Accensus Consularis
▪︎Scriba Editor Situs Internetualis Publici
▪︎Praefectus Editor Principalis Canalis Twitch Novae Romae
▪︎Eques Equo Publico (Eques Publicus)
▪︎Res Publica Nova Romana
 

Nova Roma Album: http://www.novaroma.org/civitas/album?id=16353    
LinkedIn Profile:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/d-aurelius-ingeniarius/
Nova Roma Profile:
http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Decimus_Aurelius_Ingeniarius_(Nova_Roma)

PROVINCIA AUSTRALIA
(Nova Roma, Australia & New Zealand Chapter)
Contact the Consilium Provinciae: 
austnovaroma@...
Visit our website: 
http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Australia


Sodalitates paratae!

A. Tullia Scholastica, consul
 

A. Tullia Scholastica quiritibus bonae voluntatis S.P.D. 

I am delighted to report that Lentulus has at last been able to add the pictures to all but one of the sodalities (though one is not the normal one we use), so all but the gladiatorial one may be entered at this time.  Admission is restricted in the literary sodalities (Latinitas, Graeciae, and Musarum, as well as in Coq & Coq), and my school has begun, plus we are still taking registrations, so I may not be able to tend to the sodalities immediately, but will do so as soon as possible.  My colleague Consul Q. Arrius Nauta is in charge of militaris; Jovius is in charge of the gladiatorial one, and Lentulus is in command of the pro diis (templaris) religious sodalitas; they will manage admissions there.  

The addresses are: 



The sodalities are a good way of communicating with people with similar interests, notably other citizens; unlike their substitutes on Discord and elsewhere, they are official creations of the NR Senate.  As such they have charters and rules, all of which seem good to me, and I have posted the charters as the first message on the sodalities which have temporarily been entrusted to my supervision.  Some of the charters may need some amendments as they are out of date, but are basically sound; when there are enough active members, things can be changed.  Please consider joining one or more of our official sodalities!  So far as I am aware, non-citizens are welcome in all but the moribund Egressus.  

Valete! 


LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Question VII

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

A. Iulius Paterculus omnibus in foro s.p.d.
Today's question for the Certamen Caledonicum is:

7. Around 144 A.D. the Romans built a wall to separate their territory
from the unconquered north. What fortification was this (4 points)?
Which general was assigned to build it (2 points)?

Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum" in the subject line. The deadline
for responses to ALL questions will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday,
September 17th. Please do not share the answers prior to this
deadline, as it will lead to disqualification.
Valete!

P.S. Here are the questions from previous days, if you happened to miss them:
1. What modern country shares roughly the same territory as
Caledonia (1 point)?
2. In A.D. 82, the Romans first occupied part of Caledonia
following what decisive battle (2 points)? Which general led the Roman
forces to this victory (2 points)?
3. What Caledonian leader is quoted making a speech by the
historian Tacitus (1 point)?
4. During the reign of which emperor did the Roman army abandon
their fort at Inchtuthil (1 point)?
5. At Inchtuthil, several tons’ worth of a particular kind item was
discovered. What object was this (2 points)? Why might the Romans have
considered these worth hiding (2 points)?
6. Which Emperor fixed the border between Britannia and Caledonia
(2 points)? Roughly how many years ago did this take place (2 points)?
How did he mark this boundary the following year (2 points)?


LUDI ROMANI - IPSE DIXIT: Item Three

P. Annaeus Constantinus Placidus, aedilis curulis
 

Ædilis Publius Annæus Constantinus Placidus omnibus in Foro, et omnibus Civibus bonæ voluntati S.P.D.

Here is for you the third item of my long-running quiz based on Latin quotations, IPSE DIXIT. As it is usual for all phrases taken from the same source as this, the following phrase is just used for its historical value and is not meant to be offensive or disrespectful towards anybody.

ITEM THREE
NEMO PROPHETA ACCEPTVS EST IN PATRIA SVA

Questions:
1. Please translate this phrase into English as faithfully as possible. (2 points)
2. Who wrote this phrase? (1 point)
3. Who SPOKE this phrase? (1 point)
4. Explain in your own words the meaning of this phrase, as opposed to its translation. (4 points)

Rules for Participation
Please send an e-mail with your answers to my illustrious Ædilician colleague Aulus Iulius Paterculus, using his address arthur DOT f DOT waite AT gmail DOT com. DO NOT reply directly to this mail and DO NOT post your answers on the Nova Roma Main List, on Facebook or anywhere else on the Web. Doing any of these will result in your immediate disqualification from the game. Item One is still valid and, indeed, all items shall be valid until the conclusion of the game.

Have fun, and good luck for your research! :-)

Optime valete omnes,
P. Annæus Constantinus Placidus
Ædilis Curulis Novæ Romæ




LUDI ROMANI | 2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum - Question VI

A. Iulius Paterculus, aedilis curulis
 

Salvete omnes,
Below please find the sixth question in our

6. Which Emperor fixed the border between Britannia and Caledonia
(2 points)? Roughly how many years ago did this take place (2 points)?
How did he mark this boundary the following year (2 points)?

Please send your responses in English to the email address
"arthur.f.waite (at) gmail.com", including the words "LUDI ROMANI |
2774 A.U.C: Certamen Caledonicum" in the subject line. The deadline
for responses to ALL questions will be 11:59 P.M. Rome Time on Friday,
September 17th. Please do not share the answers prior to this
deadline, as it will lead to disqualification.
Valete,
A. Iulius Paterculus

P.S. Below are the first five questions, in case you've missed them:
1. What modern country shares roughly the same territory as
Caledonia (1 point)?
2. In A.D. 82, the Romans first occupied part of Caledonia
following what decisive battle (2 points)? Which general led the Roman
forces to this victory (2 points)?
3. What Caledonian leader is quoted making a speech by the
historian Tacitus (1 point)?
4. During the reign of which emperor did the Roman army abandon
their fort at Inchtuthil (1 point)?
5. At Inchtuthil, several tons’ worth of a particular kind item was
discovered. What object was this (2 points)? Why might the Romans have
considered these worth hiding (2 points)?

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