Topics

worst condition Tektronix scope?


-
 

I've seen ones in worse condition but I don't have pictures. Stuff
coming back to the US from some of the NASA tracking and communications
stations on the Caribbean islands looks much worse. That one looks like it
sat in an unairconditioned outdoor storage shed for 20 years. It's rather
typical of some of the equipment that I find at garage sales here in
central Florida.

On Thu, Nov 26, 2020 at 1:26 PM Sparky99 <jnolan@iprova.com> wrote:

Just saw this on ebay in the UK :
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tektronix-Type-545-Oscilloscope-Vintage-Antique-Collectors/353290325095?hash=item5241be8c67:g:-GYAAOSwBPZfvDOx

Looks like it's been stored in a tropical jungle for a few years!

Anyone got any worse examples?






 

Raymon,

Yes, I saw your comments, and I agree with every one of them. I was making compromises for brevity (and personal bias).

Since I had linked to the TekWiki page I figured that any insufficiency in my descriptions could either be remedied by following the link, or that any truly gross mischaracterizations would be put aright by other comments (such as your own). I have no personal experience with anything but the 475/475A (and the 2213/2215A) so I was wary of writing too much about any of the scopes beyond what I got off the TekWiki pages.

It's a shame that Tek did not make a range of plugins for the 465M. It looks like it's a lot nicer to work on than the 465/475. I wonder why they didn't pursue that avenue of development. There is no mention of other plugin modules for the 455 either, but that TekWiki page appears to be almost a stub.

I'm curious about how the analog storage scopes like the 466 were used. Were you able to get a snapshot of a single wave form? Or did this just capture a persistent image of the repeating signal that we can see on a non-storage scope? I remember my father using the 475 to debug minicomputer hardware. His method involved setting the machine in a tight loop that exercised the suspect part or function, then observing the repeated signal with the scope. Now you would just use a DSO to capture a few microseconds of signal to memory and wander through it at your leisure, but such a thing would have been prohibitively expensive in 1978.

-- Jeff Dutky


 

Hi Jeff,

See my embedded responses.

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 03:02 AM, Jeff Dutky wrote:


It's a shame that Tek did not make a range of plugins for the 465M. It looks
like it's a lot nicer to work on than the 465/475. I wonder why they didn't
pursue that avenue of development. There is no mention of other plugin modules
for the 455 either, but that TekWiki page appears to be almost a stub.
I've sometimes wondered what the technical differences between the central modules of 455 and the 465M were but didn't bother to investigate. I only have a 455, no 465M.
I'm not sure what plugins would be possible and make sense for the 455/465M mainframe(s) but then I'm spoiled by the 7000 family. Besides, I'm sure one would have difficulty configuring the 'scope with the modules needed in preparation for on-site use, the main (intended) environment for a portable 'scope.

I'm curious about how the analog storage scopes like the 466 were used. Were
you able to get a snapshot of a single wave form? Or did this just capture a
persistent image of the repeating signal that we can see on a non-storage
scope?
The 466 is eminently suited to doing exactly what you're suggesting, much more so than even a 464. With a 466 it's quite possible e.g. to store and then observe an edge with a rise time of 3.5 ns (the fastest for the 100 MHz BW), either in Variable Persistence (repeating at say 1 Hz) or Fast Storage (single shot) mode. Compare that with trying to view it on a 'scope like the 465, or for that matter, a 475. Unless the signal has a repetition rate of at least 10 to 100 kHz, it'll be completely invisible!
That's why I love my analog storage 'scopes, at least until I pull out a reasonably modern DSO...

I remember my father using the 475 to debug minicomputer hardware. His
method involved setting the machine in a tight loop that exercised the suspect
part or function, then observing the repeated signal with the scope. Now you
would just use a DSO to capture a few microseconds of signal to memory and
wander through it at your leisure, but such a thing would have been
prohibitively expensive in 1978.
One way was using an Analog Storage 'scope as above, using the delayed time base to move the observable (B-trace) window by adjusting the delay time, until either signal- or delay time-jitter spoiled the fun. A next-level procedure in many cases then would be using the delayed time base not in the common "Runs After Delay" mode but in the "Triggerable After Delay" mode.
In those days, the operator controlled the tools, not vice versa...

Raymond


 

That's not the worst... ask Mike how he got his first tek...

On Thu, Nov 26, 2020 at 7:26 PM Sparky99 <jnolan@iprova.com> wrote:

Just saw this on ebay in the UK :
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tektronix-Type-545-Oscilloscope-Vintage-Antique-Collectors/353290325095?hash=item5241be8c67:g:-GYAAOSwBPZfvDOx

Looks like it's been stored in a tropical jungle for a few years!

Anyone got any worse examples?






 

Raymond Domp Frank wrote:

The 466 is eminently suited to doing exactly what you're suggesting, much more so than even a 464.
With a 466 it's quite possible e.g. to store and then observe an edge with a rise time of 3.5 ns (the
fastest for the 100 MHz BW), either in Variable Persistence (repeating at say 1 Hz) or Fast Storage
(single shot) mode. Compare that with trying to view it on a 'scope like the 465, or for that matter,
a 475. Unless the signal has a repetition rate of at least 10 to 100 kHz, it'll be completely invisible!
That's fascinating. I might need to add the 466 to my wish list as well.

The computers that my father worked with in the late 70s had memory cycle times of 330 ns - 990 ns, so I expect that he could sustain a repetitive signal on target hardware at better than 200 kHz, so the 475 would have been able to show the signals of interest pretty easily.

Before I fell down this rabbit hole of fixing old scopes (started because the 475 malfunctioned) I was trying to use the 475 to decipher the control interface for a laptop plasma display panel. I was having some luck, but my fluency with the scope was terrible, and it was obvious that I was limited by my ignorance of how to use the delayed time base. When I've got the 475A working again I will be going back to the plasma display, and I hope that I have now learned enough about how to use the delayed time base to make better progress.

I know that this would be child's play if I just had a modern DSO, but that's not what I trying to do with this hobby, at least not right now. The 475 (and the 2200 series scopes) are exactly the right vintage to have been used with the hardware that I'm trying to investigate, and part of the fun is doing things the way that they would have been done at the time.

Of course it sounds like a 466 would make things a lot easier, while still being the proper vintage (the 468 is just slightly too new for my biases).

I have enough insight into my condition to understand that this is how one winds up with a basement full of scopes.


 

I'd like to try to drag this thread back on topic, however: I can't believe that my dirty 475 is the worst scope that anybody has seen. Somebody has to have better stories, at least, whether or not they have the pictures to prove it.

-- Jeff Dutky


Dave Seiter
 

I did hear a story a few years ago about a 500 series scope that was partially melted in one of the big north bay fires (2014 or 2016?), but no pictures.  (Also, it may not even have been a Tek; it was described as something like "one of those big old tube oscilloscopes with the round screen")
-Dave

On Thursday, November 26, 2020, 11:33:21 PM PST, Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

I'd like to try to drag this thread back on topic, however: I can't believe that my dirty 475 is the worst scope that anybody has seen. Somebody has to have better stories, at least, whether or not they have the pictures to prove it.

-- Jeff Dutky


Richard Steedman
 

Have you read the full description of this guy's scope? "i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off" "i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures" Those pictures should be a sight to behold!


greenboxmaven
 

For decades I have taken equipment that was discarded in disgust or stored horribly and restoring it to operation. Initially, it was because of poverty, now I get great enjoyment from rescuing it from the dumpster and solving the puzzle of it's problems. In 1971 I had returned from duty in southeast Asia to Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, New York to finish my term. Having worked on some neat stuff, I was interested in having some of the rigs for my own. At that time, a Tektronix 524 would cost $200.00 or more, and a Collins R-390 receiver would be $500.00 . Once I got to the base, I felt certain there would be surplus stores around, and there were, in nearby Utica. Enroute to one I had been told about, I noticed piles of gear out in the open in the heaped ruins of a burned building. Some of it was totally wrecked, but most was a bit smoked up and covered with dirt and ashes. The owner was delighted to sell us anything we wanted from the ruins for very low prices. I got an R-390 for $15.00, quite literally half buried in the ground, and a friend with me got a 535 scope that was just about as bad for the same price. After an initial stop at a self service car wash to get the worst of the dirt and ashes off, we both spent many evenings and a few weekends, and a good amount of penetrating oil and contact cleaner, dismantling and cleaning the rigs. Manuals were easily obtained, I worked in the radio shop and my friend had a connection in the instrumentation lab. We were both very surprised and impressed at how well they turned out physically, indeed good enough that some of the lifers and officers gave us a lot of crap about having "misappropriated" them. Fortunately, we were both returnees from the Vietnam theater, and knew what to expect and do. We had receipts from the surplus store and pre-restoration photos. The lifers then just shrugged in disappoinment and left us alone. We both enjoyed the fruits of our work, I kept the R-390 for years, and my friend used the scope for digital experimenting and very early computer crafting. What frightens me today is so few young people having the interest or ability to do such work, and the priceless learning and skill they could gain from doing so.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 11/27/20 5:59 AM, Richard Steedman wrote:
Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?
"i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"
"i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"
Those pictures should be a sight to behold!





Oz-in-DFW
 

Looks like it's been stored in a tropical jungle for a few years!
I'm thinking just below a pigeon loft or leaky garden shed.

Priced to be sucker bait, especially given the description. He's let all the smoke out and cut the cord!

--
Oz (in DFW) N1OZ


Michael A. Terrell
 

A friend brought me the remains of three partially cannibalized 564 scopes
once. I built one out of the three corpses. He was a contract broadcast
engineer, but he wouldn't touch test equipment that needed repairs. Over
the years he has sent a lot of repairable equipment to the landfill. Things
like dozens of probes for Boonton 92 meters. when the meter didn't work
with any of them. The probes are repairable, and the cables are expensive.
Some people! They were easily worth a couple grand, back then.

On Thu, Nov 26, 2020 at 8:41 PM - <rrrr6789@gmail.com> wrote:

I've seen ones in worse condition but I don't have pictures. Stuff
coming back to the US from some of the NASA tracking and communications
stations on the Caribbean islands looks much worse. That one looks like it
sat in an unairconditioned outdoor storage shed for 20 years. It's rather
typical of some of the equipment that I find at garage sales here in
central Florida.

On Thu, Nov 26, 2020 at 1:26 PM Sparky99 <jnolan@iprova.com> wrote:

Just saw this on ebay in the UK :
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tektronix-Type-545-Oscilloscope-Vintage-Antique-Collectors/353290325095?hash=item5241be8c67:g:-GYAAOSwBPZfvDOx

Looks like it's been stored in a tropical jungle for a few years!

Anyone got any worse examples?










stevenhorii
 

There are a few very promising young people who are very interested though.
I purchased a Tek 7844 on eBay - it was described as fully working. When I
saw where the seller was located, I contacted him and he gave me his
address - it turned out to be about a 45-minute drive away, so I went to
pick it up. To my surprise, the seller turned out to be a high school
student! He has been interested in electronics and had (until COVID-19
stopped that) working in a local calibration lab where he had access to a
wide range of bench test equipment.

I met him and his folks and was very impressed by his interests. In other
respects, he’s like other teenagers - rides a mountain bike (he sent some
videos to me and he’s not just riding around some flat terrain) and goes
hiking with friends. But, he also has mastered 3D printing and he and his
father built a shop he can work in.

I decided to gift him a number of Tek scopes that had been sitting in
storage - either because they had problems or were just not what I needed
and I just don’t have the time to fix the non-working ones. These included
7854s (only one of which worked at the time), a 7904, a 7104, a 454 (which
worked). He and his family came to pick them up (I told them they would
need a large SUV or a pickup truck - they have the latter). Within a couple
of weeks, he had two of the 7854s working and knows the problem in the
third (he found problems with the CPU board and the one that had been
working for me did not work when he powered it up). I told him he should
feel free to sell them when he’s done fixing them so he can help fund his
college tuition fund. The 3D printing? One of the rear feet of the 454 was
broken, so he 3D printed some. I think he may have offered them for sale
through this group.

He wants to go to MIT and I was happy to write a recommendation letter for
him.

A very impressive young man and he has the interest, promise, and skills to
establish a solid career in electrical engineering and will likely continue
to rescue and restore vintage electronic equipment as a “hobby”.

Steve Horii


On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 09:54 greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

For decades I have taken equipment that was discarded in disgust or
stored horribly and restoring it to operation. Initially, it was because
of poverty, now I get great enjoyment from rescuing it from the dumpster
and solving the puzzle of it's problems. In 1971 I had returned from
duty in southeast Asia to Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, New York to
finish my term. Having worked on some neat stuff, I was interested in
having some of the rigs for my own. At that time, a Tektronix 524 would
cost $200.00 or more, and a Collins R-390 receiver would be $500.00 .
Once I got to the base, I felt certain there would be surplus stores
around, and there were, in nearby Utica. Enroute to one I had been told
about, I noticed piles of gear out in the open in the heaped ruins of a
burned building. Some of it was totally wrecked, but most was a bit
smoked up and covered with dirt and ashes. The owner was delighted to
sell us anything we wanted from the ruins for very low prices. I got an
R-390 for $15.00, quite literally half buried in the ground, and a
friend with me got a 535 scope that was just about as bad for the same
price. After an initial stop at a self service car wash to get the worst
of the dirt and ashes off, we both spent many evenings and a few
weekends, and a good amount of penetrating oil and contact cleaner,
dismantling and cleaning the rigs. Manuals were easily obtained, I
worked in the radio shop and my friend had a connection in the
instrumentation lab. We were both very surprised and impressed at how
well they turned out physically, indeed good enough that some of the
lifers and officers gave us a lot of crap about having "misappropriated"
them. Fortunately, we were both returnees from the Vietnam theater, and
knew what to expect and do. We had receipts from the surplus store and
pre-restoration photos. The lifers then just shrugged in disappoinment
and left us alone. We both enjoyed the fruits of our work, I kept the
R-390 for years, and my friend used the scope for digital experimenting
and very early computer crafting. What frightens me today is so few
young people having the interest or ability to do such work, and the
priceless learning and skill they could gain from doing so.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 11/27/20 5:59 AM, Richard Steedman wrote:
Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?
"i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"
"i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"
Those pictures should be a sight to behold!











greenboxmaven
 

Wonderful! Now, we just need a million or so more of them. About twelve years ago, a large local auto dealership had a job fair. Entered apprentices would start at $17.00/hr plus full medical care and union benefits. They had ten jobs, and filled two of them. Clerical and financial jobs started at minimum wage with very sparse benefits, the applications were over twice the number of openings.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 11/27/20 1:48 PM, stevenhorii wrote:
There are a few very promising young people who are very interested though.
I purchased a Tek 7844 on eBay - it was described as fully working. When I
saw where the seller was located, I contacted him and he gave me his
address - it turned out to be about a 45-minute drive away, so I went to
pick it up. To my surprise, the seller turned out to be a high school
student! He has been interested in electronics and had (until COVID-19
stopped that) working in a local calibration lab where he had access to a
wide range of bench test equipment.

Steve Horii


On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 09:54 greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

For decades I have taken equipment that was discarded in disgust or
stored horribly and restoring it to operation. Initially, it was because
of poverty, now I get great enjoyment from rescuing it from the dumpster
and solving the puzzle of it's problems.
What frightens me today is so few
young people having the interest or ability to do such work, and the
priceless learning and skill they could gain from doing so.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 11/27/20 5:59 AM, Richard Steedman wrote:
Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?
"i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"
"i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"
Those pictures should be a sight to behold!












Jim Ford
 

I hope you pointed him to TekScopes and TekWiki.Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: stevenhorii <sonodocsch@gmail.com> Date: 11/27/20 10:48 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] worst condition Tektronix scope? There are a few very promising young people who are very interested though.I purchased a Tek 7844 on eBay - it was described as fully working. When Isaw where the seller was located, I contacted him and he gave me hisaddress - it turned out to be about a 45-minute drive away, so I went topick it up. To my surprise, the seller turned out to be a high schoolstudent! He has been interested in electronics and had (until COVID-19stopped that) working in a local calibration lab where he had access to awide range of bench test equipment.I met him and his folks and was very impressed by his interests. In otherrespects, he’s like other teenagers - rides a mountain bike (he sent somevideos to me and he’s not just riding around some flat terrain) and goeshiking with friends. But, he also has mastered 3D printing and he and hisfather built a shop he can work in.I decided to gift him a number of Tek scopes that had been sitting instorage - either because they had problems or were just not what I neededand I just don’t have the time to fix the non-working ones. These included7854s (only one of which worked at the time), a 7904, a 7104, a 454 (whichworked). He and his family came to pick them up (I told them they wouldneed a large SUV or a pickup truck - they have the latter). Within a coupleof weeks, he had two of the 7854s working and knows the problem in thethird (he found problems with the CPU board and the one that had beenworking for me did not work when he powered it up). I told him he shouldfeel free to sell them when he’s done fixing them so he can help fund hiscollege tuition fund. The 3D printing? One of the rear feet of the 454 wasbroken, so he 3D printed some. I think he may have offered them for salethrough this group.He wants to go to MIT and I was happy to write a recommendation letter forhim.A very impressive young man and he has the interest, promise, and skills toestablish a solid career in electrical engineering and will likely continueto rescue and restore vintage electronic equipment as a “hobby”.Steve HoriiOn Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 09:54 greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:> For decades I have taken equipment that was discarded in disgust or> stored horribly and restoring it to operation. Initially, it was because> of poverty, now I get great enjoyment from rescuing it from the dumpster> and solving the puzzle of it's problems.  In 1971 I had returned from> duty in southeast Asia to  Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, New York to> finish my term. Having worked on some neat stuff, I was interested in> having some of the rigs for my own. At that time, a Tektronix 524 would> cost $200.00 or more, and a Collins R-390 receiver would be $500.00 .> Once I got to the base, I felt certain there would be surplus stores> around, and there were, in nearby Utica.  Enroute to one I had been told> about, I noticed piles of gear out in the open in the heaped ruins of a> burned building. Some of it was totally wrecked, but most was a bit> smoked up and covered with dirt and ashes. The owner  was delighted to> sell us anything we wanted from the ruins for very low prices. I got an> R-390 for $15.00, quite literally half buried in the ground, and a> friend with me got a 535 scope that was just about as bad for the same> price. After an initial stop at a self service car wash to get the worst> of the dirt and ashes off, we both spent many evenings and a few> weekends, and a good amount of penetrating oil and contact cleaner,> dismantling and cleaning the rigs. Manuals were easily obtained, I> worked in the radio shop and my friend had a connection in the> instrumentation lab. We were both very surprised and impressed at how> well they turned out physically, indeed good enough that some of the> lifers and officers gave us a lot of crap about having "misappropriated"> them.  Fortunately, we were both returnees from the Vietnam theater, and> knew what to expect and do. We had receipts from the surplus store and> pre-restoration photos.  The lifers then just shrugged in disappoinment> and left us alone. We both enjoyed the fruits of our work, I kept the> R-390 for years, and my friend used the scope for digital experimenting> and very early computer crafting.  What frightens me today is so few> young people having the interest or ability to do such work, and the> priceless learning and skill they could gain from doing so.>>        Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY>>> On 11/27/20 5:59 AM, Richard Steedman wrote:> > Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?> > "i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"> > "i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"> > Those pictures should be a sight to behold!> >> >> >> >> >> >>>>> >>>


 

Richard Steedman wrote:

Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?
"i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"
"i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"
Those pictures should be a sight to behold!
The color of the smoke is VERY important: it tells you whether or not we have a new Pope.

-- Jeff Dutky


Harvey White
 

I've looked in the catalogs for both HP and Tektronix.  I haven't seen any mention of a Tektronix Pope.

Harvey

(nor HP)

Would one be used to look at the output of an old style Vatican Camera?

H.

On 11/27/2020 4:42 PM, Jeff Dutky wrote:
Richard Steedman wrote:
Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?
"i plugged it in but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"
"i will take the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"
Those pictures should be a sight to behold!
The color of the smoke is VERY important: it tells you whether or not we have a new Pope.

-- Jeff Dutky





stevenhorii
 

Yes, I did. Also to Vintage Tek. I believe he reviewed many of the 7854
comments as he was troubleshooting the scopes I gave him. I encouraged him
to put up the replacement 454 rear feet for sale or maybe post the 3D print
files to the group.

Steve H.

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 4:17 PM Jim Ford <james.ford@cox.net> wrote:

I hope you pointed him to TekScopes and TekWiki.Jim Ford Sent from my
Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: stevenhorii <sonodocsch@gmail.com>
Date: 11/27/20 10:48 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject:
Re: [TekScopes] worst condition Tektronix scope? There are a few very
promising young people who are very interested though.I purchased a Tek
7844 on eBay - it was described as fully working. When Isaw where the
seller was located, I contacted him and he gave me hisaddress - it turned
out to be about a 45-minute drive away, so I went topick it up. To my
surprise, the seller turned out to be a high schoolstudent! He has been
interested in electronics and had (until COVID-19stopped that) working in a
local calibration lab where he had access to awide range of bench test
equipment.I met him and his folks and was very impressed by his interests.
In otherrespects, he’s like other teenagers - rides a mountain bike (he
sent somevideos to me and he’s not just riding around some flat terrain)
and goeshiking with friends. But, he also has mastered 3D printing and he
and hisfather built a shop he can work in.I decided to gift him a number of
Tek scopes that had been sitting instorage - either because they had
problems or were just not what I neededand I just don’t have the time to
fix the non-working ones. These included7854s (only one of which worked at
the time), a 7904, a 7104, a 454 (whichworked). He and his family came to
pick them up (I told them they wouldneed a large SUV or a pickup truck -
they have the latter). Within a coupleof weeks, he had two of the 7854s
working and knows the problem in thethird (he found problems with the CPU
board and the one that had beenworking for me did not work when he powered
it up). I told him he shouldfeel free to sell them when he’s done fixing
them so he can help fund hiscollege tuition fund. The 3D printing? One of
the rear feet of the 454 wasbroken, so he 3D printed some. I think he may
have offered them for salethrough this group.He wants to go to MIT and I
was happy to write a recommendation letter forhim.A very impressive young
man and he has the interest, promise, and skills toestablish a solid career
in electrical engineering and will likely continueto rescue and restore
vintage electronic equipment as a “hobby”.Steve HoriiOn Fri, Nov 27, 2020
at 09:54 greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=verizon.net@groups.io>
wrote:> For decades I have taken equipment that was discarded in disgust
or> stored horribly and restoring it to operation. Initially, it was
because> of poverty, now I get great enjoyment from rescuing it from the
dumpster> and solving the puzzle of it's problems. In 1971 I had returned
from> duty in southeast Asia to Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, New York
to> finish my term. Having worked on some neat stuff, I was interested in>
having some of the rigs for my own. At that time, a Tektronix 524 would>
cost $200.00 or more, and a Collins R-390 receiver would be $500.00 .> Once
I got to the base, I felt certain there would be surplus stores> around,
and there were, in nearby Utica. Enroute to one I had been told> about, I
noticed piles of gear out in the open in the heaped ruins of a> burned
building. Some of it was totally wrecked, but most was a bit> smoked up and
covered with dirt and ashes. The owner was delighted to> sell us anything
we wanted from the ruins for very low prices. I got an> R-390 for $15.00,
quite literally half buried in the ground, and a> friend with me got a 535
scope that was just about as bad for the same> price. After an initial stop
at a self service car wash to get the worst> of the dirt and ashes off, we
both spent many evenings and a few> weekends, and a good amount of
penetrating oil and contact cleaner,> dismantling and cleaning the rigs.
Manuals were easily obtained, I> worked in the radio shop and my friend had
a connection in the> instrumentation lab. We were both very surprised and
impressed at how> well they turned out physically, indeed good enough that
some of the> lifers and officers gave us a lot of crap about having
"misappropriated"> them. Fortunately, we were both returnees from the
Vietnam theater, and> knew what to expect and do. We had receipts from the
surplus store and> pre-restoration photos. The lifers then just shrugged
in disappoinment> and left us alone. We both enjoyed the fruits of our
work, I kept the> R-390 for years, and my friend used the scope for digital
experimenting> and very early computer crafting. What frightens me today
is so few> young people having the interest or ability to do such work, and
the> priceless learning and skill they could gain from doing so.>>
Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY>>> On 11/27/20 5:59 AM, Richard Steedman wrote:> >
Have you read the full description of this guy's scope?> > "i plugged it in
but it started smoking (white smoke) so i turned it off"> > "i will take
the side panel off tomorrow and take some pictures"> > Those pictures
should be a sight to behold!> >> >> >> >> >> >>>>> >>>





Dynoguy
 

Jeff,

don't want to be picky,..., but it seems you ignored the 464, ....:-)
got one right in front of me, above the trusty old 465 and a newly arrived 475 in bits on the desk

cheers,
Mike


 

Dynoguy wrote:

don't want to be picky,..., but it seems you ignored the 464, ....:-)
It would have added some nice parallelism to the list.

I will endeavor to do better next time. (hangs head in shame)

-- Jeff Dutky


 

Paul Amaranth wrote:

Well, if you want to enjoy the madness, I have a pair of 468s to get rid of. One was
working pretty much but is showing signs of bad filter caps and the other is a parts scope.
I would actually be interested in the 468s, especially if there's work required (that's at least half the fun).

I'm willing to pay shipping. Is there other compensation you would like?

-- Jeff Dutky